Lesson Plan: Teaching Phenology in Plants (Leaf-out) through Climate-related Examples

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the phenology of plants, and phenological events in plants such as leaf-out.

This lesson plan allows students to understand phenology and phenological events in plants and animals. Further, the activities help students to determine the possible relationship between climate and phenological events such as leaf-out in plants. The exercises stimulate thinking about the possible impact of climate change on these periodic life-cycle events.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in the Biological Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. What is phenology?
  • 2. Name some phenological events in plants and animals.
  • 3. What are the climate-related factors that may affect leaf-out in plants?
  • 4. Which phenological events in plants could be affected by a change in the average spring temperature?

Red Maple

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline • Phenology in Plants
• Phenological Events in Plants
• Life-cycle Events in Plants
• Leaf-out in Plants
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global, USA
Languages English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate Time Required 100 – 110 min

Contents

Reading (30 – 40 min) A reading that introduces the topic of phenology, its significance, and the link between plant phenology and climate.

http://budburst.org/phenology-defined

Classroom/ Laboratory activity (~60  min) A classroom/laboratory activity to explore the possible role of climate-related environmental factors in the timing of leaf-out in plants (specifically, red maple leaf-out in New England).

https://extension.umaine.edu/signs-of-the-seasons/resources-for-educators/red-maple-leaf-out/

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1.Introduce the topic by using a reading
  • • Introduce the topic of phenology, its significance, and the link between plant phenology and climate by using the reading, “About Phenology” from Budburst, a project of Chicago Botanic Garden.
  • • The reading can be accessed at http://budburst.org/phenology-defined
  • • Discuss a few phenological events (periodic life-cycle events) in plants and animals.
2. Discuss using an online reading

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. What is Phenology?
  • 2. Name some phenological events in plants and animals.
  • 3. What are the climate-related factors that may affect leaf-out in plants?
  • 4. Which phenological events in plants could be affected by a change in the average spring temperature?

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • define phenology
  • • enumerate various phenological events in plants and animals
  • • analyze data on life-cycle events in plants
  • • interpret data on life-cycle events in plants
  • • discuss the possible link between climate and phenological events in plants
  • • discuss the potential impact of climate change on periodic life-cycle events in plants
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
1. Classroom/ Laboratory Activity Several resources for classroom/laboratory activities “Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program”, from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension: https://extension.umaine.edu/signs-of-the-seasons/resources-for-educators/
2. Visualization Visualization tool from USA National Phenology Network: https://www.usanpn.org/data/visualizations
1 Reading, “About Phenology” Budburst, a project of Chicago Botanic Garden
2 Classroom/Laboratory Activity, “The Timing of Red Maple Leaf-out” Elissa Koskela (University of Maine Cooperative Extension) and Dr. Molly Schauffler (University of Maine Climate Change Institute and RiSE Center); Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
3 Additional Resources Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program, University of Maine Cooperative Extension; USA National Phenology Network
4 Images http://wallpaperheart.com/
All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Lesson Plan: Teaching Phenology in Plants (Flowering) through Climate-related Examples

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the phenology of plants, and phenological events in plants such as flowering.

This lesson plan allows students to understand phenology and phenological events in plants and animals. Further, the activities help students to determine the possible relationship between climate and phenological events such as flowering in plants. The exercises stimulate thinking about the possible impact of climate change on these periodic life-cycle events.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in the Biological Sciences.

flying birds

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. What is Phenology?
  • 2. Name some phenological events in plants and animals.
  • 3. What are the climate-related factors that may affect the flowering of plants?
  • 4. Which phenological events in plants could be affected by an increase in the average global temperature?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline • Phenology in Plants
• Phenological Events in Plants
• Life-cycle Events in Plants
• Flowering of Plants
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global, USA
Languages English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate Time Required 90 – 130 min

Contents

Reading (20 – 30 min) A presentation (reading, discussion) that introduces the topic of phenology and its significance.

https://extension.umaine.edu/signs-of-the-seasons/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2014/08/What-is-Phenology.pptx

from the Supplemental Resources Section at https://extension.umaine.edu/signs-of-the-seasons/resources-for-educators/

Classroom/ Laboratory activity (60 – 90 min) A classroom/laboratory activity to discuss and understand the potential impacts of climate change on the phenology of plants (specifically, the bloom date of North American lilac shrubs).

http://kbsgk12project.kbs.msu.edu/blog/2012/11/06/why-fly-south-how-climate-change-alters-the-phenology-of-plants-and-animals/

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1. Introduce the topic by using a presentation/reading
2. Conduct a classroom/ laboratory activity

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. What is Phenology?
  • 2. Name some phenological events in plants and animals.
  • 3. What are the climate-related factors that may affect the flowering of plants?
  • 4. Which phenological events in plants could be affected by an increase in the average global temperature?

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • define phenology
  • • enumerate various phenological events in plants and animals
  • • analyze data on life-cycle events in plants to determine trends
  • • interpret data on life-cycle events in plants
  • • discuss the possible link between climate and phenological events in plants
  • • discuss the potential impact of climate change on periodic life-cycle events in plants

If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.

1 Classroom/Laboratory Activity Several resources for classroom/laboratory activities “Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program”, from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension:

https://extension.umaine.edu/signs-of-the-seasons/resources-for-educators/

1 Reading, “What is Phenology?” Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
2 Classroom/Laboratory Activity, “Why fly south? How climate change alters the phenology of plants and animals” Created by GK-12 Fellows Liz Schultheis and Dustin Kincaid; hosted at W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University
3 Additional Resources Signs of the Seasons: A New England Phenology Program, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
4 Images Royal Botanical Gardens Lilac Celebration Image at Wikipedia;
Nasser Akabab at Wikimedia Commons

All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Lesson Plan: Teaching Introductory Calculus (Integration) by using CO2 Emissions Data

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching topics such as integration, definite integral, area under a curve, and Riemann sum in Introductory Calculus.

This lesson plan allows students to understand Riemann sum, calculate the area under a curve using Riemann sum, and explore how this value converges to a definite integral. The activity helps students to apply the Riemann sums method for analysis and comparison of data on CO2 emission, which is considered to be a significant contributor to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. For a given function f(x) and n, calculate the left Riemann sum and right Riemann sum.
  • 2. For the same f(x) (as above) and double the value of n (from above), calculate and compare the left and right Riemann sums.
  • 3. Using Riemann sums, calculate and compare the total CO2 emissions (data records provided in the activity) for the U.S. and China from 1980 to 2015. What are the possible effects of these CO2 emissions on the Earth’s climate?

Left-handed and Right-handed Riemann sums of an increasing function

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline • Calculus, Integration
• Definite Integral
• Area under a Curve
• Riemann Sum
Climate Topic •  Energy, Economics, and Climate Change
• Climate and the Anthroposphere
• Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Location USA and China
Languages English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate Time Required 90 – 120 min

Contents

Reading and Associated Activity

(30 – 60 min)

A reading that introduces Riemann sum and the types of Riemann sums. It describes the calculation of the area under a curve by using Riemann sum, and explains how this value can converge to the definite integral.
https://mathinsight.org/calculating_area_under_curve_riemann_sums
Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(~60 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to analyze CO2 emissions data for the U.S. and China by using Riemann sums for the calculation of area under the curve.
http://sustainabilitymath.org/calculus-materials/
Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1. Introduce the topic by using a reading and an associated activity
2. Conduct Classroom/ Laboratory activity (~60 min)
  • • Then, help your students apply the learned concepts through a hands-on classroom/laboratory activity, “U.S. and China CO2 Emissions”, by Thomas J. Pfaff at Sustainability Math. This activity uses CO2 emission data and population data for the U.S. and China for the period 1980 to 2015.
  • • This activity will help students to
  • • analyze CO2 emissions for each country
  • •  compare the CO2 emissions for the countries by using Riemann sums for the data from 1980 to 2015
  • •  create a proposal for emission reduction by considering past and current CO2 emissions for the two countries
  • •  Go to http://sustainabilitymath.org/calculus-materials/
  • • Download the material in the project, “U.S. and China CO2 Emissions”, under Calculus I – Integration Related Projects.
  • •  Students can perform the exercises described in the Word file by using the data in the Excel file.

 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. For a given function f(x) and n, calculate the left Riemann sum and right Riemann sum.
  • 2. For the same f(x) (as above) and double the value of n (from above), calculate and compare the left and right Riemann sums.
  • 3. Using Riemann sums, calculate and compare the total CO2 emissions (data records provided in the activity) for the U.S. and China from 1980 to 2015. What are the possible effects of these CO2 emissions on the Earth’s climate?

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • calculate the approximate area under a curve by using the Riemann sums method
  • • compare the results obtained for left and right Riemann sums for the same curve
  • • explain how the estimate of the area under a curve (using Riemann sum) converges to the definite integral
  • • apply the Riemann sum method to analyze and compare CO2 emissions data for the U.S. and China
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
Videos Video tutorial, “Riemann sums”, from Khan Academy: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/old-integral-calculus/riemann-sums-ic
1 Reading and Associated Activity, “Calculating the area under a curve using Riemann sums” D. Q. Nykamp from Math Insight
2 Classroom/Laboratory Activity, “U.S. and China CO2 Emissions” Thomas J. Pfaff , Sustainability Math
3 Additional Resources Khan Academy
4. Images https://matplotlib.org/gallery/showcase/integral.html https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1180034/inequality-and-integral
All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Integral as the area under a curve

Lesson Plan: Teaching Cost-Benefit Analysis through Climate-related examples

As an undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching cost-benefit analysis.

This lesson plan will help students to understand the principles of cost-benefit analysis. The activities will allow students to apply cost-benefit analysis to global climate change, in general, and to carbon abatement (an action to mitigate climate change).

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

Cost Benefit Analysis

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. Explain the principles of cost-benefit analysis
  • 2. What are the possible limitations of measuring the costs of climate change in terms of the GDP?
  • 3. How can cost-benefit analysis be applied to carbon emissions abatement?

Global Greenhouse Gas Abatement Cost Curve for 2030

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline
  • • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • • Carbon Abatement
  • • Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Climate Topic
  • • Energy, Economics, and Climate Change
  • • Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
  • • Mitigation
Location Global
Languages English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate Time Required 150 – 180 min

Contents

Reading (20 – 30 min) A reading that introduces the principles of cost-benefit analysis.

http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/cba.htm

Reading (~45 – 60 min) A reading to discuss the economic analysis of climate change and specifically, cost-benefit studies of global climate change.

Ch. 2 (Economic Analysis of Climate Change), pg. 15-25 (Cost-Benefit Studies of Global Climate Change) http://www.ase.tufts.edu/gdae/education_materials/modules/The_Economics_of_Global_Climate_Change.pdf

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(~80 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to perform cost-benefit analysis of carbon emissions abatement.

https://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/teaching_materials/carbon_emissions/unit5.html

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits
Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.
1.Introduce the topic by using a reading
2.Discuss the topic in more detail by using another reading
3. Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity
 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. Explain the principles of cost-benefit analysis
  • 2. What are the possible limitations of measuring the costs of climate change in terms of the GDP?
  • 3. How can cost-benefit analysis be applied to carbon emissions abatement?

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • describe cost-benefit analysis
  • • apply cost-benefit analysis to global climate change
  • • apply cost-benefit analysis to carbon emissions abatement
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
Micro-lecture (video) A micro-lecture (video), “Quantifying the Economic Cost of Climate Change”, delivered by Solomon M. Hsiang, Climate Risk Expert and U.C. Berkeley Professor of Public Policy, from RMSConnection: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNYZJD_llno
1 Reading, “An Introduction to Cost Benefit Analysis” Thayer Watkins, Department of Economics, San Jose State University
2 Reading, “Economic Analysis of Climate Change: Cost-Benefit Studies of Global Climate Change” from “The Economics of Global Climate Change” Jonathan M. Harris, Brian Roach, and Anne-Marie Codur, Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University
3 Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Abating Carbon Emissions” Gautam Sethi (Bard College), Curt Gervich (SUNY Plattsburgh), and Robyn Smyth (Bard College); available on SERC’s InTeGrate portal
4 Additional Resources Solomon M. Hsiang, Climate Risk Expert and U.C. Berkeley Professor of Public Policy; from RMSConnection
5 Images http://www.ase.tufts.edu/gdae/education_materials/modules/The_Economics_of_Global_Climate_Change.pdf
All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Lesson Plan: Teaching the Tragedy of the Commons using Climate Change

As an undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the concept of the tragedy of the commons.

This lesson plan will help students to understand the concept of tragedy of the commons, and to identify the “commons” and the “tragedy” in some example problems. In the activity, students will examine climate change as a tragedy of the commons and will discuss possible economic solutions (policy, development) for the problem.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a topic in Economics.

Introduction to Tragedy of Commons

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. Describe the concept of tragedy of the commons.
  • 2. Discuss climate change as a tragedy-of-the-commons problem. Identify the “commons” and the “tragedy”.
  • 3. Explain why “atmospheric sinks for greenhouse gases” can be considered as a “commons”.
  • 4. Discuss different types of governance solutions for climate change as a tragedy of the commons. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each type of solution.

Understanding Tragedy of the Commons using Climate Change

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline • Tragedy of the Commons
• The Economics of Climate Change
Climate Topic • Energy, Economics, and Climate
• Policy, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Location Global
Languages English
Access Online , Offline
Approximate Time Required 120 min

Contents

Micro-lecture (video)

(~11 min)

A micro-lecture (video) that introduces the concept of tragedy of the commons and provides examples to explain the terms “tragedy” and “commons”.

https://www.coursera.org/lecture/sustainability/tragedy-of-the-commons-MtxUU

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(~50 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to further understand tragedy of the commons through case studies, discuss “Earth’s atmosphere” as a commons and “global warming” as a tragedy, and propose solutions to solve this tragedy-of-the-commons problem.

https://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/programs/implementation/program2/activities/135953.html

Reading (~60 min) A reading that discusses climate changeas a tragedy-of-the-commons problem (atmospheric sinks for greenhouse gases are the commons), provides an overview of current climate change governance, and describes polycentric governance strategies to address global climate change at various levels and scales.

https://www.lincolninst.edu/sites/default/files/pubfiles/climate-change_0.pdf

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1.Introduce the topic through a micro-lecture (video)
  • • Play the micro-lecture “Tragedy of the Commons”to introduce the concept of tragedy of the commons.
  • • The micro-lecture (video) “Tragedy of the Commons”, delivered by Dr. Jonathan Tomkin, from the Introduction to Sustainability course by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is available on Coursera at https://www.coursera.org/lecture/sustainability/tragedy-of-the-commons-MtxUU.
  • • Guide a brief discussionamong students to cite other examples of the tragedy of the commons problem,andto identify the “commons” and the “tragedy” in each example.
2. Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity
3. Discuss solutions through a reading
  • •  Read “Climate Change: The Ultimate Tragedy of the Commons” by Jouni Paavola in “Property in Land and Other Resources”, edited by Daniel H. Cole and Elinor Ostrom, Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, pp. 417-433.
  • • The reading “Climate Change: The Ultimate Tragedy of the Commons” is available at https://www.lincolninst.edu/sites/default/files/pubfiles/climate-change_0.pdf.
  • •  This reading describes climate change as a tragedy of the commons problem (atmospheric sinks for greenhouse gases are the commons) and analyzes the current state of climate change governance.It alsodiscussespolycentricity as a governance approach to address global climate change at various levels and scales, providing specific examples ofthe Cities for Climate Change program and the Cement Sustainability Initiative.

 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. Describe the concept of tragedy of the commons.
  • 2. Discuss climate change as a tragedy-of-the-commons problem. Identify the “commons” and the “tragedy”.
  • 3. Explain why “atmospheric sinks for greenhouse gases” can be considered as a “commons”.
  • 4. Discuss different types of governance solutions for climate change as a tragedy of the commons. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each type of solution.

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to :

  • • describe tragedy of the commons
  • • provide examples of tragedy-of-the-commons problems
  • • identify the commons and the tragedy in a given tragedy-of-the-commons problem
  • • examine climate change as a tragedy-of-the-commons problem
  • • propose economic solutions (policy, development) for the climate change tragedy-of-the-commons

If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.

1 Micro-lecture (video) A micro-lecture (video), “Tragedy of the Commons: Solutions”, delivered by Dr. Jonathan Tomkin, from the Introduction to Sustainability course by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, on Coursera:

https://www.coursera.org/lecture/sustainability/tragedy-of-the-commons-solutions-wBRcA

1 Micro-lecture, “Tragedy of the Commons” Dr. Jonathan Tomkin, Introduction to Sustainability course by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, on Coursera
2 Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Introducing the economic concept of ‘tragedy of the commons’ using global warming” Laura Triplett, Gustavus Adolphus College; available on SERC’s InTeGrate portal
3 Reading, “Climate Change: The Ultimate Tragedy of the Commons” Jouni Paavola in “Property in Land and Other Resources”, edited by Daniel H. Cole and Elinor Ostrom, Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, pp. 417-433; https://www.lincolninst.edu/
4 Additional Resources Dr. Jonathan Tomkin, Introduction to Sustainability course by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, on Coursera
5 Images 1. Laura Triplett, Gustavus Adolphus College; Gustavus Adolphus College, Geology

2. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3458638/posts

3. https://www.freeimages.com/search/cows-grazing

All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Lesson Plan: Teaching “Climate Change and Food Security” and “Climate Change and Agriculture”

As a high school or undergraduate Social Sciences or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching topics such as Food Security, Agriculture, Climate Change and Food Security, and Climate Change and Agriculture.

This lesson plan helps students understand the various aspects of food security, and the challenges faced in food security and agriculture at different locations across the world. The activities explore the two-way relationship between agriculture and climate: the impact of food production on the climate, and the possible effects of climate change on agricultural production through location-specific examples.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Social Sciences or Environmental Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. Define food security.
  • 2. What are the climate-related factors that influence crop yield?
  • 3. How might agricultural practices and livestock farming contribute to climate change?
  • 4. How could climate change affect global food security?
  • 5. Identify actions that could reduce the impact of food production on climate change.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline • Food Security, Agriculture
• Climate Change and Food Security
• Climate and the Food System
• Climate Change and Agriculture
Climate Topic • Climate and Food
• Climate Change and Food Security
• Climate Change and Agriculture
Location Global, Africa
Languages English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate Time Required 90 – 130 min

Contents

Micro-lectures (video) (~26 min) Two micro-lectures that introduce the concept of food security, explain the factors that impact food security globally, and provide examples to explain the link between food production and climate change.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/future-of-energy/lecture/5nlWc/climate-change-and-food-security-part-1

https://www.coursera.org/learn/future-of-energy/lecture/cdxIG/climate-change-and-food-security-part-2

Teaching Module (high school) (~55 min)

OR

For high-school level:

A teaching module to explain the relationship between the food system and climate change, and to determine actions that can reduce the impact of the food system on climate change.

http://www.foodspanlearning.org/_pdf/lesson-plan/unit2/lesson5-climate-lessonplan.pdf

http://www.foodspanlearning.org/_pdf/lesson-plan/unit2/lesson5-climate-slides.pdf

http://www.foodspanlearning.org/_pdf/lesson-plan/unit2/lesson5-climate-handoutsandguides.pdf

Classroom/ Laboratory activity (undergraduate) (~90 min) For undergraduate level:

A classroom/laboratory activity that uses the example of cocoa production in Africa to help students explore suitable climatic conditions for a crop and to determine how climate change may affect food production.

https://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/teaching_materials/food_security/unit3.html

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1.Introduce the topic by playing two micro-lectures (videos)
2. Conduct the activities in a teaching module

(high- school level)

OR

2. Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity

(undergraduate level)

  • • For undergraduate level:
  • • Next, explore the topic further though a hands-on activity, “Climate Change and Food Security”, compiled by Russanne Low (Institute for Global Environmental Strategies), Rebecca Boger (Brooklyn College), and Amy E. Potter (Armstrong State University).
  • • In this activity, students will learn about the relationship between climate change and food production through the case study of cocoa production in Africa. They will create maps by using the ArcGIS Online tool.
  • • Go to https://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/teaching_materials/food_security/unit3.html
  • • Download the teaching materials available.
  • • Conduct the activities described in the Study Unit.

 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • • Define food security.
  • • What are the climate-related factors that influence crop yield?
  • • How might agricultural practices and livestock farming contribute to climate change?
  • • How could climate change affect global food security?
  • • Identify actions that could reduce the impact of food production on climate change

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • define food security
  • • identify the climate-related factors that affect food production and crop yield
  • • discuss how crop production may cause climate change
  • • discuss how climate change may impact agriculture
  • • propose actions that may reduce the footprint of the food system on climate change
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
Reading
1. Micro-lectures, “Climate Change and Food Security Part 1” and “Climate Change and Food Security Part 2” Jennifer Burney, “Our Energy Future”, a course by University of California San Diego, hosted on Coursera
2. Teaching module, “Our Changing Climate” Foodspan initiative of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
3. Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Climate Change and Food Security” Russanne Low (Institute for Global Environmental Strategies), Rebecca Boger (Brooklyn College), and Amy E. Potter (Armstrong State University); available on the InTeGrate portal of SERC Carleton
4. Additional Resources Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations
5. Images http://newz.ug/climate-change-prolonged-drought-to-dim-east-africas-growth/

https://foodsecurityindex.eiu.com/ 

All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Global Food Security Index

GFSI

Lesson Plan: Teaching Human Health and Climate Change

As a high school Biology / Biological Sciences and Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about human health and diseases, vectors and vector-borne diseases such as malaria.

This lesson plan allows students to study the geographical distribution and spread of diseases. Further, students can explore how climate change could impact the spread of vector-borne diseases (specifically, malaria) and could consequently affect human health outcomes. The activity will also help students to identify policies for adapting to and mitigating the spread of diseases.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in the Biological Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. What are the major vector-borne diseases and their symptoms? What is the current geographical distribution of these diseases globally?
  • 2. Explain whether climate-related factors could influence the distribution and spread of vector-borne diseases.
  • 3. How could an increase in the average global temperature affect the geographical distribution of malaria?
  • 4. Recommend specific actions/policies that can help in mitigating the spread of vector-borne diseases caused by a rise in average global temperature, increase in sea-levels, and growth in population.
Malaria

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School
Discipline Biological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline • Protozoa, Vectors, Vector-borne Diseases
• Malaria,  Climate Change and the Spread of Malaria
• Climate Change and Human Health
Climate Topic Climate and Health
Location Global, USA
Languages English
Access Online (some material can be downloaded for offline use)
Approximate Time Required 150-190 min

Contents

Reading (20 – 30 min) A reading that provides an overview of vectors and vector-borne diseases.

http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/vector-borne-diseases

Video (~8 min) A video that explains the potential impact of climate change on disease vectors and the spread of diseases, and consequently, on human health outcomes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDueuwB3Tcs

Classroom/ Laboratory activity (60 – 90 min) A classroom/laboratory activity to examine maps on malaria distribution, study temperature data, establish potential links between disease distribution and temperature, and predict the effect of climate change on disease distribution.

https://www.strategies.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Mosquitoes_May02.pdf

Game (computer-based) (~60 min) A computer-based game to help students understand the impact of climate on health, identify diseases, and choose actions or policies for adapting to and mitigating the spread of diseases.

http://playgen.com/play/climate-health-impact/

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1. Introduce the topic with the help of a reading
  • • The reading, “Vector-borne diseases”, is a fact sheet from the World Health Organization (WHO), and is available at: http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/vector-borne-diseases
  • • With the help of the reading, “Vector-borne diseases”, introduce the topic of vector-borne diseases and the factors that influence their distribution and spread.
  • • Proceed to explain malaria (or another vector-borne disease) and its transmission.
  • • Discuss the environmental conditions that are conducive for the spread of malaria (or another vector-borne disease).
2. Play a video
3. Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity 
4. Facilitate a game-based activity
  • • Students can play the computer-based game “Climate Health Impact”, from Big Picture/Playgen, for an interactive experience.
  • • This game will enable students to understand the possible effects of climate change on human health in different regions of the world, to identify diseases from their symptoms, and to explore measures (specifically, policies) for adaptation and mitigation:
  • • Download the resources for teachers (including an introduction and a homework sheet) from https://bigpictureeducation.com/climate-health-impact-game
  • • Go to http://playgen.com/play/climate-health-impact/
  • • Conduct the game-based activity by using the guidelines in the “Teacher Notes”.
  • • Note: This game requires a Flash player; therefore, it may not play in some browsers. The game works in Firefox.

 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:
  • • What are the major vector-borne diseases and their symptoms? What is the current geographical distribution of these diseases globally?
  • • Explain whether climate-related factors influence the distribution and spread of vector-borne diseases.
  • • How could an increase in the average global temperature affect the geographical distribution of malaria?
  • • Recommend specific actions/policies that can help in mitigating the spread of vector-borne diseases caused by a rise in average global temperature, increase in sea-levels, and growth in population.

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • enumerate some vectors and the diseases that they cause
  • • discuss the causes for the spread of vector-borne diseases
  • • explain the possible link between climate change and the distribution/spread of infectious vector-borne diseases
  • • discuss climate change-related actions and policies that will help in adapting to and mitigating the spread of vector-borne diseases
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
1 Reading A reading, “Climate Change and Infectious Diseases”, from the World Health Organization (WHO): http://www.who.int/globalchange/environment/en/chapter6.pdf
2 Video A video, “What is the role of climate change in disease emergence?”, from the course, “Epidemics – the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases”, by the Pennsylvania State University: https://www.coursera.org/learn/epidemics/lecture/2EXqq/what-is-the-role-of-climate-change-in-disease-emergence
1 Reading, “Vector-borne diseases World Health Organization (WHO)
2 Video, “Human Health, Vector-Borne Diseases, and Climate Change” UCARConnect, Mary Hayden and Andy Monaghan from the National Center for Atmospheric Research
3 Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Beyond the Bite: Mosquitoes and Malaria” Institute for Global Environmental Strategies
4 Game (computer-based), “Climate Health Impact” Big Picture/Playgen
5 Additional Resources World Health Organization; Coursera (course by The Pennsylvania State University)
6 Images https://www.strategies.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Mosquitoes_May02.pdf
All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

Lesson Plan: Teaching Carbon Cycle through Climate-related Examples

As a high school or undergraduate Chemistry or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching topics in environmental chemistry such as the carbon cycle or biogeochemical cycles.

This lesson plan allows students to understand the carbon cycle, its components, and the flow among the different components of this biogeochemical cycle. The activity will introduce the link between the carbon cycle and climate. It will also explore how human activity (such as increased fossil fuel use) may affect the natural carbon cycle, and may thus cause climate-related changes.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry.

Carbon Cycle by UCAR

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  • 1. What is the role of weathering of rocks in the carbon cycle? What are the chemical reactions in this process?
  • 2. Which components in the carbon cycle act as carbon sinks?
  • 3. If fossil fuel usage increases, what would be the effect on the different carbon sinks? What would be the possible changes in the Earth’s climate?
  • 4. What are the possible impacts of deforestation on the natural carbon cycle? How might these changes affect the Earth’s climate?

Carbon Cycle by IPCC

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry
Topic(s) in Discipline • Environmental Chemistry
• Carbon Cycle
• Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate Topic Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Location Global
Languages English
Access Online
Approximate Time Required 120-160 min

Contents

Interactive diagram (~30 min) An interactive diagram that introduces the global carbon cycle, its components, and the flow among the various components through video clips and images.
https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/image_maps/3-carbon-cycle
Reading (20 – 30 min) A reading that provides an overview of the carbon cycle, and explains the link between the carbon cycle and the Earth’s climate.

http://www.columbia.edu/~vjd1/carbon.htm

Classroom/ Laboratory activity
(Simulation and associated exercises) (60 – 90 min)
A classroom/laboratory activity using an interactive simulation and associated exercises to explore and analyze how human activities may affect the natural carbon cycle, and to discuss the potential effects on the Earth’s climate.
https://www.learner.org/courses/envsci/interactives/carbon/index.php
Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits
Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.
1.Introduce the topic through an interactive diagram
  • • Introduce the topic of the global carbon cycle by using the interactive diagram “Carbon Cycle”, from the Science Learning Hub (New Zealand).
  • • Students can observe the components of the carbon cycle and observe the flow among these parts. They can interact with the components by clicking on them to learn more details.
  • • The interactive tool, “Carbon Cycle”, can be accessed at https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/image_maps/3-carbon-cycle
2. Read about the topic
3. Conduct a classroom/ laboratory activity
 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • 1. What is the role of weathering of rocks in the carbon cycle? What are the chemical reactions in this process?
  • 2. Which components in the carbon cycle act as carbon sinks?
  • 3. If fossil fuel usage increases, what would be the effect on the different carbon sinks? What would be the possible changes in the Earth’s climate?
  • 4. What are the possible impacts of deforestation on the natural carbon cycle? How might these changes affect the Earth’s climate?

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • describe the global carbon cycle and its components
  • • explain the flow among the components in the carbon cycle
  • • discuss the role of the carbon cycle in climate
  • • analyze and discuss the impact of human activities (such as the use of fossil fuels) on CO2 levels in the carbon cycle
  • • predict the possible effects of excess carbon in the system on the Earth’s climate
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
Video A short video, “The carbon cycle”, from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8Y6L5TI_94
Model A carbon cycle model in InsightMaker, “The Carbon Cycle”, as initially proposed by Bill White of Cornell University, adapted and created by France Caron: https://insightmaker.com/insight/79473/Global-Carbon-Cycle
Interactive model An interactive model of the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle, “Land Carbon Budget with Growing Plants & Three Decomposing Pools,” from the Denning Research Group at Colorado State University: http://biocycle.atmos.colostate.edu/shiny/Land/
1 Interactive diagram, “Carbon Cycle" The Science Learning Hub, New Zealand
2 Reading, “The Carbon Cycle and Earth’s Climate” Columbia University (New York)
3 Classroom/Laboratory activity The Habitable Planet from Annenberg Learner
4 Additional Resources The World Meteorological Organization (WMO); Bill White (Cornell University) and France Caron; Denning Research Group (Colorado State University)
5 Images https://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg1/en/ch7s7-3.html https://scied.ucar.edu/imagecontent/carbon-cycle-diagram https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonCycle/
All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

The Fast carbon cycle

Lesson Plan: Teaching about Hazards and Disasters through Climate-related Examples (Sea-Level Rise and Flooding due to Melting of Polar Ice)

As a high school or undergraduate Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching topics such as Hazards, and Disasters: Natural and Man-made.
This lesson plan allows students to understand how the melting of polar ice due to climate change can result in an increase in sea levels globally. The activity will also allow students to examine real data on sea-level rise, determine the reasons for climate change-related flooding, and visualize the effects of such flooding on vulnerable coastal regions.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography or Earth Sciences.

Changes in Global Sea Level

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  •  1.  Name the largest glaciers (in terms of volume) in the world.
  •  2.  What would be the impact of the melting of large glaciers on coastal locations across the world?
  •  3. What are the factors that determine the vulnerability of a coastline to flooding caused by rising sea levels?
  •  4. What is the likely impact of a sea-level rise of 100 cm on San Francisco and Los Angeles?

Our Coast Our Future

Flood

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Discipline Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline • Hazards, Disasters: Natural and Man-made
• Sea-level Rise
• Floods
• Melting of Polar Ice due to Climate Change
Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards
Location United States, California
Languages English
Access Online
Approximate Time Required 140 – 200 min

Contents

Classroom/Laboratory Activity (60 – 90 min) A classroom/laboratory activity that introduces the relationship between climate and the cryosphere, explains how sea-level rise can be predicted (based on average global temperature change), and triggers a discussion on the potential impacts of sea-level rise.

https://serc.carleton.edu/eslabs/cryosphere/6b.html

Video (~7 min) A video to discuss the social and economic impacts of rising sea levels.
http://www.nbclearn.com/changingplanet/cuecard/53460
Classroom/Laboratory Activity (undergraduate level) (~90 min)

OR

Visualization (high-school level) (60 – 90 min)

For undergraduate level:
A classroom/laboratory activity to examine and analyze sea-level change data and shoreline response for the coast of California.
https://serc.carleton.edu/sp/ssac/national_parks/examples/35176.html

OR

For high-school level:
An interactive visualization to visualize the effect of different amounts of sea-level rise and various storm scenarios on the coast of California.
http://data.pointblue.org/apps/ocof/cms/
http://data.pointblue.org/apps/ocof/cms/index.php?page=flood-map

Step-by-Step User Guide
Questions/Assignments
Learning Outcomes
Additional Resources
Credits

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1. Introduce the topic through a classroom/laboratory activity

 

2. Play a video
3. Conduct a Classroom/Laboratory Activity (undergraduate level) (~90 min) 

OR

Conduct an activity based on an interactive visualization (high-school level)

 

  • • For undergraduate level:
  • • Next, explore the topic through a hands-on classroom/laboratory activity, “Mapping Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise at Point Reyes National Seashore”, developed by Len Vacher, University of South Florida.
  • • In this activity, students will examine actual data for sea-level change, and will perform data analysis and calculations in MS Excel to determine coastal vulnerability and shoreline response to sea-level rise.
  • • Download the teaching material (module) available at https://serc.carleton.edu/sp/ssac/national_parks/examples/35176.html
  • • Conduct the activity described in the PowerPoint presentation (module).
  • • OR
  • • For high-school level:
  • •  Next, explore the topic in an interactive and engaging manner by using the visualization (maps and tools), “OCOF Our Coast Our Future Flood Map”, developed by the CoSMoS project team.
  • • Access the visualization at http://data.pointblue.org/apps/ocof/cms/index.php?page=flood-map
  • • Facilitate an activity in which students can change the amounts of sea-level rise and storm scenario frequency, and observe the corresponding effects for specific locations on the coast of California.
  • • Compare and discuss various flooding scenarios and the vulnerability of different locations.

 

Use the tools and the concepts learned so far to discuss and determine answers to the following questions:

  • •  Name the largest glaciers (in terms of volume) in the world
  • • What would be the impact of the melting of large glaciers on coastal locations across the world?
  • • What are the factors that determine the vulnerability of a coastline to flooding caused by rising sea levels?
  • • What is the likely impact of a sea-level rise of 100 cm on San Francisco and Los Angeles?

 

The tools in this lesson plan will enable students to:

  • • describe the relationship between climate and the cryosphere, and the possible impact of an increase in average global temperature on sea levels
  • •  explain sea-level rise and the reasons for the rise
  • • discuss the factors that determine the vulnerability of coastal regions to inundation caused by rising sea-levels
If you or your students would like to explore the topic further, these additional resources will be useful.
Sea Level Rise Simulation at Sea Level Change Portal A simulation that explores the impact of collapsing polar ice sheets (Greenlandand Antarctica) and their impact on global mean sea level rise, along with shrinkage in livable area around the world. Available at https://sealevel.nasa.gov/vesl/web/sea-level/slr-eustatic/
Mobile App A mobile app, “Polar Explorer: Sea Level”, from Columbia University: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/polar-explorer-sea-level/id1056414420
1 Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Future of the Cryosphere: Sea Level Rise” EarthLabs at Science Education Resource Center (SERC), Carleton College
2 Video, “Rising Sea Levels” NBC Learn’s Changing Planet
3 Classroom/Laboratory activity, “Mapping Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise at Point Reyes National Seashore” Len Vacher, University of South Florida; available at SERC Carleton
4 Visualization, “OCOF Our Coast Our Future Flood Map” Our Coast Our Future (OCOF)
5 Additional Resources Columbia University

https://sealevel.nasa.gov/vesl/web/sea-level/slr-eustatic/

6 Images https://www.globalchange.gov/browse/multimedia/past-and-projected-changes-global-sea-level-rise

 

http://data.pointblue.org/apps/ocof/cms/index.php?page=flood-map

https://serc.carleton.edu/sp/ssac/national_parks/examples/35176.html

John Green /San Jose Mercury News, File, The Mercury News

All the teaching tools and images  in our collated list are owned by the corresponding creators/authors/organizations as  listed on their websites. Please view the individual copyright and ownership details for each tool by following the individual links provided. We have selected and analyzed the tools that align with the overall objective of our project and have provided the corresponding links. We do not claim ownership of or responsibility/liability for any of the listed tools.

California coast ocean level

Mapping Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise