Video/Microlecture: Culture, Heritage and Climate Change

A panel discussion organised by the Getty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council on the impact of climate change on the built environment. The lecture consists of a panel discussion that focuses on the links between climate change, preservation and future sustainability of historical buildings and modern infrastructure. The lecture also discusses how rise in temperatures, increased weather events, pollution, and frequent catastrophes can impact historical and contemporary infrastructure. The panel discusses two major themes: 

  1. What is the impact of climate change on our existing heritage and what can we do to preserve it?
  2. What is the role of cultural heritage in preserving or delaying the impact of climate change?

Through these themes, the lecture discusses the importance of finding a solution to climate change issues to ensure continued preservation of cultural heritage, history and society. 

Students will learn about the impact of climate change and global warming on the historic and modern built environment. Through examples such as termites destroying monumental buildings and homes, they will also learn about the various ways in which climate change directly impacts the natural environment and has indirect consequences on the built environment. Students will further learn the need for development to include sustainability and reuse of materials to preserve existing and future infrastructure.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact heritage structures? 
  2. How does cultural heritage help preserve or slow the impact of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change & Preserving Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Humanities,  Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCultural Studies, History, Heritage, Architecture, Built Environment, Urban Environment, Culture,, Sustainability 
Climate Topic Climate and Society 
Type of tool Video/Lecture (1 hr 36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGetty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Postcolonial Studies and Climate Change

A reading by Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago titled ‘Postcolonial Studies and the Challenge of Climate Change’ that discusses the link between globalization and global warming. Chakrabarty discusses this link through the writings of Homi K. Bhabha, that aims to stretch post colonial thinking to include the reality of climate change and global warming. The reading also discusses the challenges that climate change issues pose in a “neoliberal” capitalist world. Chakrabarty highlights the three images of human that currently exist:

  1. The universalist-Enlightenment view of the human with the ability to exercise rights 
  2. The globalized view of the human
  3. The human as a geological force that changes the climate 

Chakrabarty makes this distinction to understand the current debate between society, globalization and climate change. Through the writings of Homi K. Bhabha, the reading discusses ‘the postcolonial criticism of the human’ and ‘the human in the anthropocene’ that focuses on issues such as anthropogenic global warming, degradation of the natural environment and the development of humanity. 

Students will learn about postcolonial globalization and climate change. They will also learn about the criticism that postcolonial thinkers have about the current age of the anthropocene and the increasing changes in the climate. Students will further learn about the attempts that postcolonial thinkers have made to ensure that climate change and global warming are part of the human reality for future preservation of the environment. Additionally, students will learn about the failed recognition that society gives to the interdependence of humans on nature and its natural beings.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the link between globalization and climate change?
  2. How do postcolonial thinkers criticise the age of the anthropocene?
  3. Discuss the three images that postcolonial thinkers have created for the human 
  4. How can postcolonial studies about the anthropocene inform the future?

About the Tool 

Tool NamePostcolonial Studies and the Challenge of Climate Change 
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePostcolonial Studies, Cultural Studies, Neoliberalism, Anthropocene, Globalization, Capitalism
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDipesh Chakrabarty New Literary History (Vol 43, 1)
Hosted atThe Johns Hopkins University Press
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Historical Climatology- The Roman Empire

A video by Michael McCormick, Harvard University that discusses the link between science, history and climate change. The lecture discusses the history of Rome and Medieval Europe through the use of archaeological tools, genetics and computer science. It highlights some drastic climatic events that led to changes within the Roman Empire. Additionally, the lecture discusses the challenges that medieval societies faced in understanding, responding to, adapting to and mitigating environmental events. 

Students will learn the role of Historical Studies in understanding impacts of climate change on the Roman Empire and Medieval Europe. They will also learn about the techniques developed and used by historians and climate scientists to study historical climate from a thousand years ago. Additionally, students will learn about the major historical climate crises.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is historical climatology?
  2. Discuss the 4 phases of the climate during the Roman Empire
  3. How does history inform current climate  action?

About the tool

Tool NameConnecting Roman and Medieval Climate and Historical Change
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Historical Climatology, Archaeology, Anthropology, Roman Empire, Medieval Europe
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Lecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0PWjxs-wXI
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Audio: Fall of the Pyramid Age of Egypt

An audio by Michael Dee at ‘Teddy Talks’, University of Oxford that discusses the potential role of climate change in the collapse of the ‘pyramid age’ in Egypt. The audio discusses a timeline of the historic Northeast African region and its societies at the beginning of the ‘pyramid age’. Dee then discusses the use and effectiveness of radiocarbon dating to map out the impacts of climate change and the ‘mega-drought’ that potentially led to the fall of the Egyptian, Mesopotamia and Indus Valley civilizations.   

Students will learn about the history and fall of the Egyptian Civilization. They will also learn about the debate on whether the collapse was caused by climate change or inefficient governance. Students will also learn about the various environmental events in neighbouring regions that potentially affected ancient Egypt. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the ‘pyramid age’? 
  2. How did the ‘mega-drought’ cause the collapse of the Mesopotamian civilization?
  3. Discuss whether climate change caused the fall of the civilization.

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change and the fall of the Pyramid Age of Egypt 
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate and Society 
Climate Topic History, Historical Studies, Archaeology, Anthropology, Radiocarbon Dating, Egyptian Civilization, Pyramid Age
Type of tool Audio (11 mins 30 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationAfrica, Egypt 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe University of Oxford Podcasts 
Hosted atThe University of Oxford
Linkhttps://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/climate-change-and-fall-pyramid-age-egypt
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/ Microlecture: Poetry in Strange Times

A microlecture titled ‘As climate changes, I order a salad: contemporary poetry and the strange times of climate change’ by Sam Solnick,  University of Liverpool that discusses three poems that focus on temporalities associated with climate change. The video also discusses the role of media and poetry in shaping the climate change narrative. The video further discusses methods of analysing contemporary poetry. 

Students will learn about the representation of climate change in contemporary poetry. They will also learn about different interpretations and approaches to understand climate change through poetry. Students will further learn of the impact of digital media on how we perceive and respond to climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the various temporalities of climate change?
  2. How does the media shape our experience of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameAs climate changes, I order a salad: contemporary poetry and the strange times of climate change
DisciplineHumanities, English 
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry,  Literature,  Anthropocene, Temporalities, Digital Media
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (17 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySam Solnick, University of Liverpool
Hosted atVimeo
Linkhttps://vimeo.com/164747631
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Audio: Climate Change Literature

An audio podcast titled ‘Climate Change and Literature: Reading Change’ that features Dr. Jemma Deer, Harvard University Center for the Environment. The podcast discusses the role of literature to understand and deal with climate change. The podcast discusses how analysing literature can allow for various interpretations and perceptions of climate change and the anthropocene. The podcast further discusses how literature allows for physical traces of society to be tracked and linked to climate change and nature, hence can potentially influence solutions.  

Students will learn about the role of literature in understanding climate change and human society. They will also learn about the influence of literature on perceptions of climate change. Students will further learn about how understanding the anthropocene can influence climate change policy and solutions.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does literature help understand climate change?
  2. What is the anthropocene?
  3. How can interpretations of literature influence how society responds to climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change and Literature: Reading Change
DisciplineHumanities, English 
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature,  Anthropocene
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Audio (28 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAlice Evatt, Henry Tann
Hosted atThe Oxford Research Center in Humanities, University of Oxford 
Linkhttps://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/climate-change-and-literature-reading-change
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Climate Change Poetry

A set of poems commissioned by the Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) that feature 9 poems on the theme of climate change. The poems are based on the collective understanding of climate change and human response to this global phenomenon. These pieces were commissioned as part of ‘Seven Dimensions of Climate Change’ series of the RSA and include the following poems

  1. ‘A Climate of Change’ by George the Poet 
  2. ‘How’s My Coal’ by Simon Barraclough
  3. ‘Except for the Lone Wave’ by Grace Nichols 
  4. ‘Untitled’ by Tom Chivers 
  5. ‘We Have Everything We Need’ by Selena Nwulu
  6. ‘Water is Company’ by Ruth Padel 
  7. ‘Polar Heart’ by Simon Barraclough
  8. ‘Inheritance’ by John Agard 
  9. ‘Alongside Beans’ by Alice Oswald 

Students will learn about climate change and its impacts on society through poetry. They will also learn about linkages of  science and human emotion. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is climate poetry?
  2. How can poetry be used to tackle the issue of climate change?
  3. What are the essential components of poetry? 

About the tool: 

Tool Name9 Original Poems on Climate Change
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry, Literature
Climate Topic Climate and Society  
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) 
Hosted atThe Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA)  
Linkhttps://www.thersa.org/globalassets/pdfs/events/climate-change-poetry-anthology.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: A Commentary on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s The Climate of History: Four Theses

A short video commentary  by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India  on ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’ by Dipesh Chakrabarty. This video commentary summarizes Dipesh Chakrabarty’s essay on the link between history, literature and climate change. Dodd summarizes the four theses posed by Chakrabarty in his essay.   

Students will learn about the link between climate change and history of the human species and the planet. They will specifically learn about the ‘Anthropocene’ and the four theses that Dipesh Chakraborty poses to better understand the evolution of human history and the environment.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between human history and environmental history.
  2. What are the four theses posed by Dipesh Chakrabarty in his essay? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Commentary By Maya Dodd on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineAnthropocene, History, Literature, Fiction, Non-fiction, Environmental Humanities 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (5 min 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, Pune, India for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU
Linkhttps://videos.files.wordpress.com/G0y5ng1D/m-dodd_video-micro-lecture_dcfourtheses_hd.mp4
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Rap Music and Climate Change

A music album titled ‘The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos’ by Baba Brinkman that contains 24 tracks on climate change. The album discusses the science, politics and economics of climate change. The tracks cover a variety of topics such as greenhouse gases, carbon emissions, climate taxes and green capitalism.  

Tracks include – Options, I.P.C.C., Keep It Positive, Greenhouse (feat. Aaron Nazrul), Party Don’t Stop, Run the Joules, Mo Carbon Mo Problems, What’s Beef (feat. Bill Nye), Battle Lines, Lost in the Numbers, Bright Side, Fossil Fuel Ballers (feat. Aaron Nazrul), Exxon Knew, Laudato Si, Yank the Plug, Make It Hot, Regulators, Carbon Bubble (feat. Mariella), Stranded Assets, Ride Electric (feat. Fand), This or That, Freedom Ain’t Free, Stand Up, Makin’ Waves (feat. Gaia’s Eye) 

In songs such as ‘IPCC’, Brinkman addresses the findings of the committee and even internal disagreements on projections. On songs such as ‘Greenhouse’, he takes the listener through a sonic journey of development including the greenhouse effect, predicted rise in global temperatures from Svante’s study and puts them alongside the findings of the IPCC and its accuracy. He critiques his own consumption and the paradox of being unable to individually contribute to reducing the impact of climate change without large scale policy reforms. Brinkman speaks extensively about cap and trade vs climate taxes, and the ecological debt that richer countries owe the marginalized. The album also focuses on Exxon’s failures and lies.

The album can be found at https://music.bababrinkman.com/album/the-rap-guide-to-climate-chaos

Note that the album is available for purchase at the link above.

The tracks are available for free viewing on YouTube as part of Baba Brinkman’s performance for ‘Talks At Google’. This free resource can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1ZH6R3Idb4&t=759s

Students will learn about the topic of climate change through music and learn about its current impacts.  They will also learn about the important stakeholders in climate change politics and how climate change politics plays a huge role in the development of the global economy. Students will further learn about how music can be used to discuss science based topics in order to better understand them.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? Discuss the various perceptions of climate change 
  2. Discuss climate change topics and the politics underlying the problem
  3. What is the role of fossil fuel burning in the warming of the planet?
  4. What is green capitalism?

About the tool

Tool NameThe Rap Guide To Climate Chaos
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change, Music, Rap, Hip-Hop 
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate and the Anthrosphere, Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Audio (60 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byBaba Brinkman
Hosted atBaba Brinkman Music/ Talks at Google 
LinkAlbum Link or Youtube Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Teaching Module: Poetry Writing

A classroom activity designed by the Poetry Society, UK that demonstrates techniques to write climate change poetry. This module provides a step by step guide in poetry writing. It uses Amanda Dalton’s poem ‘How to Disappear’ to draw on the theme of ‘disappearance’ which the reader can interpret on both personal levels as well as for the planet impacted by global warming. 

Students will learn techniques of poetry writing, specifically climate change poetry. They will also learn to narrate their emotions and perceptions about climate change through poetry.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the essential components of poetry?
  2. What are some things that may disappear from the Earth due to global warming?
  3. Discuss an idea for a climate change related poem.

About the Tool 

Tool NameVanishing Acts: Connecting Climate Change and Poetry 
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHelen Mort
Hosted atThe Poetry Society, UK
Linkhttps://poetryclass.poetrysociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Vanishing-Acts-Poetry-and-Climate-Change-Helen-Mort-2.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Climate Change Poems read by Celebrities

An audio resource that contains 21 poems on climate change. Compiled by UK poet laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, the resource provides audio files on themes of climate change by renowned poets, narrated by celebrities. The resource includes the following poems read by different celebrities:

  1. James Franco reads ‘Causeway’ by Matthew Hollis
  2. Jeremy Irons reads ‘Storm’ by Michael Longley 
  3. Ruth Wilson reads ‘Vertigo’ by Alice Oswald 
  4. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘Zoological Positivism Blues’ by Paul Muldoon 
  5. Michael Sheen reads ‘Scratching for Metaphor in the Somerset Coalfields’ by Sean Borodale
  6. Kelly Macdonald reads ‘Extinction’ by Jackie Kay 
  7. Maxine Peake reads ‘A Mancunian Taxi-driver Foresees His Death’ by Michael Symmons Roberts 
  8. Tamsin Greig reads ‘Last Snowman’ by Simon Armitage
  9. Iain Glen reads ‘Nostalgia’ by Don Paterson
  10. Iwan Rheon reads ‘Cantre’r Gwaelod*’ by Gillian Clarke 
  11. James Franco reads ‘Still like with Sea Pinks and High Tide’ by Maura Dooley
  12. Jeremy Irons reads ‘Turbines in January’ by Colette Bryce
  13. Ruth Wilson reads ‘Silent Sea’ by Rachael Boast
  14. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘The Solace of Artemis’ by Paula Meehan
  15. Michael Sheen reads ‘The Rhinoceros’ by Robert Minhinnick 
  16. Kelly Macdonald reads ‘X’ by Imtiaz Dharkar
  17. Maxine Peake reads ‘Doggerland’ by Jo Bell  
  18. Tamsin Greig reads ‘A Language of Change’ by David Sergeant
  19. Iain Glen reads ‘California Dreaming’ by Lachlan McKinnon
  20. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘Late Sentinels’ by Peter Fallon 
  21. James Franco reads ‘I was Born into a World’ by James Franco 

Both audio mp3 and text versions of the poems are available on the website

Students will learn about climate change through the use of poetry. They will also understand the techniques involved in writing and analysing poetry.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How is climate change portrayed in modern poetry?
  2. How do you analyse a poem? 

About the Tool 

Tool Name‘Our melting, shifting liquid world’: celebrities read poems on climate change
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry, Literature 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading, Audio
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCarol Ann Duffy
Hosted atThe Guardian
LinkAudio Link
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Dipesh Chakrabarty ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’

An essay by Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago titled ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’  that discusses the link between human history and climate change. The reading discusses the environmental history of the planet, the ‘Anthropocene’ and how humans have become geological agents with respect to climate change. Chakrabarty presents four arguments in his essay. These are 

  • Thesis 1: The distinction between natural and human history is a distinction that has to be dropped in this new era. 
  • Thesis 2 talks about the emergence of humans as a geological force and how this “severely qualifies humanist histories of modernity/ globalization”. 
  • Thesis 3: The Anthropocene requires us to put global histories of capital in conversation with the species history of humans. 
  • Thesis 4 talks about how we can probe the limits of historical understanding by the cross hatching of species history and capital history.

Students will learn about the ‘Anthropocene’ and the link between environmental history and human history. They will further understand the relationship between global histories of capital and the species history of humans.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does the crisis of climate change spell the collapse of the distinction between natural history and human history?
  2. What is the idea of the ‘Anthropocene’ and how does it qualify humanist theories of freedom?
  3. How do you reconcile the global histories of capital and the species history of humans in the Anthropocene?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Climate of History: Four Theses
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Cultural Studies, Anthropocene, Environmental History 
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDipesh Chakrabarty The Climate of History: Four Theses Critical Inquiry (Vol 35 No. 2) 
Hosted atFaculty of Law, University of Victoria, Canada
Linkhttp://www.law.uvic.ca/demcon/2013%20readings/Chakrabarty%20-%20Climate%20of%20History.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: A Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi) Syllabus

An article published by Yale Climate Connections on resources for teaching climate fiction. The article features Elizabeth Rush, a climate fiction educator at Brown University, who discusses the ways in which climate fiction can create a relationship between humans, their environment and technology. The article provides educators a list of climate fiction novels and short stories. Cli-Fi resources reviewed in the article include ‘The Tamarisk Hunter’ by Paolo Bacigalupi, ‘Gold, Fame, Citrus’ by Claire Vaye Watkins, ‘Monstro’ by Junot Díaz, ‘New York 2140’ by Kim Stanley Robinson, and ‘10:04’ by Ben Lerner.

Through the Cli-Fi books listed, students will learn about climate change and the importance of Cli-Fi. 

Use this tool and the resources listed therein to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate fiction link society, climate change and technology?
  2. How can cli-fi provide solutions to mitigate climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameWhat’s on your climate fiction syllabus?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale Climate Connections with Elizabeth Rush, Brown University 
Hosted atYale Climate Connections
Linkhttps://yaleclimateconnections.org/2018/04/whats-on-your-climate-fiction-syllabus/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Can Cli-Fi Save The Planet?

A short article by Dan Bloom in The Medium about potential ways in which climate fiction (Cli-Fi) is now helping students engage with climate change and can provide potential solutions to the crisis. In this short article, Bloom, who is thought to have coined the term ‘Cli-Fi’ discusses the increase in climate fiction in the fields of education, writing, and media across the world. 

Students will learn about Cli-Fi, and how it is helping with youth engagement in the current climate crisis. Students will further understand the importance of popular media in youth involvement for the climate movement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How can Cli-Fi impact the climate movement?
  2. Why is it important to include Cli-Fi in today’s classrooms?

About the Tool 

Tool NameCan “Cli-Fi” Help Keep Our Planet Livable?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature, Education  
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDan Bloom
Hosted atThe Medium
LinkGo To Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: What is Cli-Fi?

A video micro lecture by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, that discusses the genre of climate fiction (Cli-Fi). The video introduces this new genre of writing and includes definitions by contemporary artists, authors and filmmakers. This video further highlights new sub-genres such as ‘anthropocene fiction’ and ‘solar punk’ that have their origins in Cli-Fi.

Students will learn about the new genre of climate fiction in literature. They will also learn how authors, artists, and filmmakers portray the current global crisis and their challenges. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is climate fiction (Cli-Fi)? 
  2. How can Cli-Fi inform and provide solutions to help mitigate climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameWhat is Cli-Fi?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature, Anthropocene Fiction, Solar Punk
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (2 mins 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9XuxHtfOxQ
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: ‘The Great Derangement’: A conversation

A short discussion led by Dr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India on Amitav Ghosh’s book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’, that summarizes key points of Ghosh’s work.This video includes discussions on topics such as

  1. Why is climate change ‘unimaginable’ or ‘unthinkable’?
  2. Why does the missing narrative of climate change require the unmasking of ‘unbelievable choices’ we have made in the past?
  3. How did the rift in narrative between the human and the non-human come about? 
  4. How has the association of nature and culture evolved historically?
  5. How does Western individualism as opposed to non-Western collective values affect climate action?
  6. Why is there a need for a more philosophical approach with the contextualization of history to deal with global climate change?

Students will learn about the complex narrative of climate change and the challenges it poses to fiction. They will also learn about how non-fiction caters to a specific demographic and, therefore, the need to include climate change in fictional works to reach a wider audience. Students will also learn about the importance of using ‘realism’ as opposed to ‘surrealism’ as a way of communicating this global crisis. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why have climate change topics been underrepresented in fiction writing?
  2. What does Amitav Ghosh mean by ‘The Great Derangement’?
  3. How does the evolution of historical narratives influence contemporary narratives on climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Conversation on Amitav Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, History, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (19 min 30 sec)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr Maya Dodd with Paloma Chandrachud, FLAME University, India. Produced for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU platform
Linkhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1zF2VIWoF5_yJs_zzw5XLc42TskGhImu8/view
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on Literary Fiction

Video lectures by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this set of two video lectures, Ghosh discusses the impact of global warming and climate change on fiction. He discusses climate narratives in literary fiction and the lack of climate change narratives in contemporary literature. 

Students will understand the importance of climate change narratives in literary fiction. They will also understand the influence of climate change on everyday narratives. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss climate narratives in literary fiction.
  2. Why has the climate crisis been underrepresented in literary fiction?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, Climate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis, 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Two Video Lectures (1 hr 15 min & 1 hr 17 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago
Hosted atYouTube
LinkVideo Lecture 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW8n6RAAxTg&t=2408s
Video Lecture 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvilBabbog 
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on the Politics of Climate Change

A video lecture by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this video lecture, Ghosh discusses the politics of climate change. 

Students will understand the importance of political narratives in climate change writing. They will also learn about the parallel evolution of political narratives and rise in carbon emissions. Students will further understand why novelists often find it difficult to integrate politics and climate change in their writing. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the politics of climate change.
  2. Why is it important to discuss the evolution of political narratives and climate change?
  3. How do political movements influence literature?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePolitics, Climate Politics, Literature, Fiction
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (1 hr 15 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNoSxNTPFHU&t=8s
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on History and Climate Change

A video lecture by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this video lecture, Ghosh discusses the link between history and climate change. The video also discusses impacts of climate change on historical narratives of capitalism and imperialism in Asia. 

Students will understand the role of climate change in shaping history. They will further understand how global warming has contributed to shaping societies in the Asian continent.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between climate change and history. 
  2. Discuss how climate change influenced the history of South Asia.

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Political History, Imperialism, Colonialism,  Non-fiction, Literature, Climate Fiction
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (1 hr 13 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlKJ0r_2__Y&list=PLWEhymgNyZb8tuULW2lwe9AD5F8fOPKIV&index=20 
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change in Literary Fiction

An article by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’ in The Guardian that discusses the lack of climate change in fictional writing. The author discusses the evolution of the narrative in novels and why fiction writers have been resistant to include the topic of climate change in their work. He further discusses why novelists tend to address the topic of climate change through non-fiction since fiction derived from climate change deviates from trends of ‘gradualism’ in contemporary narratives and yet does not belong to ‘surrealism’ and ‘magic realism’ due to its nature of being ‘real’.

Students will learn about the genre of Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi) and how it differs from science fiction (Sci-Fi) . They will also learn about the evolution of narratives surrounding environmental phenomena in contemporary works of literature. Students will understand challenges that contemporary authors face when trying to write about ‘real’ topics like climate change.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi)?
  2. Discuss why climate change has not caught the collective imagination of writers.
  3. How do history, culture and politics influence works of literature?

About the tool

Tool NameAmitav Ghosh: where is the fiction about climate change?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, Climate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Non-fiction, Writing, Literary Analysis, Narrative
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh
Hosted atThe Guardian
Linkhttps://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/oct/28/amitav-ghosh-where-is-the-fiction-about-climate-change-
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic