As a teacher of undergraduate Economics you can use this set of computer-based tools when teaching The Tragedy of the Commons.

Your current lesson plan can be augmented with the following resources of this toolkit

  1. Video that introduces the concept of Tragedy of the Commons
  2. Reading Climate Change: The Ultimate Tragedy of the Commons?
  3. Laboratory Activity in which the atmosphere of planet Earth can be considered as a “commons” and that it is affected by human activities such as global warming.

Thus, the use of this toolkit allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

About the Toolkit
Discipline Economics
Grade Level Undergraduate
Topic(s) in discipline Tragedy of the Commons
Location
Access Online and Offline
Language(s) English
Climate Topic Energy, Economics, and Climate; Policy, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Contents of Toolkit

1.      Video micro-lecture

A video micro-lecture introducing the concept of the Tragedy of the Commons. Several examples are given including greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere.

From the course ‘Introduction to Sustainability’ by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Coursera

https://www.coursera.org/learn/sustainability/lecture/MtxUU/tragedy-of-the-commons

2.      Reading

Reading titled ‘Climate Change: The Ultimate Tragedy of the Commons?’ by Jouni Paavola describing climate change as a ‘commons’ problem, an overview of current climate governance and methods of polycentric governance strategies for addressing global climate change at various levels and scales.

https://www.lincolninst.edu/sites/default/files/pubfiles/climate-change_0.pdf

PAAVOLA, Jouni (2011): Climate change: the ultimate ‘Tragedy of the Commons’? In Daniel Cole & Elinor Ostrom (eds.), Property in Land and Other Resources. Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute for Land Policy, pp. 417-433.

3.      Classroom/Laboratory Activity

In this laboratory activity, students learn that the atmosphere of planet Earth can be considered as a “commons” and that it is affected by human activities such as global warming. The activity also asks students to consider possible economic drivers as potential solutions for the global warming “tragedy”.

Developed by  Laura Triplett, Gustavus Adolphus College

InTeGrate at Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College
https://serc.carleton.edu/integrate/programs/implementation/program2/activities/135953.html