Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Human Migration and Displacement

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on human migration and displacement caused by climate change. It describes the impacts of climate change on voluntary and forced human migration and displacement through examples from South Asia, the Middle East and western China.

Students will learn about the key drivers and impacts of climate change that influence migration and displacement. They will also understand the role of climate change in increasing the likelihood of regional conflict. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect migration and displacement?
  2. What are the reasons behind involuntary and voluntary migration and displacement?
  3. What are the four drivers of migration that result from climate change?
  4. What role does climate change play in the likelihood of regional conflict?

About the Tool 

Tool NameMigration and Displacement in a Changing Climate
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Migration, Displacement, Conflict, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal, South Asia, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, China 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRobert McLeman in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/12_migration-and-displacement.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Geopolitics of Climate Change

This podcast is a dialogue between Bruno Latour and Dipesh Chakrabarty on the geopolitics of climate change. It includes a critical discussion on the underlying politics of what is considered scientific ‘facts’ today and its relationship to the current climate change discourse. This tool also includes discussion on different political science theories and schools of philosophical thought as related to climate science.

Students will learn about the politics of climate denial and how concepts such as ‘wicked universality’ and ‘exhaustion of modernisation’ are being utilized in the current climate change discourse. Students will also learn about issues related to climate justice and climate inequality based on geopolitics. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the geopolitics of climate change.
  2. Can scientific ‘facts’ on climate change be trusted when making policy decisions on climate change?
  3. What is ‘wicked universality’ and how is it finding its way in the current climate discourse?
  4. Discuss how ‘exhaustion of modernisation’ and current capitalist theories may not provide a solution to the climate crisis.

About the Tool

Tool Name Bruno Latour and Dipesh Chakrabarty: Geopolitics and the “Facts” of Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, International Relations, Political Science
Topic(s) in Discipline Geopolitics, Political Theory, Wicked Universality, Industrial Revolution, Capitalism, Extraction Economies
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Audio (70 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Critical Inquiry
Hosted at WB202: the Critical Inquiry Podcast
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Climate Change, Infectious Disease and International Conflict

A reading that discusses the impact of climate change on health, security and international conflict. It discusses how climate change can cause the spread of vector-borne disease across geopolitical borders and thus lead to security issues and conflict. 

Students will learn about the interlinkages between climate change and global health. They will be introduced to ‘Health Security’ and how it is impacted due to extreme weather events and natural disasters.  Students will further understand the role of climate change and global health in disease transmission across geopolitical borders and potential security issues such as migration, refugee crises and human rights that may arise from it. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How are climate change, health and security interconnected? Discuss how this interlinkage can lead to political instability and international conflict.
  2. How has climate change caused the spread of vector-borne and infectious diseases? 
  3. Discuss potential security issues that will arise from climate change.
Tool Name Health and Climate Security: Interconnected Security Challenges of Climate Change and Infectious Disease
Discipline Social Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in Discipline Health Security, Geopolitics, National Security, Peace and Conflict Studies, Human Migration, Refugee, Infectious Disease
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance, Climate and Society, Climate and Health
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Kaleem Hawa in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted at The Center for Climate and Security
Link Health Security PDF
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Video: Chomsky on Tackling Climate Change

An interview with Noam Chomsky on activism, organisational behaviour, power structures, privilege and propaganda related to the climate crisis. The interview includes his views on the struggles of the climate movement and strategies to tackle the issue. 

Students will learn about the climate change movement, its history and its current state. They will understand the importance of power structures in organisational behaviour for the movement. Students will further learn about political propaganda in the climate discourse. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the climate change movement.
  2. According to Chomsky, why does the climate change movement lack response?
  3. How does privilege, power and propaganda influence the climate change discourse?
  4. How does climate change affect inequality between groups?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky on Using Activism to Confront Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Sociology, Political Science, Climate Activism, Inequality, Political Propaganda
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video (23 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Kevin Caners, Interviewer- The Elephant Podcast
Hosted at The Elephant Podcast on Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Game: Understanding Climate Vulnerabilities and Building Climate Resilience

A game that provides an immersive learning experience to visualize the possible effects of climate change on our cities and neighborhoods in the future, and to explore actions for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Conflict and water wars

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Climate Change and Children

An audio conversation between Caroline Hickman, psychotherapist and climate psychology lecturer at University of Bath, and host Verity Sharp about the methods of engaging children and young people in discussions surrounding climate change and ecological crisis.

Students will learn about the various methods in therapy of engaging children in climate change discussion while being mindful of climate change led trauma. Additionally, they will learn how to guide parents in their anxiety and fear of exposing their children to the climate crisis, and learn methods in which parents can be assisted to not burden their child with the information and responsibility.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate psychology?
  2. How does climate change affect children and young people?
  3. What are the methods of engaging children in climate change discussion?

About the Tool

Tool Name Talking with Children about Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Psychotherapy, Child Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Anxiety, Fear, Trauma
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Climate and Health
Type of Tool Audio (37 mins)
Grade Level Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation None
Developed by Climate Psychology Alliance
Hosted at Climate Psychology Alliance
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Audio: Climate Psychology and Psychotherapy

An audio interview by the Climate Psychology Alliance (CPA) of Paul Hoggett, Director of the Centre for Psycho- Social Studies at the University of the West of England and cofounder of CPA, and Caroline Hickman, climate psychology lecturer at University of Bath and psychotherapist, with host Verity Sharpon on climate psychology and psychotherapy. This interview discusses the importance of climate change conversations in psychotherapy and the practice of deep listening in therapy.

Students will be introduced to deep listening practices in psychotherapy such as non-judgemental listening, listening with respect and compassion, noticing the use of metaphors and imagery, noticing contradictions and silences, and asking open-ended questions. They will also be introduced to the two types of climate denials – soft denial and hard denial, and the role of ‘modelling’ in climate psychotherapy. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate psychology?
  2. What is ‘deep listening’ and how can it be used in psychotherapy?
  3. What are soft and hard climate denials? Discuss how to approach climate denial through psychotherapy.

About the Tool

Tool Name Podcast: What is Climate Psychology? A Way of Listening…
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Psychotherapy, Deep Listening, Climate Denial, Modelling
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of Tool Audio (45 mins)
Grade Level Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation None
Developed by Climate Psychology Alliance (hosted by Verity Sharp)
Hosted at Climate Psychology Alliance
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/ Microlecture: The Wiring of Our Brain

A video titled ‘Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall, author and founder of Climate Outreach and Information Network, that focuses on how the human brain is wired to ignore climate change even though it is such a critical problem. Marshall discusses how the human brain tends to respond to threats that are direct, visible, immediate and have a defined ‘enemy’ and how climate change impacts are none of those things. He further discusses how this creates psychological barriers that prevent future climate change action. 

Students will learn about the various psychological factors and mechanisms that cause humans to ignore climate change and its impacts. They will also learn that only when we understand what motivates, excites and threatens us, will we be able to make sense of the reality of the current climate crisis. Students will further learn why behavioural psychology is important in better understanding climate change and for climate change actions and solutions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is behavioural psychology?
  2. What are some of the psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  3. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameDon’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (55 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGeorge Marshall at Talks at Google
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video : Behavioral psychology and climate change

A video lecture that discusses behavioural psychological responses to climate change. It focuses on individual lifestyle decisions which are influenced by capitalism, technology advancement, politics, social perceptions and personal gain and benefit; and how this further affects their behavioural responses to climate change.     

Students will learn about behaviourism, consumerism and climate change. They will understand aspects of classical conditioning and behaviourism such as optimisation and rationalization and their importance in individual decision making. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss behavioural psychological responses to climate change
  2. Discuss the link between individual decision making and the seven barriers of sustainability
  3. How does classical conditioning affect individual decision making with regards to climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change: Action and Inaction
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Classical Conditioning, Optimisation, Rationalisation
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video lecture
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Dr Robert Gifford
Hosted at The Institute of International and European Affairs
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

 Cognitive Bias and Climate Change

As a teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences, you can use this teaching module to draw a link between psychological bias and climate change. 

Through this module students will learn about the ‘MPG Illusion’ and the influence cognitive biases have in altering human behaviour towards climate change. Through the quiz in this module, students will understand their own biases. Furthermore, students will learn that, as consumers, to make environmentally sustainable choices, they may have to reframe  a problem to avoid biases.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is cognitive bias?
  2. How do cognitive biases affect our perception of climate change?
  3. What is an ‘MPG Illusion’? How does it affect consumer behaviour? 
  4. When changing to a more fuel efficient vehicle, which will you choose and why? Changing from 10 MPG to 20 MPG or changing from 25 MPG to a 50 MPG?

About the Tool

Tool Name The MPG Illusion: How Cognitive Biases Increase Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Social Psychology, Climate Psychology, Cognitive Bias
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of Tool Teaching Module
Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Location  US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Richard Larrick (Duke University)
Hosted at Action Teaching
Link Link
Access Online/Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Behavioural Psychology and Climate Change

As a teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences you can use this video to teach your students aspects of behavioral science, explain the limitations of our brains in perceiving climate change, and discuss potential behavioral science solutions to the climate crisis.

Through this video students will understand the concept of psychological distance and how that impacts individual behavior towards climate change. Students will learn about the limitations of the human mind and how effective personal, visual images can be in choosing sustainable lifestyles. Furthermore, students will learn the stages of behavioral psychology from cognitive perception to emotional relation to behavior change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is behavioral psychology?
  2. How do cognitive and psychological factors like ‘psychological distance’ influence responses to climate change?
  3. What effective measures can be taken to instigate behavioral changes at an individual level when responding to the climate crisis?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Behavioral Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Psychological Bias, Psychological Distance
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video (30 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Sabine Pahl, University of Plymouth
Hosted at PICSCanada
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Human behaviour and climate change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic