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As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Democratic Republic of Congo.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Democratic Republic of Congo that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Democratic Republic of Congo due to climate change. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Democratic Republic of Congo?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Democratic Republic of Congo?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Democratic Republic of Congo in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Democratic Republic of Congo?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming, Climate Change Risk Profile of Democratic Republic of Congo, Health Impacts of Climate Change
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Democratic Republic of Congo.

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in the country.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Democratic Republic of Congo' Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Democratic Republic of Congo to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Democratic Republic of Congo from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Democratic Republic of Congo.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Democratic Republic of Congo in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Democratic Republic of Congo.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Democratic Republic of Congo Use a reading by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID to stress to your students how climate change can impact food security in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This factsheet (7 pages) titled Climate Risks in Food For Peace Geographies: Democratic Republic of Congo includes information on how climate change can impact the agricultural sector in the country. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand climate stressors and climate risks in the agricultural sector such  as increased crop losses/failure, increased livestock mortality, more pests, weeds, pathogens, and damage to limited transport networks in South Kivu and parts of Kasai and Tanganyka and other regions in the country.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Uganda.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Uganda that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Uganda due to climate change.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Uganda?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Uganda?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Uganda in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Uganda?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Uganda

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Uganda
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Uganda.

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Uganda.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Uganda ' Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Kenya to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Uganda from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (3 pages) includes current and future climate impacts and vulnerabilities in Uganda in terms of temperature, precipitation and flooding, drought, and winds and storms.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Uganda in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank

This resource can be accessed here.

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Kenya.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Uganda Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Uganda. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Uganda includes information on climate hazard projections for Uganda and current and future health risks of climate change in Uganda. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Uganda with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Kenya.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Kenya that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Kenya due to climate change. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Kenya?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Kenya?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Kenya in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Kenya?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Kenya

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Kenya
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Kenya.

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Kenya.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Kenya' Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Kenya to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Kenya from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Kenya.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Kenya in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Kenya.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Kenya Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Kenya. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Kenya includes information on climate hazard projections for Kenya and current and future health risks of climate change in Kenya. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Kenya with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Germany.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Germany that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, and energy. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Germany due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Germany?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Germany?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Germany in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Germany?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Germany

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Europe, Germany
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

Reading by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and impacts in Germany. This can be accessed here.
Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Germany.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Germany' Use the web resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and climate risks in Germany to your students.

This resource contains information specific to Germany and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Germany.

This resource can be accessed here.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Germany Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Germany. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Germany includes information on climate hazard projections for Germany and current and future health risks of climate change in Germany. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Germany with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Indonesia.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Indonesia that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Indonesia due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Indonesia?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Indonesia?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Indonesia in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Indonesia?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Indonesia

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, Indonesia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Indonesia:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Indonesia.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Indonesia ’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Indonesia to your students.

A) First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Indonesia from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Indonesia.

This resource can be accessed here.

B) You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Indonesia in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Indonesiaand includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Indonesia.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Indonesia Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Indonesia. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Indonesia includes information on climate hazard projections for Indonesia and current and future health risks of climate change in Indonesia. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Indonesia with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Nepal.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Nepal that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Nepal due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Nepal?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Nepal?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Nepal in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Nepal?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Nepal

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, Nepal
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Nepal:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Nepal.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Nepal’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Ethiopia to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Nepal from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Nepal.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Nepal in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Nepal and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Nepal.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Nepal Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Nepal. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Nepal includes information on climate hazard projections for Nepal and current and future health risks of climate change in Nepal. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Nepal with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Nigeria.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Nigeria that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Nigeria due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Nigeria?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Nigeria?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Nigeria in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Nigeria?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming,

Climate Change Risk Profile of Nigeria,

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Nigeria
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Peru:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Nigeria.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Nigeria ’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Ethiopia to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Nigeria from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Nigeria.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Nigeria in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Nigeria and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Nigeria.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Nigeria Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Nigeria. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Nigeria includes information on climate hazard projections for Nigeria and current and future health risks of climate change in Nigeria. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Nigeria with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Pakistan.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Pakistan that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Pakistan due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Pakistan?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Pakistan?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Pakistan in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Pakistan?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Pakistan

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, Pakistan
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Pakistan:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed  here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Pakistan.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Pakistan’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Pakistan to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Peru from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Pakistan.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Peru in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Pakistan and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Pakistan.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Pakistan Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Pakistan. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Pakistan includes information on climate hazard projections for Pakistan and current and future health risks of climate change in Pakistan. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Pakistan with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Philippines.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Philippines that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Philippines due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Philippines?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Philippines?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Philippines in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Philippines?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Philippines

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, Philippines
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Philippines.

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Philippines.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Philippines’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Philippines to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Philippines from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Philippines.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Philippines in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains the information specific to Philippines and includes the following sections:

  1. Overview
  2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
  3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
  4. Vulnerability
  5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
  6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Philippines.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Philippines Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Philippines. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Philippines includes information on climate hazard projections for Philippines and current and future health risks of climate change in Philippines. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Philippines with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition, etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Peru.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Peru that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Peru due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Peru?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Peru?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Peru in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Peru?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Peru

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location South America, Peru
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Peru:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed in English here and in Spanish here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Peru.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Peru’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Peru to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Peru from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Peru.

This resource can be accessed in  English and in Spanish.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Peru in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Peru and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Peru.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Peru Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Peru. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Peru includes information on climate hazard projections for Peru and current and future health risks of climate change in Peru. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Peru with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in France.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for France that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, and energy. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in France due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in France?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact France?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact France in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in France?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of France

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Europe, France
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A reading by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and impacts in France.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in France.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in France' Use the web resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and climate risks in France to your students.

This resource contains information specific to France and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in France.

This resource can be accessed here.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in France  

Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in France. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: France includes information on climate hazard projections for France and current and future health risks of climate change in France. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks climate change pose to human health in France with respect to infectious disease does, heat-related mortality, air pollution etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Ethiopia.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Ethiopia that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Ethiopia due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Ethiopia?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Ethiopia?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Ethiopia in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Ethiopia?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Ethiopia

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Ethiopia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Ethiopia:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Ethiopia.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Ethiopia’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Ethiopia to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Ethiopia from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Ethiopia.

This can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Ethiopia in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Ethiopia and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Ethiopia.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Ethiopia  

Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Ethiopia. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Ethiopia includes information on climate hazard projections for Ethiopia and current and future health risks of climate change in Ethiopia. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Ethiopia with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

 

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Egypt.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Egypt that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Egypt due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Egypt?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Egypt?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Egypt in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Egypt?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Egypt

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Africa, Egypt
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Egypt:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Egypt.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Egypt’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Egyptto your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Egypt from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Egypt.

This can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Egypt in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Egypt and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Egypt.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Egypt Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Egypt. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Egypt includes information on climate hazard projections for Egypt and current and future health risks of climate change in Egypt. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Egypt with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This can be accessed here.

 

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Colombia.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Colombia that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Colombia due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Colombia?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Colombia?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Colombia in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Colombia?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Colombia

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location South America, Colombia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Colombia:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Colombia.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Colombia ’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Colombiato your students.

A.  First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Colombia from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (7 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Colombia.

This can be accessed here.

B.   You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Colombia in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Colombia and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Colombia.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Colombia Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Colombia. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Colombia includes information on climate hazard projections for Colombia and current and future health risks of climate change in Colombia. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Colombia with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in United Kingdom.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for United Kingdom that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, and energy. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in United Kingdom due to climate change.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in United Kingdom?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact United Kingdom?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact United Kingdom in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in United Kingdom?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of United Kingdom

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Europe, United Kingdom
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A reading by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and impacts in United Kingdom.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in United Kingdom.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in United Kingdom' Use the web resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and climate risks in United Kingdom to your students.

This resource can be accessed here.

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in United Kingdom.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in United Kingdom Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in United Kingdom. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: United Kingdom includes information on climate hazard projections for United Kingdom and current and future health risks of climate change in United Kingdom. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in United Kingdom with respect to infectious disease, heat related mortality, air pollution etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in China.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for China that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, and energy. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in China due to climate change.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in China?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact China?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in temperature, precipitation, storms, droughts impact China in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in China?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming,

Climate Change Risk Profile of China,

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, China
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Reading

(30 min)

A reading by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and impacts in China.
Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in China

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This resource can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:

1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1

2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2

3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3

4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4

5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5

6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6

7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Reading: Climate Change in China Use the web resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and climate risks in China to your students.

This resource contains information specific to China and includes the following sections:

1. Overview

2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections

3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health

4. Vulnerability

5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise

6. Adaptation

 

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in China.

This resource can be accessed here.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in China Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in China. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: China includes information on climate hazard projections for China and current and future health risks of climate change in China. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in China with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Brazil.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Brazil that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Brazil due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Brazil?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Brazil?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Brazil in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Brazil?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming,

Climate Change Risk Profile of Brazil,

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location South America, Brazil
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Brazil:

Reading 1 by Climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Brazil

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

 Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:

1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1

2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2

3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3

4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4

5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5

6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6

7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings: Climate Change in Brazil Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Brazil to your students.

A.      First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Brazil from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (7 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Brazil.This resource can be accessed here.

B.      You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Brazil in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Brazil and includes the following sections:

1. Overview

2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections

3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health

4. Vulnerability

5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise

6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Brazil.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Brazil Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Brazil. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Brazil includes information on climate hazard projections for Brazil and current and future health risks of climate change in Brazil. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Brazil with respect to infectious disease, malaria, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Bangladesh.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Bangladesh that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Bangladesh due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Bangladesh?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Bangladesh?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Bangladesh in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Bangladesh?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Bangladesh

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Asia, Bangladesh
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Bangladesh:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Bangladesh.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Bangladesh’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Bangladesh to your students.

A.      First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Bangladesh from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (7 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Bangladesh.

This can be accessed here.

B.      You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Bangladesh in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Bangladesh and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Bangladesh.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Bangladesh Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Bangladesh. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Bangladesh includes information on climate hazard projections for Bangladesh and current and future health risks of climate change in Bangladesh. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in Bangladesh with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Italy.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Italy that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, and energy. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Italy due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Italy?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Italy?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Italy in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Italy?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Italy

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location Europe, Italy
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(30 min)

A reading by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and impacts in Italy.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Italy.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Italy’ Use the web resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank to explain climate change and climate risks in Italy to your students.

This resource contains the information specific to Italy and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Italy.

This resource can be accessed here.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Italy Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Italy. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Italy includes information on climate hazard projections for Italy and current and future health risks of climate change in Italy. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Italy with respect to infectious disease, heat related mortality, air pollution etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in Mexico.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for Mexico that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in Mexico due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in Mexico?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact Mexico?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact Mexico in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change in Mexico?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of Mexico

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate Variability Record,

Climate and Health, Climate and Agriculture,

Climate Change and Food Security

Location North America, Mexico
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min) A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes, and impacts of climate change. This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7  short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings to explain climate change and impacts in Peru:

Reading 1 by climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This can be accessed here.

Reading 2 by the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank. This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in Mexico.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Introduction to Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:
1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

Readings ‘Climate Change in Mexico’ Use the following readings to explain climate change and climate risks in Ethiopia to your students.

A. First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Peru from climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners USAID. This factsheet (5 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Mexico.

This resource can be accessed here.

B. You may wish to have your students explore climate change and its risks in Mexico in more detail through a resource from the Climate Change Knowledge Portal of the World Bank.

This resource can be accessed here.

This resource contains information specific to Peru and includes the following sections:

1. Overview
2. Climate Data -Historical and Future Projections
3. Climate by Sector – Agriculture, Energy, Water, Health
4. Vulnerability
5. Climate Impacts – Agriculture, Water, Sea Level Rise
6. Adaptation

Each section contains relevant climate change information including data, projections, and visualizations. The data is visualized through interactive graphs and users can select different indices, model projections, timescales, and sectors to better understand the impacts of climate change in Mexico.

Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in Mexico Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in Mexico. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: Mexico includes information on climate hazard projections for Mexico and current and future health risks of climate change in Mexico. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change poses to human health in Mexico with respect to infectious disease, undernutrition etc.

This resource can be accessed here.

As an Undergraduate Biological Sciences or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about zoonosis, the increased risk of inter-species virus spillover due to climate change, infectious diseases such as COVID-19 and their modes of transmission.

In this lesson plan, students will be taught how the occurrence of newly emerging infectious diseases like COVID-19 with zoonotic (vertebrate animal to human) transmission are rising due to the closer interactions of humans and wild animals that result in an increased exposure to animal viruses. Greater human-animal conflicts are largely due to environmental changes such as habitat degradation and biodiversity loss caused by anthropogenic activities.

Through this lesson plan your students will learn that human activities induced climate change in turn causes biodiversity disturbances and could be responsible for the increased risk of animal virus spillover into human populations. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences and Environmental Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the zoonotic transmission of a disease? Give examples.
  2. Why is there an increased incidence of newly emerging viruses in recent times?
  3. How could climate change increase the risk of inter-species virus spillover in the future?
  4. How has climate change affected the occurrence of vector-borne and infectious diseases?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Infectious Diseases, Disease Transmission,

Zoonosis, Virus Spillover, Biodiversity Disturbance,

Animal-Borne Diseases

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere,

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
120 min

Contents

Reading

(20 min)

A reading to introduce the role of climate in the occurrence of infectious diseases.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(20 min)

A reading to explain how climate change related species range shifts and biodiversity disturbances could raise the risk of pandemics.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(20 min)

A research article that describes how changing habitats for mammalian populations can increase the risk of inter-species virus spillover.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(50 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to extend understanding of range shifts due to climate variables, for a species of choice.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduce the role of climate in the occurrence of infectious diseases.

 

Use the reading, ‘Climate Change and Infectious Diseases’ by the World Health Organization, to explain the association of infectious diseases with climatic conditions. Use the text to describe the various modes of transmission of viral diseases in humans, in animals, and between animals and humans. Explain what zoonotic transmission is, in the context of the SARS-CoV-2. Refer to table 6.1 in the text to discuss examples of how environmental changes have affected the occurrence of various infectious diseases in humans in the past. Finally, use the text to emphasize how different methods of predictive modelling have shown that climate change could result in changes in infectious disease transmission patterns.

 

2 Discuss how climate change related species range shifts and biodiversity disturbances could raise the risk of pandemics.

 

Use the reading, ‘Q & A: Could climate change and biodiversity loss raise the risk of pandemics?’ by Daisy Dunne for Carbon Brief, to explain to your students how climate change induced biodiversity disturbances could influence the risk of diseases being transmitted from animals to humans. Use the reading to describe how and why a pandemic could develop when climate change affects the biogeographical distribution of species. Explain how rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns have resulted in some species seeking newer areas. Emphasize on how such movements could increase the contact between animals and humans, and the viruses harbored by them. Highlight how these interactions are exacerbated by human land-use changes such as deforestation and habitat degradation leading to habitat loss. Finally, discuss how all these factors can be responsible for the increased risk of animal-borne diseases crossing over into humans.

 

3 Describe how changing habitats for mammalian populations can increase the risk of inter-species virus spillover. Use the research article, ‘Global shifts in mammalian population trends reveal key predictors of virus spillover risk’ by Christine K. Johnson et al., to explain why zoonotic viruses transmission risk has risen with some animals having shifted their ranges and adapted to more human-dominated landscapes. Discuss the anthropogenic activities that have resulted in greater animal-human interactions and facilitated zoonotic disease transmission.

 

4 Extend understanding of range shifts due to climate variables, for a species of choice.

 

Use this classroom/laboratory activity, ‘Species Range Over Space and Time’ by Debra Linton, Anna Monfils, Libby Ellwood, Molly Phillips on Qubes, to enable students to analyze data for a chosen species from natural history collections for its range shift due to rising temperatures. Follow the instructions given to complete the activity. This tool will enable students to understand the effect of global temperatures on species’ distributions by analyzing a large dataset. Use the questions given in the accompanying activity sheet to initiate discussions about the impact of species range shifts on changing biotic interactions and their influence on human well-being. Discuss students’ findings in the context of the raised risk of climate-induced virus spillover and the possibility of pandemics.

 

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WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard

World Health Organization Coronavirus disease situation dashboard presents official daily counts of COVID-19 cases and deaths worldwide, while providing a hub to other resources. Interactive tools, including maps, epidemic curves and other charts and graphics, with downloadable data, allow users to track and explore the latest trends, numbers and statistics at global, regional and country levels.

As an Undergraduate Social Sciences or Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about demography, population trends, urbanization, and the role of demographics in the spread of infectious diseases such as COVID-19 and the increased risk of pandemics due to climate change.

In this lesson plan, students will be taught about population patterns, urbanization, and the relation of demography and the environment. This lesson plan will allow you to teach your students how demographic changes due to factors such as climate change, can make human populations more vulnerable to pandemics like COVID-19.

Through an interactive online activity, this lesson plan will enable students to apply understanding of demographics such as population density and mortality rates on the risk of transmission of an infectious disease like COVID-19 and on the efficacy of vaccination programs against it. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Social Sciences and Biological Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is demography and what are the demographic measurements for a population?
  2. What is urbanization and how does it affect human ecology?
  3. What is the relation of demography with the environment?
  4. How does the study of demography help explain the rate of transmission and mortality rates of an infectious disease such as COVID-19?
  5. How do demographic changes due to climate change increase the risk of pandemics?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences, Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Demography, Population Trends and Patterns

Population Density, Urbanization

Fertility and Mortality Rates, Human Ecology

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online,
Approximate
Time Required
70-90 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to introduce demography, population trends, urbanization, and the influence of the environment and climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(10 min)

A reading to explain how demographic changes can affect the vulnerability of populations to pandemics like COVID-19.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(10 min)

A report that describes how demographic science helps explain the spread and fatality rates of COVID-19.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(75-90+ min)

An interactive simulation to extend student understanding of the role of demographics in the rate of transmission of various diseases and on the efficacy of vaccines against them.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

1 Introduce the topics of demography, population trends, and urbanization. Use the teaching module, ‘Introduction to Population, Urbanization, and the Environment’ by OpenStaxTM to teach your students about demography, population trends and patterns, fertility and mortality rates, demographic theories, and urbanization. Describe the changing demographics of a population from various sociological perspectives such as climate-induced human migrations. Finally, explain how urbanization has led to environmental concerns that are exacerbated due to climate change.

This can be accessed here.

2 Explain how demography determines the vulnerability of populations to pandemics. Use the article, ‘How Demographic Changes Make Us More Vulnerable to Pandemics Like the Coronavirus’ by Toshiko Kaneda and Charlotte Greenbaum for Population Research Bureau (PRB) to describe how current population trends enable viral transmission and raise the possibility of a pandemic such as COVID-19. Discuss how population mobility has enabled viral transmission across the world and population density has determined the rate of transmission of the disease. Explain how urbanization has greatly influenced the viral transmission of COVID-19. Further, discuss the vulnerability of a population due to age related pattern of mortality. Finally, emphasize how these demographic changes make populations vulnerable to pandemics.

This can be accessed here.

3 Discuss the demographic patterns of transmission of COVID-19. Use the report, ‘Demographic science aids in understanding the spread and fatality rates of COVID-19’ by Jennifer B. Dowd et al. in PNAS to explain the demographic trends of COVID-19 transmission in a population. Emphasize on the relevance of demographic science in elucidating the population patterns observed in the rates of disease transmission and the associated mortality rates.

This can be accessed here.

4 Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity to extend understanding about demographic parameters in the rate of transmission of an infectious disease. Use the interactive lab activity, ‘Disease Lab’ by Annenberg Learner, to enable students to understand the rate of transmission of various hypothetical diseases under changing demographic parameters. This activity can be conducted in conjunction with another lab activity- ‘Demographics Lab’ to better understand the demographic parameters under consideration. Direct the students to follow the instructions given in the activity sheets to analyze the results of the simulations and formulate answers to the given questions. Extend the activity to analyze the scenarios of disease progression with or without vaccination programs. Use the current population and mortality data rates in your region to run the simulations in the context of COVID-19 and summarize the findings.

This can be accessed here.

WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard

World Health Organization Coronavirus disease situation dashboard presents official daily counts of COVID-19 cases and deaths worldwide, while providing a hub to other resources. Interactive tools, including maps, epidemic curves and other charts and graphics, with downloadable data, allow users to track and explore the latest trends, numbers and statistics at global, regional and country levels.

As an Undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Through this lesson plan your students will be introduced to one of the most significant issues of our times- Climate Change- and will be able to learn how economic policies can be designed for a ‘green recovery’ from the coronavirus pandemic. In this lesson plan, students will be able to learn through a classroom activity, the role of carbon pricing in the reduction of carbon emissions and its significance for climate mitigation. Further, this activity will enable students to discuss how carbon pricing vis a vis carbon taxes, could help governments’ ‘green recovery’ economic strategies to rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic related economic slowdown. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in economic terms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the coronavirus pandemic?
  3. How does carbon pricing help to reduce carbon emissions? What is its significance in the economic recovery plans from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  4. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Economics, Green Recovery

Carbon Emissions, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Taxes

Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance

Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
120-150 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading to introduce the COVID-19 narrative alongside climate change, in defining future economic policies.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(25 min)

An interactive webpage to track the world’s COVID-19 related ‘green recovery’ plans aimed at reducing carbon emissions while boosting economies.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(10 min)

A policy brief about the importance of pricing carbon for a ‘green recovery’ from the coronavirus pandemic.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(75-90+ min)

A classroom activity to enable discussion on economic policy options such as carbon pricing, carbon taxes, and emissions trading for reducing carbon emissions in the context of ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduce the COVID-19 narrative alongside climate change, in defining future economic policies Use the reading, ‘The coming battle for the COVID-19 narrative’ by Samuel Bowles, Research Professor and Director of the Behavioral Sciences Program, Santa Fe Institute and Wendy Carlin, Professor of Economics, UCL for VOX, CEPR Policy Portal, to explain how the COVID-19 pandemic will be an important consideration alongside climate change, in the future narrative of economics and public policy.

This can be accessed here.

2 Introduce the economic strategies planned by governments world-wide to enable a ‘green recovery’ from the coronavirus pandemic

 

Use the webpage, ‘Coronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions’ by Carbon Brief to explain the different strategies planned by various governments for their nations’ economic recovery. Use the in-built interactive grid to discuss the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions- referred as ‘green’ measures- for several major economies such as United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Highlight the sector-wise application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs to enable a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

This can be accessed here.

3 Discuss the importance of pricing carbon for a ‘green recovery’ from the coronavirus pandemic

 

Use the policy brief, ‘Pricing carbon during the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic’ by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, to discuss their recommendations for governments globally including zero-carbon investments, removal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and using carbon pricing revenues for economic recovery. Emphasize on carbon pricing as an effective strategy to reduce carbon emissions worldwide (refer to the additional resources section).

This can be accessed here.

4 Conduct a classroom activity to enable discussion on economic policy options for reducing carbon emissions Use the classroom activity, ‘Carbon Emissions Game’ by Gautam Sethi, Bard College for SERC, to enable discussion on economic policy options such as carbon pricing, carbon taxes, and emissions trading for reducing carbon emissions. Follow the instructions for the activity and conduct discussions on the effective use of economic tools such as carbon pricing in reducing carbon emissions for the global economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

This can be accessed here.

As an Undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about opportunity costs using an in-class experiment of trading emissions permits for the use of a hypothetical fuel that emits greenhouse gases.

Global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of fuel, is an important aspect of climate change. This lesson plan will enable your students to apply their understanding of opportunity costs for the use of a greenhouse gas emitting fuel in product manufacturing. This resource will allow your students to experiment with individual/consumer choices and budget constraints for production decisions by trading emissions permits at a fixed market price in an interactive classroom experiment. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the opportunity cost in economics? Give an example.
  2. How is opportunity cost calculated?
  3. What are tradable pollution/emissions permits and how do they work?
  4. What are the economic policy measures used to address the opportunity cost of carbon emissions?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Opportunity Sets, Opportunity Costs, Individual Choices, Consumer Choices, Budget Constraints, Fixed Market price, Becker-DeGroot-Marshak (BDM), Market Failures and Externalities, Tradable Pollution/ Emission Permits, Emission Permit Allocation,
Cap and Trade Schemes
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
45-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(15 min)

A teaching module to introduce individual/consumer choices, budget constraints, and opportunity costs.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(30 – 45 min)

An in-class interactive activity to teach opportunity costs of product manufacturing through the trading of hypothetical emissions permits.

This can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Topic introduction and discussion Use the teaching module, ‘2.1 How Individuals Make Choices Based on Their Budget Constraint’ by OpenStaxTM, Rice University, to introduce the topic of opportunity costs in economics. Use the tool to explain individual/consumer choices based on budget constraints and how this gets factored into opportunity costs.

Use the exercises given in the text to illustrate these economic concepts. You may also choose to use another teaching module by CORE Project (link is given in additional resources section) to enable a better understanding of opportunity costs using several other examples and exercises given in the text.

This can be accessed here.

2 Apply understanding Use the academic paper, ‘Teaching Opportunity Cost in an Emissions Permit Experiment’ by Charles Holt et al., International Review of Economics Education, provided by The Economics Network, UK, to conduct an in-class individual choice experiment to teach your students to identify and account for opportunity costs in production decisions. The students play the role of producers and must make production quantity decisions based on the costs of fuel input and the associated emissions permits.

Explain what these tradable pollution/emissions permits are and how they affect the opportunity costs of production. Follow the instructions given in the paper to conduct the classroom activity. This activity is designed to be paper-based or conducted online using the Veconlab software (details given in text). Use the suggested extensions and discussion points given in the paper to initiate classroom discussions about the use of tradable emissions permits, the cap and trade schemes, and the permit allocation systems.

Finally, discuss how these decisions based on opportunity costs in production are relevant in the context of human-induced climate change.

This can be accessed here.

As a High School or Undergraduate teacher in Environmental Sciences, Social Sciences, or Agricultural Sciences, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about the desert locust outbreaks of 2019-2020, how it may be causing food insecurity in some countries, and the link between the current locust outbreak with unusual weather and climate conditions.

Massive locust swarms, sometimes as large as the size of cities, have caused widespread damage to crops in parts of East Africa, South Asia, and the Arabian peninsula since October 2019 leading to a potential food crisis in some nations. The situation is further exacerbated as relief measures are hampered due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It is thought that unusually wet and warmer weather conditions driven by climate change caused favorable breeding conditions for the locusts. According to the UN secretary general, António Guterres, “There is a link between climate change and the unprecedented locust crisis plaguing Ethiopia and East Africa. Warmer seas mean more cyclones generating the perfect breeding ground for locusts.”
This lesson plan provides teaching resources to introduce the desert locust plague of 2019-20 and how it is causing a potential food crisis in some countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Yemen. It focuses on how unusual weather conditions caused by the Indian Ocean Dipole could have led to favorable conditions for the locust breeding and that future locust outbreaks could become more common in a warmer world.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a topic in Environmental Sciences, Social Sciences, or Agricultural Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is desert locust? How big are locust swarms?
  2. What countries are affected by the locust plague of 2019-20?
  3. How is the locust plague causing food insecurity in some countries?
  4. What weather conditions are favorable for locust breeding?
  5. How has climate change affected weather patterns in East Africa?
  6. Is climate change responsible for the current locust outbreak?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Environmental Sciences, Social Sciences, Agricultural Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Locust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security

Agriculture, Climate Change and Food Security

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Africa, Asia, Kenya, Ethiopia,

Somalia, Yemen, India, Pakistan

Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading on desert locusts and locust plagues from the Desert Locust Information Service of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading on food security and the countries that experienced potential food shortages due to the locust swarms of the World Resources Institute (WRI). This reading is titled ‘Which Countries Are Most Vulnerable to Locust Swarms?’ by Tina Huang.

This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

Two readings on how the current locust plague is potentially linked to climate change.

 

Reading 1: ‘A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame’ by Madeleine Stone for the National Geographic

Reading 2: ‘Are the 2019-20 locust swarms linked to climate change?’ by Daisy Dunne at CarbonBrief

Video

(4 min)

Optional: A video on the Indian Ocean Dipole which affects the weather patterns in East Africa to West Australia by Prof Tracey Rogers, UNSW, Sydney.

This can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduce the topic of Desert Locusts Introduce your students to desert locusts and locust plagues using a reading from the Desert Locust Information Service of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

This resource can be accessed here.

Use the Frequently Asked Questions section and direct your students to read the following short sections.

1.     What is a Desert Locust?

2.     What countries are affected by the Desert Locust?

3.     Do Desert Locust plagues occur with any regularity?

4.     How long does a Desert Locust live?

5.     How many eggs does a Desert Locust female produce?

6.     How far and how fast can Desert Locusts migrate?

7.     How big are swarms and how many locusts are there in a swarm?

8.     What percentage of the Desert Locust's exoskeleton is chitin?

9.     How much food can a Desert Locust eat?

10.  What is the relationship between locusts and ecology?

11.  Why do locusts change their behaviour?

2 The Locust Outbreak and Food Insecurity Introduce the topic of food security and the countries that experienced potential food shortages due to the locust swarms through an interactive reading of the World Resources Institute (WRI) titled ‘Which Countries Are Most Vulnerable to Locust Swarms?’ by Tina Huang.

This resource can be accessed here.

 Discuss with your students which countries are hotspots of locust activity in the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and South Asia and how the locust swarms are causing potential food insecurity there. The resource includes datasets and visualizations of vulnerable countries from the World Food Programme, real-time data on locust outbreaks, Famine Early Warning Systems Network, WRI’s Resource Watch platform, amongst others.

3 Climate Change and the Locust Plague Next discuss with your students how the current locust plague is potentially linked to climate change through two readings.

Reading 1: ‘A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame’ by Madeleine Stone for the National Geographic

and

Reading 2: ‘Are the 2019-20 locust swarms linked to climate change?’ by Daisy Dunne at CarbonBrief

Explain to your students how there was an unusually wet weather in East Africa over the last year or so. This included several cyclones which are rare in the region.

This wet weather and storminess is thought to have caused favorable conditions for the locust breeding. Further explain to the students how the wet weather and storminess is related to the Indian Ocean Dipole system. It has been hypothesized that climate change may be affecting the Indian Ocean Dipole.

Further discuss with your students how future locust outbreaks could become more common in a warmer world.

4 Optional: The Indian Ocean Dipole Optional: You may choose to emphasize the Indian Ocean Dipole, a climate system that impacts the weather from East Africa to West Australia using this short video by Prof Tracey Rogers, UNSW, Sydney.

This resource can be accessed here.

As a High School or introductory Undergraduate Environmental Sciences or Chemistry or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about Earth’s carbon cycle, its role in Earth’s climate, its irregularities due to anthropogenic activities, and its regulation by carbon sequestration.

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the various components and processes involved in Earth’s carbon cycle and its influence on Earth’s climate. This lesson plan will enable students to learn through interactive exercises how disturbances in the carbon cycle due to human activities have contributed towards global warming and climate change. Through this lesson plan your students will also learn about processes of carbon sequestration to regulate the disturbed carbon cycle and its role in climate mitigation and adaptation. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences or Chemistry or Earth Sciences.

Lesson plan developed with contribution from Gargi Khandelwal, St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the carbon cycle? Describe its components and processes.
  2. How does the carbon cycle influence Earth’s climate?
  3. Why has the carbon cycle changed in recent times?
  4. What is carbon sequestration and how does it regulate the carbon cycle?
  5. Explain the importance of carbon sequestration in climate mitigation.

Carbon Sequestration

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Environmental Sciences, Chemistry,

Earth Sciences

Topic(s) in Discipline Carbon Cycle, Carbon Sequestration,

Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere, Climate and the Biosphere

Climate and the Hydrosphere, Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-90 min

Contents

Teaching Module (15-45 min) A teaching module to describe the components and explain the processes involved in the natural carbon cycle and its role in Earth’s climate.

This can be accessed here.

Infographic (5 min) An infographic to describe how the Earth’s carbon cycle is changing due to anthropogenic activities.

The infographic can be accessed here.

Quiz (~10 min) An interactive online quiz to test student understanding of the carbon cycle and its influence on Earth’s climate.

This can be accessed here.

Reading (30 min) A reading to describe natural carbon sources and sinks and the role of carbon sequestration by carbon capture and storage for climate mitigation.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduce the carbon cycle and explain its role in Earth’s climate Use the teaching module, ‘The Carbon Cycle’ by University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) to describe what the carbon cycle is and how carbon is cycled through different parts of the Earth- atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

You may choose to use the ‘related pages and diagrams’ section to teach about the components and geochemical processes involved in the natural carbon cycle. Use the subsection ‘The Changing Carbon Cycle’ to explain how human activities are affecting the natural carbon cycle.

Finally, use the hands-on interactive activities in the ‘related resources’ section to elaborate on the role of the carbon cycle in Earth’s climate.

This can be accessed here.

2 Extend understanding of the changing carbon cycle Use the infographic, ‘Earth’s carbon cycle is off balance’ by NASA to explain how higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities are affecting the natural carbon cycle.

The infographic can be accessed here.

3 Enable discussion about how an off-balance carbon cycle contributes to climate change Use the interactive online quiz, ‘Carbon and the climate’ by NASA to test student understanding of the various components of the carbon cycle.

Encourage a discussion on their influence on Earth’s climate and how changes in them may contribute to climate change.

This can be accessed here.

4 Introduce carbon sequestration and describe its importance in climate mitigation Use the reading, ‘Carbon Sequestration’ by Noelle Eckley Selin, Associate Professor of Engineering Systems and Atmospheric Chemistry, MIT, to describe natural carbon sources and sinks. Explain how their balance is affected by anthropogenic activities with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide being added to the atmosphere.

Use the text to emphasize on the importance of the removal of this excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using technologies for carbon capture and storage, and carbon sequestration. Use the various embedded links to elaborate on these geoengineering processes. Finally, initiate a discussion on the significance of carbon sequestration in regulating the carbon cycle and thereby, enabling climate mitigation.

This can be accessed here.

As an Undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about implementation of environmental policies by measuring the value of abatement.

This lesson plan will enable you to teach your students about assessing the benefits of abatement by analyzing a survey to measure the willingness of people to pay for climate change mitigation. Economists often face the problem of placing a value on the abatement of environmental damage, to set against the cost of implementing abatement policies. Amongst the various methods used to estimate the value of abatement are contingent valuation and hedonic pricing. In this lesson plan, students will be able to learn about the challenges of placing a value on abatement through a classroom exercise in contingent valuation of the willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce carbon emissions to mitigate climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Value of Abatement, Contingent Valuation,

Hedonic Pricing, Willingness to Pay (WTP),

Cronbach’s Alpha

Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance

Location Global, Germany
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
90-120 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30-45 min)

A teaching module to explain the measurement challenges of environmental policy, specifically the value of abatement.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(60-75 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to measure the willingness to pay for climate change mitigation.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(20 min)

A research article that discusses the scope for cooperation in the climate commons.

This can be accessed here.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the value of abatement in environmental policies?
  2. Why is it important to measure the value of abatement?
  3. How is the value of abatement measured?
  4. Why is estimating the value of abatement important for climate change mitigation?

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduce the topic of value of abatement in environmental policies. 1.       Use the teaching module, ‘20.6: The measurement challenges of environmental policy’ by CORE to explain the need to measure the value of abatement in the implementation of environmental policy.

2.     This can be accessed here.

3.       Describe the different methods to measure the benefits of abatement- contingent valuation and hedonic pricing using the examples given in text. Explain the differences in these approaches and how these are used to measure how people value a change in their environment. Discuss how this is measured by the citizens’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the improved environment following the implementation of abatement policies. Enable student learning and evaluate understanding through the in-built exercises and questions.

4.       You may choose to navigate to the following sections (20.7-20.10) to explain how future technologies and lifestyles could affect people’s preferences, discuss why addressing climate change is so difficult, and why policy choices matter in implementing environmental policies.

2 Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity to measure the willingness to pay for climate change mitigation 1.       Use the project, ‘Measuring willingness to pay for climate change mitigation’ by CORE to conduct a classroom activity using data from an internet survey by the German government.

This project can be accessed here.

2.       The online survey was conducted to measure the citizens’ willingness to pay to reduce carbon emissions as a method of mitigating climate change. The data is made available in Excel, R, and Google Sheets formats.

3.       Direct your students to follow the instructions given in the text to analyze the data to answer the given set of questions.

4.       The activity will enable them to ‘construct indices to measure attitudes or opinions’, ‘use Cronbach’s alpha to assess indices for internal consistency’, ‘practice recoding and creating new variables’, and ‘compare survey measures of willingness to pay’.

3 Reading assignment to enable discussion on the willingness of individuals to contribute towards the common good in the face of climate change. 1.       Ask your students to read the research article, ‘Cooperation in the climate commons’ by Stefano Carattini et al., published by the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

This can be accessed here.

2.       Use the paper to initiate discussion on the willingness of individuals to reduce the demands on the environmental commons by adopting ‘green’ consumer behavior or by accepting expensive climate policies.

3.       Finally, use the review of cases and situations given in the text to discuss whether individuals are willing to cooperate towards climate change mitigation.

As an Undergraduate teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences you can use this lesson plan to teach your students impacts of climate change on mental health and well-being.

This lesson plan provides an overview of several mental health consequences of global warming. These include stress and distress symptoms and clinical disorders like anxiety, depression, and even suicidality amongst others. It addresses how climate change and its impacts can affect the perceptions of everyday experiences and life of individuals and communities. And further highlights how mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming often are linked with other social and environmental stresses. These effects are direct and indirect, are complex, multi-level and can be acute or gradual. This lesson plan further emphasizes how the mental health and well-being consequences of climate change are a crucial in understanding how climate change impacts human health overall.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach aspects of Psychology in your Social Sciences classroom. This lesson plan can be used as a module in a Psychological Disorders or Mental Health courses or as a topic in Psychological Disorders or Therapy or Stress, Lifestyle, and Health sections in an Introductory Psychology course.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are the mental health consequences of climate change?
  2. Discuss the multi-layered and interconnectedness of physical impacts, human systems and infrastructure impacts, and human health impacts of climate change.
  3. What are the connections between the mental, physical and community health aspects of human health and well-being?
  4. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming such as due to extreme weather events and natural disasters?
  5. What are some psychosocial mediators of climate change impacts?
  6. How do people adapt to and cope with the perceived threat of climate change?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline  Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Psychological Disorders, Mental Health, Stress

Anxiety, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Suicide, Depression, Well-being

Climate Change and Mental Health, Climate and Society

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
90 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

Reading to introduce Psychosocial and Mental Health Impacts of Climate Change from the Report of the American Psychological Association Task Force on the Interface Between Psychology and Global Climate Change. This report is titled ‘Psychology & Global Climate Change: Addressing a multifaceted phenomenon and set of challenges’.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(15 min)

A reading on food security and the countries that experienced potential food shortages due to the locust swarms of the World Resources Institute (WRI). This reading is titled ‘Which Countries Are Most Vulnerable to Locust Swarms?’ by Tina Huang.

This can be accessed here.

Video

(25 min)

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change,’ by Prof Susan Clayton.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom Exercise

(30 min)

Classroom exercise from a teaching module titled ‘Climate Change: A Human Health Perspective. A Student Exploration of the Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States’ by Dana Brown Haine and Stefani Dawn and hosted at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduction to Climate Change and Mental Health and Well-Being Introduce your students to the lesson plan by providing an overview of the Psychosocial and Mental Health Impacts of Climate Change. You may proceed with your own lecture material or can provide your students with a reading from the Report of the American Psychological Association Task Force on the Interface Between Psychology and Global Climate Change. This report is titled ‘Psychology & Global Climate Change: Addressing a multifaceted phenomenon and set of challenges’.

This resource can be accessed here.

Instruct your students to read Section 3: What Are the Psychosocial Impacts of Climate Change? Pages 42-49 and Section 4: How Do People Adapt to and Cope With the Perceived Threat and Unfolding Impacts of Climate Change? Pages 52-61.

You can use this resource to provide an overview to your students on the psychosocial and mental health impacts of climate change and its impacts. Discuss the issue with your students and emphasize the following main points from the readings.

1.       Psychosocial and Mental Health Impacts of Climate Change

2.       Social and Community impacts of climate change

3.       Psychosocial Mediators of Climate Change Impacts

4.       Global Climate Change in Context of Other Environmental Challenges

5.       Psychological Benefits Associated With Responding to Climate Change

6.       Relationship Between Psychosocial Impacts and Coping

7.       How Do People Adapt to and Cope With the Perceived Threat of Climate Change?

8.       Climate Change Threat and Environmental Impacts as Stressors

9.       Mediating Relations Between Stressors and Coping Responses

10.   Types of Coping Responses

11.   Interventions

2 Extend understanding Next, further your students understanding of the topic through a video lecture. This video lecture is titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change,’ by Prof Susan Clayton.

This resource can be accessed here.

In this video Prof Clayton discusses why it is important to discuss the health impacts of climate change, particularly the mental health and well-being aspects. Have your students watch this video lecture and conduct a classroom discussion. Emphasize the main points of the lecture in your discussion including the complexities of climate change and health impacts and how climate change can have direct or indirect effects on mental health and well- being and that these can be acute or gradual. Discuss the multi-layered and interconnectedness of physical impacts, human systems and infrastructure impacts, and human health impacts of climate change. Further stress on the connections between the mental, physical and community health of human health impacts of climate change. Note all the psychosocial and mental health consequences of global warming such as anxiety, stress, post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd), grief, chronic psychological dysfunction, and depression. Also draw your students’ attention to how people are responsive to messages around health and so it can be an effective way to addressing the climate crisis.

3 Classroom Activity Next, conduct a classroom activity and discussion using a teaching module. This teaching module titled ‘Climate Change: A Human Health Perspective. A Student Exploration of the Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States’ has been developed by Dana Brown Haine and Stefani Dawn and is hosted at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

This teaching module serves as an excellent resource for your students to learn about the impacts of climate change on human health. The topics in the module are Temperature-related Death and Illness; Air Quality Impacts; Extreme Events; Vector-Borne Diseases; Water-Related Illness; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Distribution; and Mental Health and Well-Being.

This resource can be accessed here.

Direct your students to Chapter 8: Mental Health and Well-Being. Have your students read the chapter and do the suggested exercises. Discuss with your students the pathways of Climate Drivers such as altered weather patterns, temperature changes; Exposure Pathways; Mental Health Outcomes such as anxiety, emotional stress, acute traumatic stress, post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd), grief, chronic psychological dysfunction, depression, poor concentration, sleep disorders amongst others; and Vulnerable Populations like children, the elderly, women (especially pregnant and postpartum women), people with

pre-existing mental illness, economically disadvantaged and homeless and others.

As a High School or Undergraduate teacher in the Humanities, the Social Sciences, Earth Sciences, or Environmental Sciences, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming through Hip-Hop.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to Hip-Hop education and the importance of the use of popular and contemporary resources such as rap music to engage with the youth in the classroom. It focuses on the album ‘The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos’ by rapper and science communicator Baba Brinkman. This lesson plan provides a template on the use of contemporary and popular rap music on the science and politics of climate change so that your students can better engage with the climate crisis.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Humanities, Social Sciences, Earth Sciences, or Environmental Sciences classrooms. Teachers in the Humanities and the Social Sciences can use this lesson plan to teach topics such as Race Studies, Cultural Studies, Social Theory as per their syllabi while teachers in the Earth Sciences and Environmental Sciences can use the lesson plan to teach Climate Change to their students using a novel pedagogical approach.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the impacts of climate change?
  3. What is the role of fossil fuel burning in the warming of the planet?
  4. How do the current energy policies contribute to an increase in the greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere?
  5. Discuss global warming and the politics underlying the problem.
  6. Is individual agency enough to combat climate change?
  7. What political reforms can incorporate individual responses to climate change in conjunction with large scale reforms?
  8. What is Green Capitalism? What is Cap and Trade? How would you compare it with climate taxes?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences, Earth Sciences,

Environmental Sciences

Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming,

Hip-Hop, Hip-Hop Education, Rap

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change

Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance

Energy, Economics, and Climate Change

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60-100 min

Contents

Reading

(15 min) and Video lecture (20 min)

A reading titled ‘The World IS Yours: A Brief History of Hip-Hop Education’ by Martha Diaz, Education Chair- Universal Hip-Hop Museum and Founder – Hip-Hop Education Center as an introduction to Hip-Hop education.

This can be accessed here. (Requires sign up for free access)

 

A video lecture of a panel discussion hosted by the Columbia University School of Professional Studies Community Scholars Lecture and Panel Discussion: ‘Hip-Hop Education Propelling and Preserving the Movement’ that provides an overview of Hip-Hop education and its importance.

This can be accessed here.

OPTIONAL:

Reading (15 min) OR Video Micro-Lectures (5-15 min)

A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

OR

A set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

This can be accessed here.

Audio

(5 to 60 min)

Music album titled ‘The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos’ by rapper Baba Brinkman that contains 24 tracks (1 to 6 minutes in length)

This can be accessed here. (NOTE: May require purchase)

OR for free access at ‘Talks at Google’

Reading

(5 min)

A review of the album by Scientific American titled ‘Rapper's Lyrics about Climate Change Are Smart’.

This can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduction to Hip-Hop Education As an educator you may wish to read ‘The World IS Yours: A Brief History of Hip-Hop Education’ by Martha Diaz, Education Chair- Universal Hip-Hop Museum and Founder – Hip-Hop Education Center as an introduction to Hip-Hop education.

 

This resource can be accessed at:

https://www.academia.edu/1088920/The_World_IS_Yours_A_Brief_History_of_Hip_Hop_Education

(Note: Requires sign up for free access)

 

Further, you may wish to watch a panel discussion hosted by the Columbia University School of Professional Studies Community Scholars Lecture and Panel Discussion, ‘Hip-Hop Education: Propelling and Preserving the Movement’ that provides an overview of Hip-Hop education and its importance.

 

This resource can be accessed at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKTqblvPrrY

 

Both these resources serve as excellent introductory resources towards how popular and contemporary material such as Hip-Hop and Rap music can be used as an effective pedagogical tool in the classroom. Rap music is an especially effective form of communicating and connecting with the youth. It is an extremely powerful tool that can make students understand the current climate crisis and an effective way to introduce the science of Earth’s climate, global warming, and its impacts.

2 OPTIONAL

Introduction to  Climate Change

Optional: You may wish to introduce the basics of climate change and global warming to your students using the following resources. These resources may be especially useful for students of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

 

This resource can be accessed at:

https://climate.nasa.gov/causes/

 

You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures, ‘Climate Change: Lines of Evidence’. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

 

They include:

1.       What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1

2.       Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2

3.       Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3

4.       Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4

5.       How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5

6.       Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6

7.       Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed at:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?annotation_id=annotation_709415&feature=iv&list=PL38EB9C0BC54A9EE2&src_vid=qEPVyrSWfQE

 

3 Audio; The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos by Baba Brinkman Instruct your students to listen to the album ‘The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos’ by Baba Brinkman prior to coming to the classroom if you are using the ‘Flipped Classroom’ style of pedagogy. Alternatively you may select and play particular tracks from the album during the lecture.

 

This album contains 24 tracks that explain the science and politics of climate change. The album can be found at https://music.bababrinkman.com/album/the-rap-guide-to-climate-chaos

 

Note that the album is available for purchase at the link above.

 

The tracks are available for free viewing on YouTube as part of Baba Brinkman’s performance for ‘Talks At Google’. This free resource can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1ZH6R3Idb4&t=759s

 

Tracks

1. Options 04:35

2. I.P.C.C. 03:59

3. Keep It Positive 01:23

4. Greenhouse (feat. Aaron Nazrul) 04:39

5. Party Don't Stop 01:05

6. Run the Joules 03:01

7. Mo Carbon Mo Problems 01:21

8. What's Beef (feat. Bill Nye) 05:27

9. Battle Lines 01:39

10. Lost in the Numbers 05:05

11. Bright Side 01:36

12. Fossil Fuel Ballers (feat. Aaron Nazrul) 04:45

13. Exxon Knew 01:23

14. Laudato Si 04:41

15. Yank the Plug 01:29

16. Make It Hot 05:57

17. Regulators 01:59

18. Carbon Bubble (feat. Mariella) 05:00

19. Stranded Assets 01:41

20. Ride Electric (feat. Fand) 04:34

21. This or That 01:23

22. Freedom Ain't Free 04:04

23. Stand Up 01:34

24. Makin' Waves (feat. Gaia's Eye) 05:54

 

Introduce the album to your class and discuss the following.

 

Overview: Baba Brinkman’s Rap Guide to Climate Chaos is a hip-hop album that aims to educate people on issues of climate change by staying true to the tradition of knowledge through rhymes in the genre. The album features 24 tracks that address climate change. In songs such as ‘IPCC’, he addresses the findings of the committee and even internal disagreements on projections. On songs such as ‘Greenhouse’, he takes the listener through a sonic journey of development including the greenhouse effect, predicted rise in global temperatures from Svante’s study and puts them alongside the findings of the IPCC and its accuracy. He critiques his own consumption and the paradox of being unable to individually contribute to reducing the impact of climate change without large scale policy reforms. Brinkman speaks extensively about cap and trade vs climate taxes, and the ecological debt that richer countries owe the marginalized. The album also focuses on Exxon’s failures and lies and how what they have done is committed a criminal offence.

 

Direct your students to note how Brinkman addresses problems of capitalism and proposes economic solutions including what can be categorized as green capitalism. Ask them to make note of his references to economic policies, individual hypocrisies, ecological debt, geophysics and political policies along with how theological institutions can address climate change.

 

 

As a High School or Undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about national/international environmental protection, negative externalities such as global warming, and market failure associated with climate change.

This lesson plan allows you to teach your students about the balance between economic progress and environmental protection. It includes resources to teach your students about the influence of the environment on economic output, the role of global warming as an externality, and climate change as a market failure. Further, this lesson plan includes an engaging classroom game/activity for students to participate in decision making exercises to evaluate the tradeoff between optimal economic growth and environmental protection for proxy organizations/nations. This will enable them to learn about and apply economic concepts such as green spending, green transfers, carbon tax, and carbon credits.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is environmental protection in economics?
  2. What are negative externalities in economics?
  3. What are the negative externalities associated with climate change?
  4. How does market failure affect the environment?
  5. What type of market failure is climate change?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Protection, Negative Externalities
Market Failure, Carbon Tax
Green Spending, Green Transfers
Carbon Credits
Climate Topic Energy, Economics, and Climate Change;
Location Global, USA
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
2 sessions, 50 – 60 min each

Contents

Teaching Module (35 min) A teaching module to introduce the concept of environmental protection in economics and the negative externalities associated with it.

This can be accessed here.

Reading (7 min) A reading to explain why economists consider climate change as a market failure.

This can be accessed here.

Reading (30 min): Homework Assignment A research article that evaluates greenhouse gas emissions induced global warming as an economic externality.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity  (45-60 min) A classroom group activity/game to apply theoretical economic concepts in the context of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Session 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Use the teaching module, ‘Introduction to Environmental Protection and Negative Externalities’ by OpenStaxTM, Rice University, to introduce your students to the concept of environmental protection in economics and the negative externalities associated with it. Navigate to the different sections to teach about topics such as ‘The Economics of Pollution, ‘Market -Oriented Environmental Tools’, and ‘The Tradeoff between Economic Output and Environmental Protection’. Use the module to explain positive and negative externalities, equilibrium price and quantity, and market failure. Finally, discuss why global warming is an international economic externality.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Develop the topic further

Use the short video clip of The Carbon Brief Interview, ‘Hoesung Lee on carbon pricing’, to reiterate the concept of global warming as a negative eternality. Dr Hoesung Lee is a Professor of Economics of Climate Change, Energy, and Sustainable Development, Korea University, and has served as vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

This video clip can be accessed here.

Use the Nobel Laureate William D. Nordhaus’ speech at the Nobel Banquet, 10 December 2018, to emphasize on global warming as a negative externality on economic growth and its relevance for international economic policies.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 3: Discuss further

Use ‘The Guardian’ article, ‘Why do economists describe climate change as a market failure?’ by Alex Bowen, Simon Dietz, and Naomi Hicks, reproduced by The London School of Economics and Political Science and Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, to discuss ‘greenhouse gas externality’ and climate change as a market failure.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Extend understanding:

Homework Assignment

Close the first session by instructing your students to read the research article, ‘Global Warming and Economic Externalities’ by Armon Rezai et al., Economic Theory, 49(2):329-351, February 2012, to enable them to understand the role of global warming as an economic externality in economic equilibrium paths. Direct your students to use this reading to extract discussion points about the market failure of climate change and the required mitigation investment to correct it.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 5: Session 2: Apply understanding

Begin the second session by initiating a classroom discussion about climate change as a market failure (10-15 min). Encourage your students to discuss the various points extracted from the research article given as homework reading assignment to enable a broader understanding of the topic. Highlight the importance and requirement of mitigation investment to correct this market failure.

Use ‘The Economics Network’ classroom activity/game, ‘The Global Climate Change Game’ by James Copestake and Tom Ellum, University of Bath, to enable your students to apply the theoretical economic concepts discussed in this lesson plan. Use this engaging game to highlight key challenges in climate change negotiations between groups. Groups are required to assess their economic growth vis a vis contributing to global ‘green spending’ (public good benefit).

First, pass around copies of handouts of background information (link given in activity page) to enable understanding about global public goods, climate change and development finance. Highlight the role of negative externalities like global warming. Reiterate climate change as a market failure and thus, the need for mitigation and adaptation economic pathways. Use this reading to discuss the Kyoto Agreement, the Annex 1 and Annex 2 countries, and to explain concepts such as abatement curves, carbon debt, carbon tax, and Carbonaid.

Follow the instructions to conduct the activity. You may choose one or many of the suggestions for variations/extensions of this activity to enable students’ application of diverse theoretical economic concepts.

Finally, use the activity to initiate a discussion about your nation’s policies for environmental protection versus achieving optimal economic output.

This can be accessed here.

As an Undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching climate mitigation environmental policies and specifically about the cap-and-trade system.

This lesson plan allows you to teach about economic policy responses to climate change. This lesson plan includes resources to explain various policy approaches to mitigating climate change such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, their differences, and advantages. It includes an engaging classroom activity to help your students to apply economical concepts such as price formation, market-based incentives, and transferable quotas/permits; and learn about carbon pricing, carbon taxes, and the cap-and-trade environmental policy.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

Carbon Pricing Dashboard by The World Bank

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Mitigation Environmental Policy,

Pricing, Market-based Incentives,

Transferable Quotas/Permits,

Cap-and-trade, Carbon Taxes, Carbon Pricing

Climate Topic Energy, Economics, and Climate Change;

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Ofline
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 90 min

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a carbon pricing policy?
  2. What is the cap-and-trade system?
  3. Compare the carbon tax and the cap-and-trade policies. Which system do you support?
  4. The cap-and-trade policy would be effective in reducing worldwide emissions if all countries participate. Explain how this would affect the economic growth of your nation.
  5. Climate change is a global issue and the cap-and-trade policy would raise the cost of living especially affecting the poorer nations. How could governments address this issue through their economic policies?

Contents

Teaching Module (30-45 min) A teaching module to introduce and discuss the cap-and-trade environmental policy to mitigate climate change. This can be accessed here.
Classroom/ Laboratory activity  (30 – 45 min) An engaging classroom activity using a mobile app or a paper-based interaction, to enable a better understanding of the cap-and-trade system. This can be accessed here.
1 Topic introduction and discussion Use the teaching module, ‘Cap and trade environmental policies’ by the CORE Project, to introduce climate change mitigation policies such as carbon pricing. Use the module to teach about economic tools such as carbon taxes and the cap-and-trade policy.

 

Discuss the given examples of the cap-and-trade systems used in the past to highlight its benefits. Use the exercises given in text to enable your students to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the carbon tax and the cap-and-trade systems. Note that these exercises involve some extensive readings.

This can be accessed here.

2 Apply understanding Use the working paper, ‘For want of a chair: teaching price formation using a cap and trade game’ by Stefano Carattini et al., provided by the London School of Economics and Political Science, to engage your students in an in-class game to apply their understanding of economic concepts such as price formation, market-based incentives, and trading of quotas/permits. Use this game to highlight key tenets of environmental economics such as carbon pricing and carbon markets.

 

Use this activity to enable your students to play the role of policy makers and extend their understanding of carbon pricing policies such as carbon taxes and the cap-and-trade systems. Follow the instructions as outlined in the paper to engage the students in either a mobile app (ClassEx) or paper-based interaction. A video guide to using the ClassEx software can be found in the additional resources section of this lesson plan. Finally, encourage your students to discuss their understanding of how emissions trading systems work and how they could use this to assess their nation’s environmental economic policies.

This can be accessed here.

As an Undergraduate teacher in the Social Sciences, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about the gender dimensions in the field of climate change.

Climate change is a defining factor of human development in recent times. It is not only a topic for scientific or technical discourse but important for its influence on social, economic, and political conditions with wide reaching effects on social justice and gender equality. Power structures, cultural and social constructs have been responsible for the gender norm- rights, roles, capacities, preferences-across the world and, often climate change impacts women more than it does men. A range of different factors such as age, ethnicity, and class define the nature of these differences. The discrepancy also exists in the participation of women in climate policy and action.

This lesson plan provides teaching resources to introduce gender, sex, and sexuality studies to your students. It focuses on understanding the gender dimensions of climate change in terms of its impacts, representation, and participation. The lesson plan includes resources for your students to better understand climate change and gender in agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disasters, heath, waste, water, and migration amongst others.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach aspects of Gender Studies in your Social Sciences classroom. This lesson plan can be used as a module in a Gender Studies course or it can be used in the Gender section of an Introduction to Sociology course.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does climate change impact women?
  1. Why do women face limitations in participation in climate policy and responses?
  2. What are the gender dimensions of climate change and its impacts on
  • Agriculture
  • Biodiversity
  • Consumption
  • Disasters
  • Energy
  • Forests
  • Health
  • Migration
  • Population
  • Tourism
  • Transport
  • Waste
  • Water

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Women’s Studies, Justice

Human Rights, Women’s Rights

Climate Topic Climate and Society

Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 120 min

Contents

Reading

(10-30 min)

A reading to introduce Gender, Sex and Sexuality studies from OpenStax books. This chapter is part of the ‘Introduction to Sociology 2e” open access textbook.
Video

(18 min)

A video to introduce gender and climate change by Prof Petra Tschakert, Pennsylvania State University.

 

Readings

(30 -60 min)

A set of readings from GenderCC - Women for Climate Justice website that present gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disasters, heath, waste, water, and migration, amongst others.
1 Introduction to Gender Studies Introduce your students to the lesson plan by providing an overview of Gender, Sex, and Sexuality studies. You may proceed with your own lecture material or can provide your students with an introductory reading from OpenStax books. This open-access textbook titled ‘Introduction to Sociology 2e’ provides an excellent introduction to different topics in Sociology including Gender Studies. The book has been authored by several university faculty and includes instructor and student resources.

It can be accessed at:

https://openstax.org/details/books/introduction-sociology-2e

The section on Gender, Sex, and Sexuality can be accessed here.

Different aspects of the field are covered in this resource and include difference between sex and gender, gender identity, homophobia and heterosexism in society, transgender, transsexual, and homosexual identities, socialization on gender roles, stratification of gender in institutions, gender from the view of each sociological perspective, different attitudes associated with sex and sexuality, sexual inequality in various societies, theoretical perspectives on sex and sexuality, amongst others.

2 Introduction to Climate Change and Gender Next, introduce the topic of gender and climate change by using a video by Prof Petra Tschakert, Pennsylvania State University.

This resource can be accessed here.

In this video Prof Tschakert discusses the importance of gender and other dimensions of identity and inequality in the context of climate

change. Emphasize to your students, her remarks on how women are

differentially or more severely impacted by climate change but also how it is problematic that women are often portrayed as helpless, as victims of climate change with little knowledge and often no voice or agency.

3 Gender and Climate Change in different sectors Next, discuss with your students the gender dimensions of climate change in different sectors using the GenderCC - Women for Climate Justice website. This resource can be found  here.

It includes the following sections, each of which contains an overview of climate change and gender dimensions of the sector and links to case studies, guidebooks, and reports.

1. Agriculture, gender and climate change https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/agriculture.html

2. Biodiversity, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/biodiversity.html

3. Consumption, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/consumption.html

4. Disaster, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/disaster.html

5. Energy, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/energy.html

6. Forests, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/forests.html

7. Health, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/health.html

8. Migration, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/migration.html

9. Population, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/population.html

10. Tourism, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/population.html

11. Transport, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/transport.html

12. Waste, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/waste.html

13. Water, gender and climate change

https://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/water.html

 

You may choose to discuss the gender dimensions of climate change through a group discussion activity and by assigning sectors to different groups of students. Finally, you may ask students to summarize the gender dimensions of climate change in terms of its impacts, representation, and participation.

As an Undergraduate teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences you can use this lesson plan to teach your students aspects of behavioural science, explain why our brains are wired to ignore climate change, and discuss potential behavioural science solutions to the climate crisis.

This lesson plan provides teaching resources that would help your students learn about some cognitive and psychological factors that influence an individual’s response to climate change. It includes discussions on how the human brain responds most strongly to threats that are direct, visible, and immediate. As the impacts of climate change are rarely such, we tend to have psychological barriers that prevent meaningful sustained climate action for the long term. The lesson plan further includes resources to show how behavioural science could provide some solutions to the climate crisis.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach aspects of Behavioural Psychology in your Social Sciences classroom. This lesson plan can be used as a module in a Behavioral Psychology course or as a topic in Behavioural Psychology in an Introductory Psychology course.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is behavioral psychology?
  2. What cognitive and psychological factors influence responses to climate change?
  3. What is climate psychology?
  4. What are some psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  5. How can behavioral science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Behavioral Psychology
Climate Topic Climate and Society

Climate Change and the Anthroposphere

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 120 min

Contents

Video

(~33 min)

A video containing talks to introduce the science of behavior change hosted by The Royal Institution of Great Britain.

This can be accessed here.

Video lecture

(~22 min)

A video lecture on the cognition of climate change denial by Prof Stephan Lewandowsky from the University of Western Australia.

This can be accessed here.

Video lecture

(~55 min)

A video lecture titled ‘Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall at Talks at Google.

This can be accessed here.

1 Introduction to Science of Behavioural Change Introduce your students to the lesson plan by providing an overview of behavioural psychology and the science of behavioural change. You may proceed with your own lecture material or can provide your students with the video titled ‘The Science of Behaviour Change’. This resource contains three short talks hosted at the Royal Institution. Speakers include:

Prof Susan Michie - Professor of Health Psychology and Director of the Centre for Behaviour Change at UCL.

Nick Chater - researcher, author and editor for the journals Cognitive Science, Psychological Review, and Psychological Science.

Toby Park - Behavioural Insights Team

This resource can be accessed here.

You can use this resource to explain to your students how human beings often do not act in rational ways or do what is best for them. Solutions to critical problems such as climate change may require a behavioural change. This resource can be used to encourage your students to think about how people make decisions. Further, they can understand what interventions may encourage behavioural change that benefits individuals and society.

2 Cognition of Climate Change Denial Next, introduce your students to the topic of climate psychology. Use the video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Prof Stephan Lewandowsky from the University of Western Australia, hosted by the University of Sydney.

This resource can be accessed here.

In this video, Prof Lewandowsky discusses “some of the cognitive and psychological variables that determine people’s responses to climate science.” Emphasize to your students, his findings on people’s level of comprehension of climate data and climate science. Further discuss with your students, Prof Lewandowsky’s results on how ideology plays a significant role in whether an individual accepts or rejects climate science.

3 Climate Psychology: Why Our Brains Ignore Climate Change Next, discuss with your students what is climate psychology. Use the video titled ‘Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall at Talks at Google.

This resource can be accessed here.

In this video, George Marshall discusses how the human brain is wired to ignore the climate crisis even though it is such a critical problem. According to Marshall, the human brain responds most strongly to threats that are direct, visible, immediate, and caused by a defined “enemy”. As the impacts of climate change often tend to be less direct and immediate, we tend to have psychological barriers that prevent meaningful sustained climate action for the long term. Emphasize to your students, how Marshall addresses critical questions such as “What is the psychological mechanism that allows us to know something is true but act as if it is not? And how is it possible that when presented with overwhelming evidence, even the evidence of our own eyes, we can deliberately ignore something while being entirely aware that this is what we are doing?”

Summarize this lecture during your classroom discussion and emphasize the point that behavioural change can provide potential climate change solutions once we better understand human motivational drivers.

As an Undergraduate teacher in the Social Sciences or Environmental Studies, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about how human induced global warming can have significant impacts on food and water security and could be a factor contributing to mass human migrations, lead to political instability, and even war.

This lesson plan examines how the most severe drought recorded (instrumentally) in Syria’s history from 2007-2010 was probably caused due to anthropogenically forced climate change. The drought is thought to have contributed to large scale human migration from farmlands to urban areas and may have been a significant factor in the political unrest and civil war in Syria.

This lesson plan provides teaching resources to introduce how climate change is stressing natural resources in different parts of the world and can lead to political instability, conflict and possibly even state collapse. It focuses on understanding whether the drought in Syria and mass human migrations played a role in the civil war there.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach aspects of Peace and Conflict Studies, International Relations, Natural Resource Management, Risk Assessment, Geopolitics and Security in your Social Sciences or Environmental Studies classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does climate change affect the internal security of a country?
  2. Did climate change cause the drought in Syria from 2007-2010?
  3. What role did food insecurity play in the mass human migration in Syria?
  4. Discuss whether climate change and the drought contributed to the civil war in Syria?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Conflict, Civil War, Geopolitics, Security

International Relations, Risk Assessment

Human Migration, Drought

Climate Topic Climate and Society

Climate Change and Food Security

Disasters and Hazards

Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance

Location Syria
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
 60-120 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading on climate change caused stress on natural resources and its effect on state fragility. This reading is titled ‘Climate Change, the Erosion of State Sovereignty, and World Order’ by Francesco Femia and Caitlin E. Werrell.

This can be accessed here.

Video

(5 min)

A video on climate change as a catalyst for crisis from the Yale Climate Communications series titled ‘Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change’.

This can be accessed here.

Video (20 min) A video from the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming. This video titled ‘Dry Season’ includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States, religion and climate change, deforestation in Indonesia, and how drought contributed to the civil war in Syria. The segment on the war in Syria is reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times.

This can be accessed here.

Readings (30-60 min) A set of readings on Climate Change and the civil war in Syria.

Reading 1: A journal article titled ‘Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought’ by Colin P. Kelley, Shahrzad Mohtadi, Mark A. Cane, Richard Seager, and Yochanan Kushnir in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). This article drew linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria.

Reading 2: A short review article titled ‘Is Climate Change Behind the Syrian Civil War?’ by Prof Dagomar Degroot at Historical Climatology website.

Optional: Reading 3: A journal article that did not find significant linkages between climate change and the Syrian civil war titled ‘Climate change and the Syrian civil war revisited’ by Jan Selby, Omar S. Dahib, Christiane Fröhlich, Mike Hulme in Political Geography

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Introduction

Introduce your students to the lesson plan by discussing how climate change can stress the natural resources of several countries and how this can lead to political instability. Use the reading is titled ‘Climate Change, the Erosion of State Sovereignty, and World Order’ by Francesco Femia and Caitlin E. Werrell from The Center for Climate and Security: Exploring The Security Risks of Climate Change.

This resource is available here.

Use the reading to emphasize how human-induced global warming can have significant impacts on food and water security and can potentially cause mass human migrations, political instability, internal conflict, and, potentially, even civil wars. Discuss with your students the section titled ‘The Six Erosions of State Sovereignty’, especially the ‘Catch-22 States’ and ‘Brittle States’ in which the 2007-2010 drought of Syria led to massive crop failure, mass human migration and “accelerated Syria’s transition from relative stability to being one of the most conflict-ridden states in the world.”

 

Step 2: Discuss Climate Change, The Drought and Civil War in Syria

Use two videos to explain to your students the linkages between global warming and changes in weather patterns leading to the most severe drought instrumentally recorded in the history of Syria. Explore whether the drought contributed to civil and political unrest in Syria.

Your students may first watch a short video (5 min) on climate change as a catalyst for the crisis from the Yale Climate Communications series titled ‘Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change’ available  here..

Next, ask your students to watch a video from the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming. This video titled ‘Dry Season’ includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria. You may choose to have your students watch just the sections pertaining to Syria which are interspersed in the video. The segment on the war in Syria is reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times.

This resource can be accessed here.

 

Step 3: Extend Understanding-Climate Change, The Drought and Civil War in Syria

Next, provide your students with a journal article titled ‘Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought’ by Colin P. Kelley, Shahrzad Mohtadi, Mark A. Cane, Richard Seager, and Yochanan Kushnir in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

This resource can be accessed  here.

 

This article from 2015 first drew linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria. The authors separated the natural variability of Syrian climate from anthropogenically induced climate change and concluded that warming and drying weather trend was caused due to human influence.

Ask your students to summarize and discuss the main findings of this research article. You may choose to provide them with a short and simpler review article titled ‘Is Climate Change Behind the Syrian Civil War?’ by Dr Dagomar Degroot at Historical Climatology website to further their understanding.

This resource is available here.

 

Optional:

The work of Kelley et al. (2015) is often cited as an example of climate change contributing to civil war. However there has been some debate around their findings. A recent journal article from 2017 titled ‘Climate change and the Syrian civil war revisited’ by Jan Selby, Omar S. Dahib, Christiane Fröhlich, Mike Hulme in Political Geography challenged the findings of Kelley et al. (2015). The authors report that they did not find significant linkages between climate change and the Syrian civil war.

This can be accessed here.

You may choose to ask your students to read both articles and to discuss and debate whether there is scientific evidence for linking the drought in Syria from 2007 to 2010 with anthropogenically forced global warming. And if the drought caused large scale human migration, led to political unrest and finally the civil war. You may emphasize to your students the scientific process which often involves divergent views.

 

 

As a High School or Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students about climate change and global warming and specifically the impacts of climate change in South Africa.

This lesson plan provides an introduction to climate change, causes and impacts of climate change globally, climate change risk profile for South Africa that includes climate impacts on major sectors of the country such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters. This lesson plan also includes the current and future health risks in South Africa due to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? What are the causes of global warming?
  2. What are the global impacts of climate change?
  3. What are the impacts of climate change in South Africa?
  4. How will increased temperatures impact South Africa?
  5. How will changing weather patterns including changes in precipitation, storms, droughts impact South Africa in the future?
  6. What are the current and future health risks due to climate change?
  7. What risks does climate change pose to human health in South Africa with respect to malaria, dengue fever, and undernutrition?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Earth Sciences

Environmental Sciences

Geography

Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Change, Global Warming

Climate Change Risk Profile of South Africa

Health Impacts of Climate Change

Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change

Climate Variability Record

Climate and Health

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading (15 min) and Video Micro-Lectures

(5-15 min)

A reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website that includes contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Optional:  A set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) on climate change and global warming developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

This can be accessed here.

Readings

(30 min)

A set of two readings by Climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners, USAID, to explain climate change in South Africa.

This can be accessed at:

Reading 1 ; Reading 2

Reading

(15 min)

A reading by the World Health Organization on how climate change can impact human health in South Africa.

This can be accessed here.

1 Introduction to the Climate Change Introduce to your students what is climate change and global warming using a reading from the NASA Global Climate Change website. This resource contains information about what is the scientific evidence for climate change, causes and impacts of climate change.

This resource can be accessed here.

 Optional: You may choose to provide your students with further information about global climate change using a set of video micro-lectures. This set of 7 of short video micro-lectures (2-5 minutes in length) have been developed by the National Research Council, The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

They include:

  1.        What is Climate? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 1
  2.        Is Earth Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 2
  3.        Greenhouse Gases. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 3
  4.        Increased Emissions. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 4
  5.        How Much Warming? Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 5
  6.        Solar Influence. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 6
  7.        Natural Cycles. Climate Change, Lines of Evidence Chapter 7

This video playlist can be accessed here.

2 Readings; Climate Change in South Africa Use a set of two readings by Climatelinks: A Global Knowledge Portal for Climate and Development Practitioners, USAID, to explain climate change in South Africa to your students.

A.     First, use the factsheet Climate Change Risk Profile: Southern Africa which is a factsheet on climate change risk profiles for the southern part of the African continent. This factsheet (9 pages) includes the climate summary, historical and future climate, impacts on major sectors such as agriculture, water resources, human health, ecosystems, energy, infrastructure, and disasters, for Southern Africa including the country of South Africa.

 

This resource can be accessed here.

 

B.     Next, use the factsheet Climate Change Information Factsheet: South Africa to emphasize the climate impacts and vulnerabilities for South Africa. This factsheet (4 pages) includes current and future temperature projections, precipitation and flooding, drought, sea level rise and storm surge, and winds and storms.

This resource can be accessed here.

3 Reading: Climate Change and Human Health Impacts in South Africa Use a reading by the World Health Organization (WHO) to stress to your students how climate change can impact human health in South Africa. This factsheet (8 pages) titled Climate Change and Health: Country Profile: South Africa includes information on climate hazard projections for South Africa and current and future health risks of climate change in South Africa. You could use this factsheet to help your students better understand what risks does climate change pose to human health in South Africa with respect to malaria, dengue fever, and undernutrition.

This resource can be accessed here.

 

As a Middle or High School Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, or Geography teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach the Earth’s climate system and help your students understand different aspects of Earth’s climate using simulations. This lesson plan is based on the web-based tool ‘Earth-Like’ developed at the Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan.

This lesson plan introduces Earth’s climate system, an overview of the Earth-Like simulator, and provides a guided exercise that uses the simulator to help your students understand what are the main factors that determine the climate of planet Earth.

There are several factors that impact the surface temperature and the climate of the planet. These include the role of the sun and solar flux incident on the planet, the roles of the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere, the biosphere, the cryosphere, the anthroposphere, and their interactions on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. This lesson plan demonstrates the use of the Earth-Like simulation to explain select aspects of the Earth’s climate system.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach Climate Science and Climate Change in your Earth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and Geography classrooms. This lesson plan is particularly effective to use in a flipped classroom and as a blended learning educational resource.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What would Earth’s average surface temperature be if the sun was a Red Dwarf (0.002 L) like Proxima Centauri? If it was a Yellow-White Dwarf (5 L)?
  2. What role does the incoming solar flux play in determining the average surface temperature of planet Earth?
  3. What do you expect the average surface temperature of the Earth to be if the rate of volcanism increases?
  4. What would Earth’s climate be like if it was much closer to the Sun?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Middle School
Discipline Earth Sciences

Environmental Sciences

Geography

Topic(s) in Discipline Earth’s Climate System, Climate Change
Climate Topic Planetary Climate
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
50 min

Contents

Video Lecture (15 min) A video micro-lecture produced by the University of British Columbia that explains the Earth’s climate system and what determines the climate of planet Earth.

This can be accessed here.

Introduction to Simulator ‘Earth-Like’

(10 min)

The Earth-Like simulator developed at the Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan to understand Earth’s climate system

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(25 min)

A classroom/ laboratory activity that uses the Earth-Like simulator to guide learning about Earth’s climate system and the role that different factors play in determining Earth’s climate and changes to it.
1 Introduction to the Earth’s Climate System Introduce the Earth’s climate system to your students through the video lecture ‘Earth’s Climate System’ developed by the University of British Columbia as part of the course titled ‘Climate Literacy: Navigating Climate Change Conversations’.

 

Emphasize the following topics from the video lecture: What determines the climate of planet Earth, specifically the significant role of the sun and the solar energy flux received on the planet, and the roles of the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and cryosphere.

This resource can be accessed here.

2 Conduct a classroom/ laboratory activity Introduce your students to the Earth-Like simulator developed at the Earth-Life Science Institute, Japan. This simulator was developed as a project from the ELSI Origins Network Planetary Diversity Workshop.

The Earth-Like simulator can be accessed here.

The Earth-Like is a simulator allows you to render new planets and examine the average surface temperature and the climate of the planet by varying the most significant contributors to the Earth’s climate system. The simulator has two options: A classic toolkit and an advanced toolkit. The simulator includes the following:

 

Classic Toolkit

1. Fraction of the planet's surface covered by land

2. The rate of volcanism

3. Position within Habitable zone

 

Advanced Toolkit

1. Fraction of the planet's surface covered by land

2. The rate of volcanism

3. The type of sun

4. The distance from the sun

 

Your students can choose either toolkit to evaluate the roles of each of the factors listed above in determining the climate of the planet. The simulator can be used by changing the values of these factors and rendering a new planet. The results are given in terms of the average surface of the temperature of the new planet and are compared with that of our current-day Earth.

 

The Earth-Like website also includes a brief description of climate science and specifically the role of land fraction cover with an emphasis on the weathering reaction, rate of volcanic degassing, solar insolation levels, the planetary thermostat and the carbon cycle. A description of the model and the mathematics behind it is also provided.

 

Give your students an assignment and ask them to answer the following questions. At the end of each question, emphasize to your students how varying each factor changes the average surface temperature of the planet. This will allow them to better understand the role of these factors in determining planet Earth’s climate. The solutions to the assignment are provided as a separate downloadable document.

Download assignment

As an Undergraduate Earth Sciences, Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you teach how to program in Python and build a computational model of the Earth’s climate system.

Ice Albedo Effect

This lesson plan includes discussions, activities, and a detailed guide of how to create a model to understand the role of the cryosphere in determining the climate of the planet and specifically the Ice Albedo Feedback.

This lesson plan focuses on important questions such as why did the Ice Ages occur? Or, how did the “Snowball Earth” – a time when the entire planet was covered in ice, come to occur? And what are the driving forces behind these phenomena? The resources of this lesson plan include material to help understand the dominant role of the Sun and its energy on the climate of the planet and how climate on Earth responds to the changes in the Solar Constant. It focuses on the ice-albedo feedback cycle, a phenomenon that influences this response strongly and allows for a better understanding of some of the mechanisms that explain Ice Ages and Snowball Earth like climate catastrophes.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to teach a climate science topic in Earth Sciences, Mathematics, and Computer Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is “Snowball Earth”?
  2. What is the role of the Sun in determining the average surface temperature of planet Earth?
  3. What is the Ice Albedo Feedback?
  4. Why do Ice Ages occur?
  5. How do you write a simple computational model in Python?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Earth Sciences, Mathematics, Computer Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Ice Albedo Feedback, Ice Ages, Snowball Earth,

Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Constant,

Computational Modelling with Python

Climate Topic Climate and the Cryosphere,

Long term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms,

Climate Variability Record, Planetary Climate

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
1-2 hours

Contents

Video micro-lectures

(6 min)

Two video micro-lectures that introduce concepts of “Snowball Earth” and the Ice Albedo Feedback by National Geographic and by Prof David Archer, The University of Chicago, respectively.

These can be accessed at:

Snowball Earth from National Geographic

The Ice Albedo Feedback Prof David Archer

Teaching Module

(35 min)

A set of tutorials to learn basic syntax in Python: ‘Introduction to Python: Beginners Guide and Tutorials’
Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(60 min)

A programming activity with a detailed step-by-step guide to building the Ice Albedo feedback model using Python.

These can be accessed as separate downloadable documents.

1 Introduction to the Lesson Plan A.     Introduce this lesson plan to your students by asking some important leading and deep questions such as:

·       Why do Ice Ages occur?

·       Why do they occur periodically?

·       Why did we have climate catastrophes such as the “Snowball Earth” when the entire planet was covered with ice?

·       How do we get out of such catastrophic events?

·       How resilient is life to have survived these climate catastrophes?

 

You may begin your lesson with providing the following background information to your students.

 

o   While there have been only two known Snowball Earth events in the entire history of the planet, Ice Ages are cyclic phenomena occurring roughly every 100,000 years. The Sun is the dominant source of energy on Earth and to the first degree, the Earth’s climate is determined by the energy we receive from the Sun. In terms of the incident solar power per unit area, called the Solar Constant, a higher solar constant would correspond to a hotter Earth while a lower one to lower temperatures.

o   In this lesson plan we focus on changes in the Solar Constant on long time scales of tens of thousands of years to understand its role in determining Earth’s climate. This kind of change is largely driven by Earth’s orbital parameters; its eccentricity, obliquity, and precession - the Milankovitch cycles. We then focus on the question of precisely how climate on Earth responds to the changes in the Solar Constant. The ice-albedo feedback cycle influences this response strongly.

o   Albedo is the reflectivity of a planet. A higher albedo or greater reflectivity of the planet surface leads to a decrease in the surface temperatures. As surface temperatures decrease and more ice is formed the albedo of the planet further increases due to ice being more reflective and consequently this leads to further decrease in surface temperatures. This is an example of a positive feedback and is known as the Ice Albedo feedback. In this lesson plan we study how equilibrium is achieved in such a cycle, analyze the process with different solar constants, and build an overall understanding of some of the mechanisms to understand Ice Ages.

 

We will understand these important concepts through a hands-on activity of creating an iterative ice albedo feedback model in Python.

 

B.     Play a short video ‘Snowball Earth’ by National Geographic as a basic introduction of what is Snowball Earth and emphasize that such climate catastrophes have occurred in Earth’s past.

 

This resource can be accessed at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX3pHD7NH58

 

C.     Also introduce your students to the Ice Albedo feedback through a video micro-lecture by Prof David Archer, The University of Chicago as part of an online course on Global Warming Science.

 

This resource can be accessed at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXCTvoWGyVM

2 Prepare for Python Programming; By installing Jupyter Notebook Ask your students to install a Python programming environment on their computers. For beginners, we recommend using Jupyter Notebooks. This environment allows you to access tutorials and a programming space where students can simultaneously read instructions and try their hands at programming. To access Jupyter Notebooks, install the ‘Anaconda-Navigator’ from the following link. Once it is successfully installed on your computer, navigate to the homepage of the software, and click on ‘Install’ in the ‘Jupyter Notebook’ tab. Once installed, launch the notebook- the ‘Jupyter notebook Homepage’ will open as a webpage. Open a new ‘Python 3’ file to begin coding.

 

The Anaconda-Navigator installer can be accessed at:

https://www.anaconda.com/products/individual

 

3 Introduction to Programming with Python Use the link to the Python tutorial database to teach the basics of Python programming such as printing text, defining variables, simple arithmetic operations, import and use of the ‘numpy’ and ‘matplotlib’ libraries, defining arrays and lists, using indices with arrays and lists, and loops (specifically ‘for’ loops). These introductory skills will be required for the ensuing classroom/laboratory activity.

 

The Python tutorial database can be accessed at:

https://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/Programmers

 

4 Classroom/Laboratory Activity Have your students begin with the classroom activity of developing the Ice-Albedo Feedback Model using Python. This exercise has been adopted from Prof David Archer's course titled “Global Warming II: Create your own models in python”, available on Coursera at https://www.coursera.org/learn/global-warming-model

 

A detailed step-by-step guide for this activity is provided here:

 

In pdf format: https://tropicsu.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Tutorial-Ice-Albedo-Feedback-Model.pdf

 

Share the instruction manual for the exercise with each student. The manual walks you through the entire process of developing the model on Python. Download the notebook using the links provided. To open it, launch Jupyter notebook from the Anaconda-Navigator. From the homepage, go to ‘downloads’ folder from the directory and search for the manual. If you want the students to work their way through the exercise themselves, you may avoid sharing the manual with them. Instead, use it to motivate them in the right direction with hints.

 

Quiz : “Carbon and the climate” Video: Who Is Responsible For Climate Change? Who Needs To Fix It?

As an Undergraduate Economics or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching social theories in Marxism.

Karl Marx (1818 – 1883)

This lesson plan will allow you to introduce Marxism in social theory taught across Sociology, Political Science, Economics, and other disciplines. It includes teaching the socio-economic ideologies presented in Das Kapital which can serve as a prelude to discussions on contemporary social problems. By describing the foundations of Marx’s theory of Capitalism and its historical development, you can use this lesson plan to explain capitalism’s influence on climate change. This lesson plan includes resources to teach your students about carbon markets and to use Marxist concepts to evaluate the effect of carbon markets on present day capitalism.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics or Social Sciences.

Want to know about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are Marx’s main tenets about Capitalism?
  2. What are Marx’s fundamental problems with Capitalism?
  3. What were Marx’s ideas to reform Capitalism?
  4. Does Marxist theory support carbon markets and the greening of Capitalism?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Marxist Theory of Capitalism, Das Kapital,

Theory of Value, Working Class, Labor Time,

Historical Materialism, Greening Capitalism, Climate Capitalism

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change;

Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
120 min

Contents

Readings

(20 min)

A news article to introduce Karl Marx’s Das Kapital and his theory of Capitalism.

This can be accessed here.

A reading to discuss Marx’s life and works, and the economic and philosophical ideologies proposed by him.

This can be accessed here.

Video lecture

(45 min)

A video lecture to explain the basis of Marx’s Capitalist Theory. This is a part of a series of lectures about Marxist Theories.

This can be accessed here.

Video 

(~12 min)

A video interview to discuss the historical evolution of Marx’s Capitalist Theory in the context of climate change.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(45 min)

A research article about a Marxist assessment of carbon markets and their role in the evolution of global capitalism.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the brief write-up, ‘What is Marx’s Das Kapital?’ by Brian Wheeler for BBC, to introduce the topic of Marxist Theory of Capitalism.
  2. Use the reading to describe the socio-political circumstances of when the Das Kapital was written, the essential ideas promulgated by it, and how the historical context of the Marxist Theory of Capitalism has evolved over time.

This reading can be accessed here.

  1. Use the reading, ‘Karl Marx’ by the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, to describe the socio-political contexts in Karl Marx’s biography and to initiate a discussion about his written works.
  2. Use the sub-sections to summarize the Marxist ideologies in his early writings, about economics, the theory of history, and the morality in his works.
  3. Finally, encourage your students to debate the juxtaposition of his ideas about capitalism and communism.

This reading can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Use the video lecture, ‘Marx’s Theory of Capitalism’ by Prof Shapiro, Yale University, to explain the basis of Marx’s theory of Capitalism around what defines value and how wealth can be created.
  2. Explain how this can be viewed from both a micro and macro socio-economic standpoint.
  3. Use the video lecture to describe Marx’s definition of a working class and modes of production.
  4. Explain the differences in class-in-itself and class-for-itself in capitalist society.
  5. Use the lecture to elaborate on the use of both human and non-human resources, and necessary and surplus labor time, in capitalism.
  6. Note: This video lecture is the first of two lectures that describe Marx’s ideologies of Capitalism and Historical Materialism. This lecture is available to download in audio and video formats, has downloadable lecture notes and suggestions for assignments to enhance learning.

This video lecture is available here.

 

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the video interview, ‘Marxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?’ by Prof Graham Murdock, Loughborough University, UK, to discuss the impact of capitalism on climate change.
  2. Draw attention to Marx’s commentary on the breakdown of the relationship of humans with nature due the industrialization of agricultural practices.
  3. Further, discuss how Marx’s analysis on ecology could also provide the solutions to problems in the context of climate change.

This video can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Assignment and Classroom Discussion

  1. Carbon markets are important for the global efforts to address climate change. Use the paper ‘Greening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets’ by Steffen Böhm et al, Organization Studies (2012) to evaluate carbon markets.
  2. Begin by explaining that the paper reviews four Marxist concepts- metabolic rift; capitalism as world ecology; uneven development and accumulation through dispossession; and sub-imperialism for this analyzing carbon markets.
  3. Instruct your students to read the research paper and summarize it in an in-class discussion.
  4. Use the article’s references to introduce the concept of ‘climate capitalism’.
  5. Finally, initiate a debate on how carbon markets could affect capitalist dynamics to achieve a sustainable global economy.

This research paper is made available by the author here.

As a high school or introductory undergraduate Chemistry or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the basics of electrochemistry, electrolysis and the application of electrolysis in fuel cells as an alternative source of clean energy.

This lesson plan includes resources to teach about oxidation states, redox reactions, half-cell, cell potentials, electrolysis, and electrolytic cells. It includes a hands-on laboratory activity to teach your students about the application of electrolytic cells for energy generation from fuel cells. These fuel cells offer an alternative to fossil-fuel based energy production which is the main contributor to global warming and climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry or Environmental Sciences.

Want to know about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are redox reactions?
  2. What is electrolysis? Give examples of electrolytic reactions.
  3. What are the differences in voltaic/galvanic and electrolytic cells?
  4. Describe the functioning of a fuel cell.
  5. What is the importance of fuel cell technology in the context of climate change?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Introductory Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Electrochemistry, Reduction and Oxidation (Redox) Chemical Reactions,

Half-cells, Cell Potentials, Electrolysis, Voltaic/Galvanic Cells,

Electrolytic Cells, Fuel Cells

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere,

Climate and the Anthroposphere,

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
2-4 sessions, 40 – 60 min each

Contents

Teaching Module

(25 min)

A teaching module to teach the basics of electrochemistry, oxidation states, redox reactions, half-cells, and cell potentials.

This can be accessed here.

Teaching Module

(15 min)

A teaching module to teach about electrolysis, electrolytic cells, and their applications.

This can be accessed here.

Reading (10 min) A case study to introduce fuel cells, how they work, and the types of fuel cells in use currently.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(3 sessions, 40-60 min each)

A set of hands on laboratory activities to introduce fuel cells and to demonstrate how they are built and can be used to generate energy efficiently.

These can be accessed at:

Activity 1

Activity 2

Activity 3

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Redox reactions and electrochemistry’ by Khan Academy to teach your students the basics of electrochemistry, oxidation states, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, half-cells, cell potentials, galvanic/voltaic cells, and electrolysis.
  2. Use the in-built examples and exercises to extend your students’ understanding of various electrochemistry concepts.
  3. Emphasize on the process of electrolysis and electrolytic cells.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Electrolysis I’ by LibreTextsTM, UC Davis, to teach about electrolysis and to describe it quantitatively.
  2. Use the tool to teach how electrolytic cells are constructed and to describe several electrolytic reactions.
  3. Elaborate upon the differences between Voltaic/Galvanic and Electrolytic Cells.
  4. Use the in-built examples and exercises to assess students’ understanding of electrolytic reactions.
  5. Explain how an electrolysis reaction could be evaluated quantitatively.
  6. Finally, discuss how electrolytic reactions could be used for commercial purposes such as electroplating and in fuel cell technology.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the case study, ‘Fuel Cells’ by LibreTextsTM, UC Davis, to introduce fuel cells, describe how they work, and discuss the different types of fuel cells.
  2. Use the tool to describe the hydrogen fuel cell that is used to generate electricity, water, and heat and is used to power vehicles and even spacecraft.
  3. With no byproduct of carbon emissions, discuss how this is a cleaner alternative to fossil fuel-based energy production.
  4. Describe the other fuel cell types and discuss the benefits and limitations of fuel cells.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Apply understanding with a set of hands on laboratory exercises

Use a set of 3 hands on laboratory exercises- ‘Intro to Fuel Cells’, ‘Build a Fuel Cell’, and ‘Fuel Cell Characterization’ by Michael Fitzgerald, Cornell Center for Materials Research, to enable your students to apply their understanding of the various electrochemistry concepts discussed in this lesson plan. You may choose to conduct all or few of these activities.

Note: All the laboratory exercises are structured as complete teaching modules- with learning objectives, background information, step-by-step instructions for conducting the activity, evaluation exercises, and discussion points- and are available for downloading.

These can be accessed at:

  1. Introduction to Fuel Cells
  2. Build a Fuel Cell https://www.ccmr.cornell.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/11/build-a-fuel-cell.pdf
  3. Fuel Cell Characterization

As a high school or introductory undergraduate Chemistry or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the basics of electrochemistry and how the application of electrolysis can potentially reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions.

This lesson plan includes an interactive classroom activity to teach about electrochemical reactions, electrolysis, and electrolytic cells. It also includes resources to explain to your students how electrolysis may be used to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions from large-scale processes such as world-wide cement production. Global cement production contributes significantly to increasing levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide resulting in global warming and climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry or Environmental Sciences.

This is a Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Richa Arora (Shivaji College) and Dr Upasana Issar (Kalindi College), University of Delhi, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Give examples to illustrate the use of electrochemistry in daily life.
  2. What are the differences in voltaic and electrolytic cells?
  3. Explain how electrolysis may be used in large scale cement production to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions.
  4. Describe some possible applications of electrochemical processes to reduce carbon emissions.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Introductory Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Electrochemistry, Half-cells, Salt Bridge,

Reduction and Oxidation (Redox) Chemical Reactions,

Electrolysis, Electrolytic Cells

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere,

Climate and the Anthroposphere,

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
70 – 100 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to teach the basics of electrochemistry, electrochemical reactions, electrolysis, electrolytic cells, and the applications of electrolysis.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(30 min)

An interactive simulation to demonstrate and experiment with the process of electrolysis in electrolytic cells.

This can be accessed here.

Video and Podcast

(10 min)

A brief video to show how carbon dioxide is emitted in producing cement and an audio podcast about the applicability of electrolysis to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in large-scale cement production.

These can be accessed at:

Video

Podcast

Optional: Reading (30 min) A reading to describe the commercial application of electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction technologies.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Electrochemistry’ by LibretextsTM to teach your students the basics of electrochemistry.
  2. Navigate to the relevant sub-sections to explain electrochemical processes such as oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions and electrolysis.
  3. Use the tool to teach about voltaic/galvanic cells and electrolytic cells, and their differences.
  4. Describe Faraday’s law of electrolysis, cell potentials, Half-Cell reactions, Nernst Equation, thermodynamics of electrochemical reactions, and details of redox chemistry.
  5. Finally, describe a few applications of electrolysis such as electroplating and batteries using galvanic cells.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity using an interactive simulation

  1. Use the interactive simulation, ‘Electrolysis’, provided by University of Oregon, to extend your students’ understanding of the process of electrolysis.
  2. Note the ‘Learning Objectives’ to teach your students about the various aspects of electrolysis and electrolytic cells.
  3. Download the attached ‘ElectrolysisCellStudentActivity’ word document as a guide to conduct this activity in the classroom.
  4. Use the link given within the tool to launch the simulation to enable your students to understand the quantitative and qualitative aspects of electrolysis and to visualize how it works at the macroscopic and microscopic levels.
  5. Use the built-in demonstration to explain how the simulation can be used to experiment with the variables involved in operating an electrolytic cell.
  6. Direct your students to run the simulation for different electrolytic conditions and note their observations.
  7. Use the list of questions given under the ‘Learning Outcomes’ tab and in the student activity sheet to assess your students’ understanding of the topic.
  8. Finally, discuss how electrolytic cells are used in real life.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 3: Discuss further using a video and audio podcast

  1. Play the video, ‘Calcium Carbonate- Disintegrating Quicklime’ by the Royal Institute, London, to explain how producing cement results in the release of carbon dioxide through heating and slaking processes, thus adding to atmospheric greenhouse gases that can cause global warming.
  1. Use the audio podcast, ‘New approach suggests path to emissions-free cement’ by the MIT News Office, to explain how the world-wide large-scale cement production significantly contributes towards global carbon emissions.
  2. Use the tool to describe a new process involving electrolysis, developed by MIT researchers, to eliminate carbon emissions from cement production.
  3. The scientific paper detailing this study can be accessed separately in the additional resources section of this lesson plan.

The video can be accessed here.

The podcast can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Optional Reading: Homework Assignment (30 min)

Use the scientific review, ‘Progress toward Commercial Application of Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Reduction’ by Chi Chen et al., Chem, to enable your students to understand how various electrochemical processes are being developed to reduce global carbon emissions that contribute towards global warming and climate change.

This can be accessed here.

As a high school Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about power, energy, and dynamics through the design and function of a wind turbine.

This lesson plan will help you teach various Physics concepts such as power, energy, and dynamics through the working of a wind turbine. In the context of global warming due to carbon emissions, wind power is a renewable and clean source of energy that can be harnessed as electricity by wind turbines. Thus, this lesson plan will enable the students to apply the concepts of energy, electrical energy, and power in a real-world scenario.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

This is a lesson plan developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub (MCCCRH) with contributions by Troy Garrett (Winmalee High School); Dr Sanaa Hobeichi and Dr Ian Macadam (CLEX); Tahnee Burgess and Dr David Holmes (MCCCRH); and Dr. Roger Dargaville (Monash University).

The lesson plan originated at the “Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers” workshop at the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (AMOS) conference held in February 2020 in Fremantle, Western Australia. The workshop was supported by AMOS, CLEX, MCCCRH, the Schools Weather and Air Quality (SWAQ) Citizen Science project, TROP ICSU and the University of Western Australia. A version of the lesson plan tailored for use in Australian classrooms is available at https://www.monash.edu/mcccrh/projects/climate-classrooms.

Curriculum Code (Australia):

  • ACSPH037: Electrical circuits enable electrical energy to be transferred efficiently over large distances and transformed into a range of other useful forms of energy including thermal and kinetic energy, and light.
  • ACSPH039: Energy is conserved in the energy transfers and transformations that occur in an electrical circuit.
  • ACSPH042: Power is the rate at which energy is transformed by a circuit component; power enables quantitative analysis of energy transformations in the circuit.
  • ACSPH065: Energy is conserved in isolated systems and is transferred from one object to another when a force is applied over a distance; this causes work to be done and changes to kinetic and/or potential energy of objects.

Cross Curriculum Priority (Australia): Sustainability

Presumed Knowledge (Australia):

  • Kinetic energy (ACSPH065)
  • Conservation of energy (ACSPH039)
  • Electrical energy and power (ACSPH037)
  • Rate of energy and power (ACSPH042)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Power, Energy, Work, Conservation of Energy, Electrical Energy,

Dynamics, Transformers, Wind Turbine

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
70 min

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is wind energy?
  2. How can wind power be harnessed for electricity using wind turbines?
  3. How can you compute the energy available due to wind?
  4. What are the advantages and challenges of producing electricity from a wind turbine?

Contents of Lesson Plan

Teaching Module (20 min) A teaching module to introduce or reacquaint students with concepts such as energy and power. It also includes a case study highlighting the World’s Energy Use and the need for renewable sources of energy.
This can be accessed here.
Video (~5.5 min) A video to introduce wind turbines and how they harness wind energy (a renewable source) to generate electricity.
This can be accessed here.
Classroom Activity (2.5 min + 40 min) A brief video to explain the physics of wind power followed by a solved word problem to compute the wind energy available for wind turbines to convert to electrical energy.
The video can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘6: Power’ by LibreTextsTM to bring together concepts we have learnt so far- energy, power, work, electrical energy, conservation of energy and transformers.
  2. Play the video tutorial within the text, to teach how numerical problems can be solved for computing values such as energy generated, and work done.
  3. Navigate to the next page (6.7), to read a case study on the World’s Energy Use.
  4. Discuss how fossil fuel-based energy generation is undesirable in the context of climate change and the need to increase the use of renewable and cleaner sources of energy such as wind energy.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Explain to your students that they will now apply their understanding of the different concepts learnt in physics in a real-world situation by looking at how wind turbines work and identify the physics principles behind this form of renewable energy.
  2. Ask your students what they already know about wind turbines and about how they work. Allow the students to respond with their ideas and summarize their main points on the board.
  3. Play the video, ‘How do Wind Turbines Work’ by LearnEngineering, to introduce the topic of using wind energy to generate electricity by wind turbines. Use this video to describe various aspects of wind turbines and the science involved in the electricity they produce.
  4. Allow some time for a classroom discussion following the video. Draw attention to Betz’s Limit as a new idea.

The video can be accessed here.

Step 3: Classroom Activity

  1. Ask your students: How can we determine the kinetic energy of a mass of air of density that is moving at the speed through a turbine of radius r?
  2. Form groups and encourage your students to determine the general formula for calculating the kinetic energy of a mass of moving air. Students will need to combine density ( ρ=m/V) ) with the volume of airflow (V=Av ), the area of a circle ( A=πr2)with the kinetic energy formula (1/2 mv2 ) to define the kinetic energy of a mass of air as (KE=1/2 πr2 ρv3 ).
  3. Play the video, ‘The Physics of Wind Power: how does a wind turbine work?’ by the European Energy Centre (EEC) to elucidate how the kinetic energy of a mass of air moving through a wind turbine can be determined. This can be accessed here.
  4. Solve a word problem with guidance:

Consider a wind turbine with a span of 100 m is situated at a site, subjected to constant 8ms(-1) wind. If the air density is 1.25 kgm(-3), how much kinetic energy passes through the plane of the blades every second?
Solution: We can directly substitute in the formula KE=1/2πr2 ρv3,  but instead we will use a different strategy.

Strategy:

  1.  Determine the area of the plane
  2.  Determine the volume of air passing through plane every second
  3.  Determine the mass of air passing through plane every second
  4.  Calculate the kinetic energy of the mass of air passing through the plane every second

A=πr2
A=π (50)2

A=7854 m2

At 8ms(-1), volume through plane

V=Av
V=7854m2 × 8 ms(-1)
V=62,832 m3 s(-1)
With density of ρ=1.25 kgm(-3)

m=ρV
m=1.25 kg(m)(-3) × 62,832 m3 s(-1)
m=78,540 kgs(-1)

Kinetic energy every second
KE=1/2 mv2
KE=1/2 (78,540 kg s(-1) ) × 82  m2 s(-2)
KE/s  = 2.513×(10)6 Js(-1)

P = 2.513 × (10)6  W = 2513 kW

5. Give a word problem for independent practice
Consider a wind turbine with a span of 50 m is situated at a site, subjected to a constant 12 ms-1 wind. If the air density is 1.23 kgm(-3), how much kinetic energy passes through the plane of the blades every second? Round your answer to 3 s.f.

Solution:
Kinetic Energy every second
(KE)/s =1/2 πr2 ρv3

(KE)/s=1/2 π (50)2 (1.23) (12 ) (m2 )(kg/m3) (m/s)3
(KE)/s=8,340,000 m kg s(-3)
(KE)/s =8.34 × (10) J s(-1)
P = 8.34 × (10)6 W = 8,340  kW

6. Wrap up the session with a discussion on ways other than wind energy to generate sustainable energy. Discuss their benefits and caveats in the context of climate change.

7. Learning Extensions:

Electricity in Households: Draw attention to how this energy can be used in homes. We wish to sell this energy to households, and we need a unit of measure that makes sense to the average person. The unit used is called a kilowatt-hour (kWh) and is defined as the energy delivered to a 1000 W appliance over 1 hour. Determine how much 1 kWh is in terms of joules.

Solution:
P=E/t
E=Pt
E=1000 J s(-1) × 3600  s
E=3.6× (10)6 J

Cost of Electrical Energy: Students to research the cost of electrical energy by visiting power-company websites to get rates. Typical rates in Australia are 0.15-0.30 AUD/kWh.

Students to then determine the revenue generated by this wind turbine per day (by multiplying Energy electrical with the rate they find).

As a high school or introductory undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about insect pollination and the impact of climate change on pollinators, pollinator systems and food security.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach about insect pollination and various plant-pollinator systems. It includes a hands-on activity to teach your students about plant adaptations and nectar guides, different types of pollinators, their role in the natural and man-made world, and the environmental factors that affect pollinator behavior and effectiveness. This lesson plan will further explain how warming global temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, and extreme weather events due to climate change, influence insect pollination.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a plant-pollinator system? Give examples.
  1. How do environmental changes affect insect pollinator behavior?
  1. What is the importance of insect pollination for global food security?
  1. What are the impacts of climate change on insect pollination?

Lesson plan developed with contribution from Gargi Khandelwal, St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India. Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Illustrations by Tejal Vyas, for TROP ICSU

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Pollination, Fertilization, Insect Pollination, Pollinators,

Plant-Pollinator Systems, Adaptations, Nectar Guides,

Types of Pollinators, Pollinator Behavior, Flower Structure,

Flower Mechanics, Pollen Viability, Stigma Receptivity, Pollen Tube Growth

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global, USA
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
2-3 sessions, 45-60 min each

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A brief introduction to insect pollination and types of insect pollinators.

This can be accessed  here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(30-40 min)

A set of hands-on classroom/laboratory and field activities to teach about flower mechanics and adaptations for pollination, and the role of insect pollinators in enabling fertilization and plant reproduction.

These can be accessed at:

For High School

For High School and Undergraduate

Video

(~5 min)

A video to discuss research on bee data and related satellite imagery that shows that climate change is affecting plants and pollination.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: Reading (60 min) A reading to describe the importance of crop pollination by insects, the factors involved, and the impacts of climate change on them.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

      1. Use the reading, ‘Pollination by Insects’ by LibreTextsTM, UC Davis, to briefly introduce the topic of insect pollination to your students.
      2. Use this reading to describe the different types of insect pollinators, plant adaptations and nectar guides.
      3. Discuss how both insects and flowers benefit from the symbiotic relationship in plant-pollinator systems.

      This can be accessed  here.

Step2 : Conduct a set of classroom/laboratory/field activities

  1. Use the hands-on set of classroom/laboratory activities, ‘Bouquet of Flowers’ by Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers, Cornell University, to extend student understanding about flower design, and plant and vector adaptations for pollination.
  2. Use the activities to enable students to learn about and examine pollen grains, pollen tubes, and pollen germination.

This can be accessed here.

  1. Use the hands-on set of field activities, ‘Pollination Ecology: Field Studies of Insect Visitation and Pollen Transfer Rates’ by Judy Parrish, Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology (TIEE), Ecological Society of America, to enable your students to understand plant-pollinator systems, flowering times, insect visitation rates, and pollen ecology.
  2. Use the built-in questions to evaluate student understanding of these topics.
  3. Use the tool to design student lab/field experiments to enable them to test various hypotheses related to the topics, analyze data, and prepare a formal report.
  4. Finally, discuss the student reports in the context of a changing climate. Encourage your students to comment on how their field observations could be affected by global warming, changing precipitation, and extreme weather conditions.

This can be accessed here.

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the video, ‘Sting of Climate Change’ by NASA (Climate Change and Global Warming) to describe an effect of climate change on plants and insect pollination. Use the tool to talk about NASA scientist Wayne Esaias’ research on bee data and related satellite imagery.
  2. Discuss the observations that global warming has resulted in early flowering times that may not coincide with bee visitation periods and thereby, impact pollination in flowering plants.
  3. Finally, talk about the interdependence of bees and flowering plants and how climate change may affect their survival.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Optional Undergraduate Homework Assignment: Reading

  1. Use FAO’s 2011 report, ‘Potential Effects of Climate Change on Crop Pollination’ to enable your students to understand the effects of climate change on pollinators, and the temperature sensitivity of crop pollinators and entomophilous crops.
  1. Instruct your students to read the report as a homework assignment and it follow up with a classroom discussion.
  2. Use the reading to highlight the different climate variables such as temperature, precipitation, and extreme climate events that affect crop pollination.
  3. Further, use the reading to discuss how climate change has affected quality and quantity of nectar and pollen, phenological events, and pollinator behavior, visitation rates, and distribution.
  4. Finally, discuss the economic implications of the effects of climate change on crop pollination and thereby, on global food security.

This can be accessed here.

As a high school Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching Formula Substitution in algebra after introducing formulas, numbers, variables, and constants.

Global warming due to fossil fuel emissions, is believed to be one of the causes for climate change. Therefore, there is an increased interest in the use of renewable and cleaner sources of energy. This lesson plan will help improve students’ literacy in clean energy sources while enabling them to practice Formula Substitution. It includes resources to teach your students about the components of formulas, and substitution in a formula using the energy equation for wind turbines, to enable them to understand the energy available from wind.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Curriculum Code (Australia):

  • ACMEM035: substitute numerical values into algebraic expressions
  • ACMEM036: substitute given values for the other pronumerals in a mathematical formula to find the value of the subject of the formula

Cross Curriculum Priority (Australia): Sustainability

Presumed Knowledge (Australia):

  • Arithmetic with real numbers and the use of index notation (ACMNA150, ACMNA153, ACMNA183, and ACMNA154).
  • Substitute values into formulae to determine an unknown (ACMNA234).
  • Use units of energy to the consumption of electricity (ACMEM031)
  • Convert from one unit of energy to another (ACMEM034)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Formulae and their components: Numbers, Variables, and Constants; Formula Substitution
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 min

This is a lesson plan developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub (MCCCRH) with contributions by Dr Sanaa Hobeichi and Dr Ian Macadam (CLEX); Tahnee Burgess and Dr David Holmes (MCCCRH); and Dr. Roger Dargaville (Monash University).

The lesson plan originated at the “Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers” workshop at the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (AMOS) conference held in February 2020 in Fremantle, Western Australia. The workshop was supported by AMOS, CLEX, MCCCRH, the Schools Weather and Air Quality (SWAQ) Citizen Science project, TROP ICSU and the University of Western Australia. A version of the lesson plan tailored for use in Australian classrooms is available at https://www.monash.edu/mcccrh/projects/climate-classrooms.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US