Video/Microlecture: Culture, Heritage and Climate Change

A panel discussion organised by the Getty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council on the impact of climate change on the built environment. The lecture consists of a panel discussion that focuses on the links between climate change, preservation and future sustainability of historical buildings and modern infrastructure. The lecture also discusses how rise in temperatures, increased weather events, pollution, and frequent catastrophes can impact historical and contemporary infrastructure. The panel discusses two major themes: 

  1. What is the impact of climate change on our existing heritage and what can we do to preserve it?
  2. What is the role of cultural heritage in preserving or delaying the impact of climate change?

Through these themes, the lecture discusses the importance of finding a solution to climate change issues to ensure continued preservation of cultural heritage, history and society. 

Students will learn about the impact of climate change and global warming on the historic and modern built environment. Through examples such as termites destroying monumental buildings and homes, they will also learn about the various ways in which climate change directly impacts the natural environment and has indirect consequences on the built environment. Students will further learn the need for development to include sustainability and reuse of materials to preserve existing and future infrastructure.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact heritage structures? 
  2. How does cultural heritage help preserve or slow the impact of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change & Preserving Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Humanities,  Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCultural Studies, History, Heritage, Architecture, Built Environment, Urban Environment, Culture,, Sustainability 
Climate Topic Climate and Society 
Type of tool Video/Lecture (1 hr 36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGetty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Quiz on Carbon Cycle

An interactive online quiz to test student’s understanding of the carbon cycle. This quiz by NASA can help students understand the various components of the carbon cycle and their influence on Earth’s climate. 

Students will learn about the processes involved in regulating carbon and the role of atmospheric carbon in the carbon cycle. They will further understand how changes in these components can contribute to climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the various components of the Carbon Cycle? 
  2. Discuss how the cycling of carbon through the atmosphere is affected by anthropogenic activities. 
  3. Discuss the difference between carbon sinks and carbon sources using examples.

About the tool

Tool NameCarbon and the climate
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences: Chemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate Topic Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Type of tool Classroom/Laboratory Activity
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNASA
Hosted athttps://climate.nasa.gov/
Linkhttps://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/96/quiz-carbon-and-the-climate/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Introduction to the Carbon Cycle

An infographic that describes the Carbon Cycle and how anthropogenic activities affect the Carbon Cycle. This infographic by NASA explains how higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities are affecting the natural carbon cycle.

Students will learn about the carbon cycle and the absorption of carbon dioxide by the land and oceans. They will further be introduced to facts and figures regarding the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the ‘Carbon Cycle’ in the classroom. 
  2. How do anthropogenic activities affect carbon dioxide concentrations? 

About the tool

Tool NameEarth’s carbon cycle is off balance
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences; Chemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate Topic Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNASA
Hosted atClimate NASA Website
Linkhttps://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/136/infographic-earths-carbon-cycle-is-off-balance/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Carbon Sequestration in Soil

A reading by Judith D. Schwatz for YaleE360, published at the Yale School of the Environment, that describes how carbon is stored in soil. It discusses carbon sequestration, carbon capture and storage and carbon sources and sinks. It further highlights how the release of carbon from the soil due to anthropogenic activities can cause global warming. 

Students will learn about ‘soil carbon’ and its role in sequestering carbon dioxide. They will understand the importance of land restoration and some of the techniques and methods utilised to improve soil quality. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘carbon sequestration’?
  2. Discuss the role of soil in the carbon cycle?
  3. Describe some of the methods used to restore land. 

About the tool

Tool NameSoil as Carbon Storehouse: New Weapon in Climate Fight?
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Carbon Sequestration, Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate and the Lithosphere; Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJudith D. Schwatz 
Hosted atYaleE360, published at the Yale School of the Environment
Linkhttps://e360.yale.edu/features/soil_as_carbon_storehouse_new_weapon_in_climate_fight
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change

A reading that describes natural carbon sources and sinks. This reading by Noelle Eckley Selin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes how anthropogenic activities alter the concentration of carbon in various sources and sinks, thus, contributing to global warming.

Students will learn about the various types of carbon sinks and sources. They will further understand the importance of the removal of this excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using technologies for carbon capture and storage, and carbon sequestration.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the natural sources and sinks of carbon on Earth?
  2. Discuss the importance of carbon sequestration for climate mitigation.
  3. Discuss carbon sequestration through carbon capture and storage technologies.

About the tool

Tool NameCarbon Sequestration
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Sequestration, Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate and the Biosphere; Climate and the Lithosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNoelle Eckley Selin
Hosted atBritannica
Linkhttps://www.britannica.com/technology/carbon-sequestration
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: COVID-19 and CO2 emissions

A webinar by Carbon Brief on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The webinar includes discussions by the following climate scientist and analysts:

  1. Corinne Le Quéré, University of East Anglia, presented that CO2 released due to human activities fell by seventeen percent by April, 2020. This temporarily brought down the emissions to the levels observed in the year 2006.
  2. Richard Betts, University of Exeter, said that while the CO2 concentrations were only eleven percent of the expected emissions for 2020, they have continued to rise and accumulate in the atmosphere.
  3. Lauri Myllyvirta, Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA), discussed his research related to emissions in China and India during the pandemic.
  4. Zeke Hausfather, director of Breakthrough Institute, discusses how 2019 might be the peak year for CO2 emissions.

Students will learn about the perspectives of various researchers and their interpretation of the CO2 concentrations recorded during the pandemic. They will also be introduced to various future predictions of emissions in different sectors, countries and under different policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the overall global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the CO2 concentrations?
  2. How does the change in CO2 concentrations impact climate change?

About the Tool

Tool NameWebinar: What impact is Covid-19 having on global CO2 emissions?
DisciplineEnvironmental Science; Economics
Topic(s) in DisciplineGreenhouse Gas Emissions, CO2 emissions, COVID-19, Environmental Economics, Atmospheric CO2, Economic Policies
Climate TopicGreenhouse Effect; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolVideo (66 mins)
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byCarbon Brief 
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/webinar-what-impact-is-covid-19-having-on-global-co2-emissions?utm_source=Web&utm_medium=contentbox&utm_campaign=Covid-box
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Concrete Problem

A reading that describes how the cement industry contributes to global warming. This reading by Carbon Brief discusses the production of traditional cement and how this contributes to 8% of carbon dioxide emissions globally. It further highlights the projected increase in demand for concrete, particularly in developing countries, and how this could potentially raise emissions further. 

Students will learn about global large-scale cement production and the resulting carbon emissions. They will also learn about alternate and ‘novel’ methods of production that are being researched and the complexities of switching to these modes of production. They will further understand the practical, political and economic complexities with respect to cutting emissions as per global standards. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is cement and how is it produced?
  2. List some of the reasons ‘emissions per tonne of output’ has reduced in cement production? In contrast, why are sector emissions still on the rise? 
  3. Discuss the current ‘roadmap’ of cement production with respect to the 2C scenario.

About the tool

Tool Name‘Q&A: Why cement emissions matter for climate change’
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Chemistry, Cement, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Pollution
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJocelyn Timperley, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/qa-why-cement-emissions-matter-for-climate-change
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change and Crop Pollination

A report that describes the effect of climate change on animal pollinators and crop pollination. This report from 2011 by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) details the different climate variables, such as temperature, precipitation and extreme climate events that affect crop pollination. It further highlights the potential economic implications of climate change on crop pollination and, thereby, on global food security.

Students will understand the effects of climate change on pollinators, and the temperature sensitivity of crop pollinators and entomophilous crops. They will further learn about how climate change has affected quality and quantity of nectar and pollen, phenological events, pollinator behavior, visitation rates, and distribution. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the impacts of climate change on insect pollination?
  2. Discuss the importance of insect pollination for global food security.

About the tool

Tool NamePotential Effects of Climate Change on Crop Pollination
DisciplineBiological Sciences; Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplinePollination, Fertilization, Insect Pollination, Pollinators, Plant-Pollinator Systems, Adaptations, Nectar Guides, Types of Pollinators
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byFood and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Hosted atFood and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Website
Linkhttp://www.fao.org/3/i2242e/i2242e.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Locust Plague of East Africa

An article titled ‘A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame’ by Madeleine Stone in the National Geographic that discusses the relationship between the 2019-20 desert locust swarms in East Africa and climate change. The article focuses on how rising sea surface temperatures, storms and cyclones, changing ocean circulation patterns caused by human activity may have triggered this trans-oceanic disaster and destruction of food supply. 

Students will learn about how climate change triggered the mass migration of the desert locusts over East Africa. They will also learn about the unseasonal cyclones and storms that led to unusual locust breeding that resulted in the widespread destruction of crops and disrupted the food chain in East Africa. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are desert locusts?
  2. Is climate change responsible for the current locust outbreak in East Africa? Discuss.
  3. How is the locust plague causing food insecurity in some countries?

About the tool: 

Tool NameA plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Species Migration, Agriculture 
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture 
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byMadeleine Stone
Hosted atNational Geographic
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Evolutionary Adaptation in Response to Climate Change

A video microlecture that briefly describes evolutionary adaptations in animals due to climate change. This video by educator, Erin Eastwood, for TED-Ed introduces the topic of evolutionary adaptation and how animals are forced to evolve to changed environments caused by climate change. 

Students will learn how climate change has led to ecosystem disruptions and changes in the environment of many animal species. They will also be introduced to the difference between evolutionary adaptation and phenotypic plasticity and will understand the importance of heritable traits to the survival of a species. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is evolutionary adaptation? Give suitable examples.
  2. How is adaptation different from phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental change? 

About the tool

Tool NameCan wildlife adapt to climate change? – Erin Eastwood
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEvolution, Adaptation, Evolutionary Adaptations, Natural Selection, Phenotypic Plasticity, Phenotypic Variations, Genetic Variations, Morphological Traits
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Video/Micro lecture (5 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byErin Eastwood for TED-Ed
Hosted atYouTube, Ted-Ed
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCKRjP_DMII
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change and the Syrian Civil War

A reading titled ‘Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought’ by Kelley et al (2015), in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that discusses how climate change could have caused the 2007-2010 drought that may have led to the civil war in Syria. This article from 2015 first drew linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria. In this article, the authors separate the natural variability of Syrian climate from anthropogenically induced climate change and conclude that the warming and drying weather trend was caused due to human influence.

Students will understand how climate change can alter the weather of a region and can cause droughts. Using the example of the 2007-10 drought in Syria, students will learn how global warming can affect food security and even lead to mass human migration. Students will further learn how poor governance, state fragility, unsustainable environmental policies coupled with global warming impacts can lead to the collapse of the state, poverty, and war.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change could have led to the 2007-2010 drought in Syria 
  2. Discuss the linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria.

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Environmental Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDrought, Peace and Conflict Studies, Security, Human Migration, War, Civil War, Syria
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byColin P. Kelly Shahrzad Mohtadi, Mark A. Cane, Richard Seager, Yochanan Kushnir
Hosted atProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Global Warming and Sleep Deprivation

A video microlecture that discusses the potential impact of global warming on human health and sleep cycles. This video by Ryan Cross, hosted on the website of the journal Science,  describes the effects of warmer  temperatures on sleep quality in individuals in the United States. 

Students will learn how sleep is negatively affected by higher nighttime temperatures that lead to adverse impacts on human health. They will further learn how certain vulnerable groups such as the elderly and those from lower socio-economic backgrounds tend to be more severely affected.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change induced warming impact sleep cycles? 
  2. Discuss some negative impacts on individual health due to sleep deprivation. 

About the tool

Tool NameScientists warn of sleepless nights in a warming world
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Health, Sleep, Sleep Cycles, Sleep Deprivation
Climate Topic Climate and Health
Type of tool Video (3 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal, USA
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRyan Cross
Hosted atScience
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Bark Beetle Outbreaks in Bhutan

A reading that discusses ecosystems, biomes, food chains, and food webs and how the balance of an ecosystem can be disrupted by climate change induced insect outbreak. This reading by Dr. Kaka Tshering and Chimi Tshering, Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environmental Research (UWICER), Bhutan; and University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria discusses  how global warming can potentially impact ecosystems in the forests of Bhutan. It further describes strategies to predict climate change induced bark beetle outbreaks in the forest ecosystems of Bhutan using GIS, Climate, and Phenology data. 

Students will learn about the life cycle of the bark beetle and how bark beetle outbreaks tend to occur due to increased temperatures. They will further understand the factors responsible for the susceptibility of forest ecosystems to bark beetle outbreaks in Bhutan and how climate and phenology data can be used to mitigate the effects.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change induced warming affect bark beetle outbreaks? 
  2. Discuss how frequent bark beetle outbreaks have made forest ecosystems of Bhutan unstable.
  3. Discuss how the use of GIS, phenology, and climate data helped to preempt bark beetle outbreaks and protect the susceptible forest ecosystems of Bhutan.

About the tool

Tool NamePredicting Bark Beetle Outbreaks using GIS, Climate and Phenology Data
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEcosystems, Food webs, Bark Beetle, Phenology, Forest Ecosystem
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationBhutan
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byKaka Tshering and Chimi Tshering
Hosted atUgyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environmental Research (UWICER), Bhutan; and University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria
Linkhttp://www.uwice.gov.bt/admin_uwice/publications/publication_files/Reports/2018/Predicting%20Bark%20Beetle%20Outbreaks%20using%20GIS,%20Climate%20and%20Phenology%20Data_UWICER%20Technical%20Note%202018.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: ‘Move, Adapt or Die’

A reading that discusses different aspects of evolutionary adaptations to climate change in animals. This reading by Renee Cho, Earth Institute, Columbia University, uses various examples to showcase how animals adapt to climate change and how a warming climate forces animals to ‘move, adapt or die’. 

Students will learn about some of the morphological, biological, and physiological adaptations that occur in response to climate change. They will further be introduced to the concept of epigenetics, its role in phenotypic plasticity and how this differs from environmental adaptation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is evolutionary adaptation? How does it differ from phenotypic plasticity? Give an example. 
  2. How is climate change influencing evolutionary adaptations in living organisms? 
  3. What is epigenetics? Discuss its role in phenotypic plasticity? 
  4. Discuss why it is important to maintain large species populations and biodiversity in the context of adaptations.

About the tool

Tool NameWhat Helps Animals Adapt (or Not) to Climate Change?
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEvolution, Evolutionary Adaptations, Natural SelectionPhenotypic Variations, Genetic Variations
Gene Frequency, Phenotypic Plasticity
Morphological or Physiological Traits, Epigenetic Factors
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRenee Cho
Hosted atEarth Institute, Columbia University
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Climate Change and Human Evolution

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the impacts of climate change on human evolution and early civilizations. This video lecture is part 1 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn how climate change possibly impacted speciation, bipedalism, evolution of brain size, cultural evolution and the appearance and disappearance of certain ancient civilizations. They will also learn about the impact of various glacial and interglacial periods, East-African aridification, and changes in sea surface temperature and rainfall on human evolution and history during the Pleistocene. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How has climate change potentially impacted our evolution from apes to Homo sapiens?
  2. Explain the relationship between plate tectonics, El Nino patterns and human evolution.
  3. Discuss examples of species extinction by early human in Africa and Australia. 

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L01 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 01
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Evolution, Anthropology, Human History, Early Civilizations, Bipedalism,  East-African Aridification
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere, Climate and Biosphere, Climate Variability Record
Type of toolVideo (42 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change and Locust Swarms

An article titled ‘Q&A: Are the 2019-20 locust swarms linked to climate change?’ by Daisy Dunne in Carbon Brief that discusses the potential link between climate change and the locust outbreak in East Africa and surrounding regions. The article discusses how climate change has influenced heavy rains, unusual storm activity and a change in the ‘Indian Ocean Dipole’ from East Africa, the Middle East, parts of Asia to Western Australia. The article further tracks the beginning and spread of the outbreak causing mass crop failure. 

Students will learn about how climate change potentially led to the mass breeding and outbreak of desert locusts in East Africa and surrounding regions. They will also learn about how changing weather patterns, rising sea temperatures and altered oceanic currents can provide breeding grounds for desert locusts. Students will further learn about what makes desert locusts resilient, allowing them to migrate and cause mass crop failure in many countries. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What countries were affected by the locust plague of 2019-20?
  2. What weather conditions are favourable for locust breeding?
  3. Is climate change responsible for the current locust outbreak? Discuss.
  4. How is the locust plague causing food insecurity in some countries?

About the tool: 

Tool NameQ&A: Are the 2019-20 locust swarms linked to climate change?
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Species Migration, Agriculture
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture 
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen, India, Pakistan
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDaisy Dunne
Hosted atCarbon Brief
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Species extinction due to climate change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Mammalian Extinction due to Human-Induced Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: IUCN Fact Sheet of Species Extinction due to Climate Change (Bramble Cay Melomys)

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic