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As a high school or introductory undergraduate Chemistry or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the basics of electrochemistry and how the application of electrolysis can potentially reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions.

This lesson plan includes an interactive classroom activity to teach about electrochemical reactions, electrolysis, and electrolytic cells. It also includes resources to explain to your students how electrolysis may be used to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions from large-scale processes such as world-wide cement production. Global cement production contributes significantly to increasing levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide resulting in global warming and climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry or Environmental Sciences.

This is a Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Richa Arora (Shivaji College) and Dr Upasana Issar (Kalindi College), University of Delhi, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Give examples to illustrate the use of electrochemistry in daily life.
  2. What are the differences in voltaic and electrolytic cells?
  3. Explain how electrolysis may be used in large scale cement production to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions.
  4. Describe some possible applications of electrochemical processes to reduce carbon emissions.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Introductory Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Electrochemistry, Half-cells, Salt Bridge,

Reduction and Oxidation (Redox) Chemical Reactions,

Electrolysis, Electrolytic Cells

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere,

Climate and the Anthroposphere,

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
70 – 100 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to teach the basics of electrochemistry, electrochemical reactions, electrolysis, electrolytic cells, and the applications of electrolysis.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(30 min)

An interactive simulation to demonstrate and experiment with the process of electrolysis in electrolytic cells.

This can be accessed here.

Video and Podcast

(10 min)

A brief video to show how carbon dioxide is emitted in producing cement and an audio podcast about the applicability of electrolysis to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in large-scale cement production.

These can be accessed at:

Video

Podcast

Optional: Reading (30 min) A reading to describe the commercial application of electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction technologies.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Electrochemistry’ by LibretextsTM to teach your students the basics of electrochemistry.
  2. Navigate to the relevant sub-sections to explain electrochemical processes such as oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions and electrolysis.
  3. Use the tool to teach about voltaic/galvanic cells and electrolytic cells, and their differences.
  4. Describe Faraday’s law of electrolysis, cell potentials, Half-Cell reactions, Nernst Equation, thermodynamics of electrochemical reactions, and details of redox chemistry.
  5. Finally, describe a few applications of electrolysis such as electroplating and batteries using galvanic cells.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity using an interactive simulation

  1. Use the interactive simulation, ‘Electrolysis’, provided by University of Oregon, to extend your students’ understanding of the process of electrolysis.
  2. Note the ‘Learning Objectives’ to teach your students about the various aspects of electrolysis and electrolytic cells.
  3. Download the attached ‘ElectrolysisCellStudentActivity’ word document as a guide to conduct this activity in the classroom.
  4. Use the link given within the tool to launch the simulation to enable your students to understand the quantitative and qualitative aspects of electrolysis and to visualize how it works at the macroscopic and microscopic levels.
  5. Use the built-in demonstration to explain how the simulation can be used to experiment with the variables involved in operating an electrolytic cell.
  6. Direct your students to run the simulation for different electrolytic conditions and note their observations.
  7. Use the list of questions given under the ‘Learning Outcomes’ tab and in the student activity sheet to assess your students’ understanding of the topic.
  8. Finally, discuss how electrolytic cells are used in real life.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 3: Discuss further using a video and audio podcast

  1. Play the video, ‘Calcium Carbonate- Disintegrating Quicklime’ by the Royal Institute, London, to explain how producing cement results in the release of carbon dioxide through heating and slaking processes, thus adding to atmospheric greenhouse gases that can cause global warming.
  1. Use the audio podcast, ‘New approach suggests path to emissions-free cement’ by the MIT News Office, to explain how the world-wide large-scale cement production significantly contributes towards global carbon emissions.
  2. Use the tool to describe a new process involving electrolysis, developed by MIT researchers, to eliminate carbon emissions from cement production.
  3. The scientific paper detailing this study can be accessed separately in the additional resources section of this lesson plan.

The video can be accessed here.

The podcast can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Optional Reading: Homework Assignment (30 min)

Use the scientific review, ‘Progress toward Commercial Application of Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Reduction’ by Chi Chen et al., Chem, to enable your students to understand how various electrochemical processes are being developed to reduce global carbon emissions that contribute towards global warming and climate change.

This can be accessed here.

As a high school Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about power, energy, and dynamics through the design and function of a wind turbine.

This lesson plan will help you teach various Physics concepts such as power, energy, and dynamics through the working of a wind turbine. In the context of global warming due to carbon emissions, wind power is a renewable and clean source of energy that can be harnessed as electricity by wind turbines. Thus, this lesson plan will enable the students to apply the concepts of energy, electrical energy, and power in a real-world scenario.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

This is a lesson plan developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub (MCCCRH) with contributions by Troy Garrett (Winmalee High School); Dr Sanaa Hobeichi and Dr Ian Macadam (CLEX); Tahnee Burgess and Dr David Holmes (MCCCRH); and Dr. Roger Dargaville (Monash University).

The lesson plan originated at the “Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers” workshop at the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (AMOS) conference held in February 2020 in Fremantle, Western Australia. The workshop was supported by AMOS, CLEX, MCCCRH, the Schools Weather and Air Quality (SWAQ) Citizen Science project, TROP ICSU and the University of Western Australia. A version of the lesson plan tailored for use in Australian classrooms is available at https://www.monash.edu/mcccrh/projects/climate-classrooms.

Curriculum Code (Australia):

  • ACSPH037: Electrical circuits enable electrical energy to be transferred efficiently over large distances and transformed into a range of other useful forms of energy including thermal and kinetic energy, and light.
  • ACSPH039: Energy is conserved in the energy transfers and transformations that occur in an electrical circuit.
  • ACSPH042: Power is the rate at which energy is transformed by a circuit component; power enables quantitative analysis of energy transformations in the circuit.
  • ACSPH065: Energy is conserved in isolated systems and is transferred from one object to another when a force is applied over a distance; this causes work to be done and changes to kinetic and/or potential energy of objects.

Cross Curriculum Priority (Australia): Sustainability

Presumed Knowledge (Australia):

  • Kinetic energy (ACSPH065)
  • Conservation of energy (ACSPH039)
  • Electrical energy and power (ACSPH037)
  • Rate of energy and power (ACSPH042)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Power, Energy, Work, Conservation of Energy, Electrical Energy,

Dynamics, Transformers, Wind Turbine

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
70 min

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is wind energy?
  2. How can wind power be harnessed for electricity using wind turbines?
  3. How can you compute the energy available due to wind?
  4. What are the advantages and challenges of producing electricity from a wind turbine?

Contents of Lesson Plan

Teaching Module

(20 min)

A teaching module to introduce or reacquaint students with concepts such as energy and power. It also includes a case study highlighting the World’s Energy Use and the need for renewable sources of energy.

This can be accessed here.

Video

(~5.5 min)

A video to introduce wind turbines and how they harness wind energy (a renewable source) to generate electricity.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom Activity

(2.5 min + 40 min)

A brief video to explain the physics of wind power followed by a solved word problem to compute the wind energy available for wind turbines to convert to electrical energy.

The video can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘6: Power’ by LibreTextsTM to bring together concepts we have learnt so far- energy, power, work, electrical energy, conservation of energy and transformers.
  2. Play the video tutorial within the text, to teach how numerical problems can be solved for computing values such as energy generated, and work done.
  3. Navigate to the next page (6.7), to read a case study on the World’s Energy Use.
  4. Discuss how fossil fuel-based energy generation is undesirable in the context of climate change and the need to increase the use of renewable and cleaner sources of energy such as wind energy.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Explain to your students that they will now apply their understanding of the different concepts learnt in physics in a real-world situation by looking at how wind turbines work and identify the physics principles behind this form of renewable energy.
  2. Ask your students what they already know about wind turbines and about how they work. Allow the students to respond with their ideas and summarize their main points on the board.
  3. Play the video, ‘How do Wind Turbines Work’ by LearnEngineering, to introduce the topic of using wind energy to generate electricity by wind turbines. Use this video to describe various aspects of wind turbines and the science involved in the electricity they produce.
  4. Allow some time for a classroom discussion following the video. Draw attention to Betz’s Limit as a new idea.

The video can be accessed here.

Step 3: Classroom Activity

  1. Ask your students: How can we determine the kinetic energy of a mass of air of density that is moving at the speed through a turbine of radius r?
  2. Form groups and encourage your students to determine the general formula for calculating the kinetic energy of a mass of moving air. Students will need to combine density ( ρ=m/V) ) with the volume of airflow (V=Av ), the area of a circle ( A=πr^2)with the kinetic energy formula (1/2 mv^2 ) to define the kinetic energy of a mass of air as (KE=1/2 πr^2 ρv^3 ).
  3. Play the video, ‘The Physics of Wind Power: how does a wind turbine work?’ by the European Energy Centre (EEC) to elucidate how the kinetic energy of a mass of air moving through a wind turbine can be determined.This can be accessed here.
  4. Solve a word problem with guidance:

Consider a wind turbine with a span of 100 m is situated at a site, subjected to constant 8ms^-1 wind. If the air density is 1.25 kgm^-3, how much kinetic energy passes through the plane of the blades every second?
Solution: We can directly substitute in the formula KE=1/2 πr^2 ρv^3, but instead we will use a different strategy.

Strategy:

  1.  Determine the area of the plane
  2.  Determine the volume of air passing through plane every second
  3.  Determine the mass of air passing through plane every second
  4.  Calculate the kinetic energy of the mass of air passing through the plane every second

A=πr^2
A=π〖.50〗^2
A=7854m^2
At 8ms^(-1), volume through plane

V=Av
V=7854m^2×8ms^(-1)
V=62,832m^3 s^(-1)
With density of ρ=1.25kgm^(-3)

m=ρV
m=1.25〖kgm〗^(-3)×62,832m^3 s^(-1)
m=78,540kgs^(-1)

Kinetic energy every second
KE=1/2 mv^2
KE=1/2 (78,540 kg〖 s〗^(-1) )×8^2 m^2 s^(-2)
K〖E_(/s)〗_ =2.513×〖10〗^6 Js^(-1)
P=2.513×〖10〗^6 W=2513 kW

5. Give a word problem for independent practice
Consider a wind turbine with a span of 50 m is situated at a site, subjected to a constant 12 ms-1 wind. If air density is 1.23 kgm-3, how much kinetic energy passes through the plane of the blades every second? Round your answer to 3 s.f.

Solution:
Kinetic Energy every second
〖KE〗_(/s)=1/2 πr^2 ρ v^3
〖KE〗_(/s)=1/2 π〖(50〗^2)(1.23) (〖12〗^3) (m^2)(kg/m^3 )〖(m/s)〗^3
〖KE〗_(/s)=8,340,000 m^2 kg s^(-3)
〖KE〗_(/s)=8.34×〖10〗^6 J s^(-1)
P=8.34×〖10〗^6 W =8,340 kW

6. Wrap up the session with a discussion on ways other than wind energy to generate sustainable energy. Discuss their benefits and caveats in the context of climate change.

7. Learning Extensions:

Electricity in Households : Draw attention to how this energy can be used in homes. We wish to sell this energy to households, and we need a unit of measure that makes sense to the average person. The unit used is called a kilowatt-hour (kWh) and is defined as the energy delivered to a 1000 W appliance over 1 hour. Determine how much 1kWh is in terms of joules.

Solution:
P=E/t
E=Pt
E=1000 Js^(-1) ×3600 s
E=3.6×〖10〗^6 J

Cost of Electrical Energy: Students to research the cost of electrical energy by visiting power-company websites to get rates. Typical rates in Australia are 0.15-0.30 AUD/kWh . Students to then determine the revenue generated by this wind turbine per day (by multiplying Energy_electrical with the rate they find).

As a high school or introductory undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about insect pollination and the impact of climate change on pollinators, pollinator systems and food security.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach about insect pollination and various plant-pollinator systems. It includes a hands-on activity to teach your students about plant adaptations and nectar guides, different types of pollinators, their role in the natural and man-made world, and the environmental factors that affect pollinator behavior and effectiveness. This lesson plan will further explain how warming global temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, and extreme weather events due to climate change, influence insect pollination.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Lesson plan developed with contribution from Gargi Khandelwal, St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India. Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Pollinators

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a plant-pollinator system? Give examples.
  1. How do environmental changes affect insect pollinator behavior?
  1. What is the importance of insect pollination for global food security?
  1. What are the impacts of climate change on insect pollination?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Pollination, Fertilization, Insect Pollination, Pollinators,

Plant-Pollinator Systems, Adaptations, Nectar Guides,

Types of Pollinators, Pollinator Behavior, Flower Structure,

Flower Mechanics, Pollen Viability, Stigma Receptivity, Pollen Tube Growth

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global, USA
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
2-3 sessions, 45-60 min each

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A brief introduction to insect pollination and types of insect pollinators.

This can be accessed  here.

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(30-40 min)

A set of hands-on classroom/laboratory and field activities to teach about flower mechanics and adaptations for pollination, and the role of insect pollinators in enabling fertilization and plant reproduction.

These can be accessed at:

For High School

For High School and Undergraduate

Video

(~5 min)

A video to discuss research on bee data and related satellite imagery that shows that climate change is affecting plants and pollination.

This can be accessed here.

Optional: Reading (60 min) A reading to describe the importance of crop pollination by insects, the factors involved, and the impacts of climate change on them.

This can be accessed here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

      1. Use the reading, ‘Pollination by Insects’ by LibreTextsTM, UC Davis, to briefly introduce the topic of insect pollination to your students.
      2. Use this reading to describe the different types of insect pollinators, plant adaptations and nectar guides.
      3. Discuss how both insects and flowers benefit from the symbiotic relationship in plant-pollinator systems.

      This can be accessed  here.

Step2 : Conduct a set of classroom/laboratory/field activities

  1. Use the hands-on set of classroom/laboratory activities, ‘Bouquet of Flowers’ by Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers, Cornell University, to extend student understanding about flower design, and plant and vector adaptations for pollination.
  2. Use the activities to enable students to learn about and examine pollen grains, pollen tubes, and pollen germination.

This can be accessed here.

  1. Use the hands-on set of field activities, ‘Pollination Ecology: Field Studies of Insect Visitation and Pollen Transfer Rates’ by Judy Parrish, Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology (TIEE), Ecological Society of America, to enable your students to understand plant-pollinator systems, flowering times, insect visitation rates, and pollen ecology.
  2. Use the built-in questions to evaluate student understanding of these topics.
  3. Use the tool to design student lab/field experiments to enable them to test various hypotheses related to the topics, analyze data, and prepare a formal report.
  4. Finally, discuss the student reports in the context of a changing climate. Encourage your students to comment on how their field observations could be affected by global warming, changing precipitation, and extreme weather conditions.

This can be accessed here.

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the video, ‘Sting of Climate Change’ by NASA (Climate Change and Global Warming) to describe an effect of climate change on plants and insect pollination. Use the tool to talk about NASA scientist Wayne Esaias’ research on bee data and related satellite imagery.
  2. Discuss the observations that global warming has resulted in early flowering times that may not coincide with bee visitation periods and thereby, impact pollination in flowering plants.
  3. Finally, talk about the interdependence of bees and flowering plants and how climate change may affect their survival.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 4: Optional Undergraduate Homework Assignment: Reading

  1. Use FAO’s 2011 report, ‘Potential Effects of Climate Change on Crop Pollination’ to enable your students to understand the effects of climate change on pollinators, and the temperature sensitivity of crop pollinators and entomophilous crops.
  1. Instruct your students to read the report as a homework assignment and it follow up with a classroom discussion.
  2. Use the reading to highlight the different climate variables such as temperature, precipitation, and extreme climate events that affect crop pollination.
  3. Further, use the reading to discuss how climate change has affected quality and quantity of nectar and pollen, phenological events, and pollinator behavior, visitation rates, and distribution.
  4. Finally, discuss the economic implications of the effects of climate change on crop pollination and thereby, on global food security.

This can be accessed here.

As a high school Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching Formula Substitution in algebra after introducing formulas, numbers, variables, and constants.

Global warming due to fossil fuel emissions, is believed to be one of the causes for climate change. Therefore, there is an increased interest in the use of renewable and cleaner sources of energy. This lesson plan will help improve students’ literacy in clean energy sources while enabling them to practice Formula Substitution. It includes resources to teach your students about the components of formulas, and substitution in a formula using the energy equation for wind turbines, to enable them to understand the energy available from wind.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Curriculum Code (Australia):

  • ACMEM035: substitute numerical values into algebraic expressions
  • ACMEM036: substitute given values for the other pronumerals in a mathematical formula to find the value of the subject of the formula

Cross Curriculum Priority (Australia): Sustainability

Presumed Knowledge (Australia):

  • Arithmetic with real numbers and the use of index notation (ACMNA150, ACMNA153, ACMNA183, and ACMNA154).
  • Substitute values into formulae to determine an unknown (ACMNA234).
  • Use units of energy to the consumption of electricity (ACMEM031)
  • Convert from one unit of energy to another (ACMEM034)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Formulae and their components: Numbers, Variables, and Constants; Formula Substitution
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 min

This is a lesson plan developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub (MCCCRH) with contributions by Dr Sanaa Hobeichi and Dr Ian Macadam (CLEX); Tahnee Burgess and Dr David Holmes (MCCCRH); and Dr. Roger Dargaville (Monash University).

The lesson plan originated at the “Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers” workshop at the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (AMOS) conference held in February 2020 in Fremantle, Western Australia. The workshop was supported by AMOS, CLEX, MCCCRH, the Schools Weather and Air Quality (SWAQ) Citizen Science project, TROP ICSU and the University of Western Australia.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Contents of Lesson Plan

Teaching Module

(10 min)

A teaching module to introduce formulas, variables, numbers, constants, and substitution in formulas.

This can be accessed here.

Visualization (2.5 min) An interactive visualization of per capita CO2 emissions versus electricity from renewables (2014).

This can be accessed here.

Video

(2.5 min)

A video to introduce the topic of wind power.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom Activity

(~5 min + 30 min)

A PowerPoint presentation of a solved word problem to compute wind energy from a wind turbine (using Formula Substitution) followed by solving textbook questions for independent practice.

This is available as a separate downloadable document here..

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is wind energy? How can it be harnessed for electricity?
  2. How can you compute the energy available due to wind?
  3. What are the advantages and challenges of producing electricity from a wind turbine?

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Formulas’ by The Improving Mathematics Education in Schools (TIMES) Project, Australian Govt., to introduce or reacquaint your students with formulas and their components- variables, numbers, and constants.
  2. Encourage them to identify the variables, numbers and constants in a set of formulas (e.g.) given in the text.
  3. Ask them to recall examples of formulas they know and identify their elements.
  4. Use the solved examples in the text to explain the subject of the formula and how substitution in a formula is done to find its value.
  5. Explain what an equation is and how it can be solved by substitution using the given examples.

This can be accessed here.

Step 2: Initiate discussion

Use the interactive visualization, ‘CO2 emissions per capita vs. share of electricity from renewables, 2014’ by Our World in Data, to initiate a brief discussion about global warming due to carbon emissions and its effect on climate change. Allow the students to make various country selections on the interactive chart to visualize their contributions to these sectors. Thus, emphasize on the importance of renewable and clean sources of energy as opposed to fossil-fuel-based energy.

This can be accessed here.

Step 3: Introduce the topic of wind power

  1. Use the video, ‘Wind Power’ by Khan Academy to introduce your students to wind energy as a renewable and clean source of energy. Use this video to explain how wind energy is harnessed for electricity production using wind turbines.
  2. This can be accessed here.
  3. Explain to your students that in the ensuing classroom activity, the equation for measuring the wind energy will be used as an example for formula substitution to find the value of total energy harnessed by the wind turbine.

Step 4: Apply understanding

  1. Use the PowerPoint presentation, ‘A teaching exercise for renewable energy’ by Dr. Roger Dargaville, Monash University, to guide your students through a worked example of formula substitution.
  2. Use this exercise to show your students how the energy equation for the wind turbine can be used to find out the amount of wind power the turbine receives or is available for it to harness. The working out of the answers appears step-by-step on mouse clicks in the presentation.
  1. The PowerPoint presentation can be accessed as an independent downloadable in this lesson plan.
  1. Following the solved example, encourage your students to independently solve a selection of questions from their textbooks, based on students’ abilities and fluency in the topic.

As a high school Geography, Humanities or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about human-induced (anthropogenic) environmental changes that challenge sustainability and could be responsible for global climate change.

This lesson engages students in learning activities that enable them to understand how local actions can have global effects. They will see how their choices can impact the environment and climate change positively or negatively. Students will carry out an energy audit of their class/school for air conditioning or heating use. They will develop inquiry questions to learn about their school’s energy use. They can then suggest actions that individual classrooms, buildings, or the whole school can take to decrease energy use.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography, Humanities or Social Sciences.

 

Curriculum Code (Australia):

  • ACHGK070: Human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability
  • ACHGK071: Environmental world views of people and their implications for environmental management

Cross Curriculum Priority (Australia): Sustainability

  • Building capacities for thinking and acting in ways that are necessary to create a more sustainable future.
  • Promote reflective thinking processes in young people and empower them to design action that will lead to a more equitable and sustainable future.

Presumed Knowledge (Australia):

  • Students understand what emissions are, how they are produced, and how emissions impact climate change.
  • Students understand how to read a map.

 

This is a lesson plan developed by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub (MCCCRH) with contributions by Dr Sanaa Hobeichi and Dr Ian Macadam (CLEX); Tahnee Burgess and Dr David Holmes (MCCCRH); Caitlin Bell (John Forrest Secondary College); Dr Melissa Hart (the Schools Weather and Air Quality (SWAQ) Citizen Science project); Andrew Rollin (John Curtin College of the Arts); and Ashleigh Lustica (Fremantle College).

The lesson plan originated at the “Climate across the Curriculum: Educational Resources for Teachers” workshop at the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (AMOS) conference held in February 2020 in Fremantle, Western Australia. The workshop was supported by AMOS, CLEX, MCCCRH, SWAQ, TROP ICSU and the University of Western Australia. A version of the lesson plan tailored for use in Australian classrooms is available at https://www.monash.edu/mcccrh/projects/climate-classrooms.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Geography, Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Ecological Footprint, Energy Use,

Energy Audit, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
200 min (4 sessions)

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is your individual ecological footprint on Earth?
  2. What does your school’s energy audit look like?
  3. How do the carbon emissions of your country compare with others/rest of the world?
  4. What actions can be taken by you to reduce energy usage?

Contents of Lesson Plan

Simulation (10 min) A WWF Ecological Footprint calculator to calculate one’s ecological footprint from lifestyle choices. This tool allows students to see how many planets would be required to support the Earth’s population if everyone lived like them.

This can be accessed here.

Reading

(20 min)

An article from the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper on the impact of hot days on electricity supply in the context of increased frequency of such occurrences according to climate projections.

This can be accessed here.

Classroom Activity

(50 min)

A full lesson by Cool Australia including an audit document for students to record and audit their school’s energy use. It includes typical energy ratings for students to use in calculating energy consumption. Guidance is provided in the Teacher Worksheet.

Note: You will have to sign up for a Cool Australia Log In to access all teaching and student material.

This can be accessed here.

Visualization (5 min) An interactive map and graph of per capita annual emissions of carbon dioxide (CO₂) by Our World in Data, based on territorial emissions. The emissions data can be downloaded in a ‘.csv’ format.

This can be accessed here.

Simulation

(5 min)

An interactive electricity bill calculator for students to put in their energy usage and get suggestions on how to cut costs by using optimally or reducing energy use.

Note: This tool is specific to Australia. Teachers may use a region-specific tool for their lesson or use this for demonstration purposes.

This can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Pre-lesson Activity 

Before the first session, ask your students to calculate their ecological footprint using the WWF Australia ‘What is your Ecological Footprint?’ calculator at home. Direct them to note down their results of:

  1. How many planets do we need if everybody lives like you?
  2. When is your personal Overshoot Day?

This can be accessed here.

 

Session 1: Starter Task- Think, Pair, Share

Start the first session by posing a few questions to your students:

  1. What were your results in the WWF Ecological Footprint?
  2. What do you think are the main ways people use energy in their lives?
  3. In what ways do you think you could personally reduce your energy use?
  4. What would be the easiest ways to reduce vs. the most impactful?’

Use the reading, ‘The day from hell: why the grid melts down in hot weather’ by Michael Bachelard, Sydney Morning Herald (SMH), to prompt a discussion about people’s reliance on energy in their day-to-day lives and what it might feel like to have restrictions on energy use. Direct your students to read the article to understand the impacts of extremely hot days on the electricity system.

This can be accessed here.

Ask them how such hot days could impact their school day. Discuss ways of making better choices in daily energy use by identifying personal, industry, and government responsibilities.

 

Primer for Session 2:

Ask the students to brainstorm about all the ways energy is used in the school, focusing in on cooling and heating. Organize them in pairs or small groups and guide them to plan for an energy audit activity using the following pointers.

  1. Decide how you are going to find out about the school’s energy use in cooling and heating (e.g. observing and interviewing).
  2. Develop questions you might need to ask to find out what kind of AC/heating is used (e.g. split system, ducted), how long is it used, what temperature is it set at, when it is turned on/off (which outdoor temp?).
  3. Decide on-spot audit (proportion of rooms if in a large school) or complete audit if possible.

Consider who you may need to get information from (individual teachers, administration, caretakers) and how you will get this information from them.

 

Session 2: Group Activity

Distribute the Cool Australia School Energy Audit workbook to all groups of students. Alternatively, encourage students to focus on their own inquiry questions to guide their audit.

Note: You will have to sign up for a Cool Australia Log In to access all teaching and student material.

This can be accessed here.

  1. Direct your students to follow the guidelines in the Cool Australia School Energy Audit workbook. Alternatively, carry out your own audit plan following your inquiry questions.
  2. Allow the students to use class time to conduct their surveys/interviews.
  3. As an extension, ask them to identify any current good practices such as the use of solar panels, energy-efficient devices, reflective films on windows, behavioral norms common to the school.

 

Session 3: Extend Understanding

A) Begin by allowing students to explore Our World in Data’s interactive per capita emissions map, ‘CO2 emissions per capita, 2017’ and notice your country’s place in per capita’s emissions rankings (5 min).

This can be accessed here.

Use these reflection questions:

  1. What do you notice about the rankings?
  2. What is interesting or surprising to you?
  3. What can be done?

B) Invite groups to present the findings of their school energy audits (15 min).

Collate all findings and display them for analysis and discussion – on posters, on a gallery walk or on a shared online document projected for the whole class to see.

Think, pair, share:

  1. Analyze audit data, e.g. averages of temperature, the number of hours devices are used, behaviors around heating and cooling energy use.
  2. Identify the rooms/places in the school outside the average, both high and low. Discuss why this might be happening.
  3. Determine an appropriate temperature most conducive to learning (classroom vs gym vs lunchroom).
  4. Locate which rooms/places in the school are above (heating) or below this temperature (cooling) to target your action.
  5. Calculate the hours or energy saved by reducing energy use in specific areas Consider monetary savings by reducing energy use. Students can use the Synergy online simulator, ‘Reduce your bill’.

This can be accessed here.

C) Classroom Discussion (10 min):

Encourage the students to think critically about positive changes they recommend, and how best to communicate the energy audit findings.

  1. Ask them what specific and positive changes can they recommend around reducing the use of heating or cooling in our school? What broad suggestions will reduce energy use?
  2. Question them further about what they can personally do to decrease energy use with the information they have now gathered?

D) Further Action Plan (10 min):

Use the following pointers-

  1. Who needs to know about the proposed changes (e.g. Individual teachers, students, school administration)?
  2. How should you communicate these changes, so they are adopted by these different groups? (infographic, create a how-to video, presentations)?
  3. What information would you include to convince them that this is the best for your local and global community?
  4. How would you persuade them?

E) Reflection Questions on Action Plan (10 min):

  1. What are the possible advantages/disadvantages of your proposed action for the school to take?
  2. How have your feelings about our carbon emissions and impacts changed since completing this investigation?
  3. How do you feel now about your carbon emissions and the negative impacts it has?

F) Homework Assignment:

Ask your students to create a presentation that shows their proposed actions and details, giving reasons for choosing these actions and details of the advantages and disadvantages of implementing them.

 

Session 4: Group Presentation

Direct your students to present their action plan to the school in a format appropriate to their audience, inclusive of evidence and explanation as to why such changes are important. Emphasize how this reduced energy use will be beneficial in the larger context of anthropogenic or human-induced impacts on climate change.

Visualization: Show Your Stripes: Changes in Temperature

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory statistics and specifically linear regression.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach introductory statistics through linear regression assignments. The lesson plan includes a hands-on computer-based classroom activity to be conducted on datasets of Arctic Ice Data (1979-2017). This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of scatter plots, regression equations, correlation coefficients, regression lines, and linear regression with residual (outlier) plots.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Use an example to describe linear regression analysis.
  2. Is the extent of the Arctic Sea Ice decreasing since 1979?
  3. Has the monthly extent of Arctic Sea Ice changed from 1979- 2017?
  4. Discuss the Ice Albedo Feedback and Global Warming to explain the differences in extent of Arctic Sea Ice over the past four decades.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Scatter Plots, Correlation Coefficients, Regression Equations, Linear Regression, Residual (Outlier) Plots
Climate Topic Climate and the Cryosphere

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(25 -30 min)

A teaching module to explain the basics of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, and linear regression with residual (outlier) plots.

This can be accessed here:

For High School

For Undergraduate

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of linear regression using datasets of the extent of Arctic Sea Ice (1979-2017).

Go to the Activity

Visualization (5 min) An interactive visualization of changes in the extent of Arctic Sea Ice from 1979-2020

Go to the Resource

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

1 Topic introduction and discussion 1.         Use the teaching module, ‘Introduction-Linear Regression and Correlation’ by OpenStaxTM, Rice University (for High School level) or ‘Chapter-3: Linear Regression’ provided by Ramesh Sridharan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (for Undergraduate level), to introduce these topics of basic statistics.

2.         Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to the basics of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, and linear regression.

3.         Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

For High School

For Undergraduate

2 Develop the topic further
  1. Use the classroom activity, ‘Arctic Ice Data’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of linear regression with residual (outlier) plots using datasets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).
  2. This classroom activity includes datasets of the monthly extent of Arctic Sea Ice linked from NSIDC’s observations from 1979 to 2017. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet that you may use in your classroom to explain the mathematical functions and methods.
  3. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with dataset) and proceed with the classroom activity.
  4. Encourage your students to answer topical questions by applying their understanding of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, and linear regression.
  5. Use the regression analyses performed to initiate a discussion on the decrease in extent of Arctic Sea Ice due to the Ice Albedo Feedback and anthropogenically forced Global Warming (links to explanatory notes given within the tool).

Go to the Activity Arctic Ice Data

3 Extend understanding Use the visualization, ‘Charctic Interactive Sea Ice Graph’ from NSIDC to encourage discussion amongst your students about the changes in the extent of Arctic Sea Ice from the years 1979-2020. Discuss how these changes could be the result of changes in the Earth’s climate in recent times.

Go to the visualization, ‘Charctic Interactive Sea Ice Graph

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory calculus (integration) and specifically how to solve integration equations.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach integration using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes world petroleum consumption data from 1980 to 2016. This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of the relationship between a function and its integral and to set up and solve equations with an integral to describe the trend of world petroleum consumption over time. Carbon emissions from fossil fuels such as petroleum have contributed towards global warming since the beginning of the industrial age. This lesson plan also includes a classroom resource to enable your students to understand about oil production projections such as the Hubbert’s Peak Theory and the global Carbon Budget to stay within a 2-degree Celsius warming scenario, as per the UN’s Paris Agreement.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the relationship between a function and its integral?
  1. How has the world petroleum consumption changed since 1980?
  1. How does the Hubbert’s peak prediction and actual oil production in the US since 1980 differ?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Setting up and solving integration equations, Relation between a function and its integral
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global, USA
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(20 min)

A teaching module to explain integration and the relation between a function and its integral.

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of integration related problems by setting up and solving for integration equations using a dataset of the World’s Petroleum Consumption over time (1980-2016).

Go to the Activity

Teaching Module

(20 min)

A teaching module that discusses global fossil fuel reserves and the Carbon Budget for a 2-degree world. It includes a visualization and downloadable dataset to use as an additional classroom resource about the US oil production over time (1910-2016) and the Hubbert’s Peak prediction about US oil reserves.

Go to the Resource

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

    1. Use the teaching module, ‘Integration- Introduction’ by OpenStax, Rice University, to teach about integration and its applications.
    2. Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to explain the relation between a function and its integral.
    3. Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

    Go to the Resource

Step2 : Extend understanding

  1. Use the classroom activity, ‘World Petroleum Consumption’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of integration using a dataset from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA).
  2. This classroom activity includes a dataset of the World’s Petroleum Consumption from 1980 to 2016. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.
  3. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.
  4. It further includes questions that you may wish to use in your classroom to explain integration to initiate a discussion on the global oil consumption in recent times.
  5. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with datasets) and the Word document (with directions to use the dataset and a set of questions to analyze the dataset).
  6. Proceed with the classroom activity and encourage your students to answer the questions by applying their understanding of integration and setting up and solving equations with integrals.
  7. Discuss how this global petroleum consumption is responsible for carbon emissions that have contributed towards post-industrial age global warming.

Go to the Activity

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the visualizations and associated reading, ‘How long before we run out of fossil fuels’ by Hannah Ritchie, Our World in Data, to discuss the global fossil fuel reserves and the carbon budget for a 2-degree world.
  2. Begin by discussing the Hubbert’s Peak Theory that predicts that the United States will run out of its oil reserves in the decades following year 2000.
  3. Then use the chart of actual US oil production over time (1910-2016) and discuss why it deviates from the Hubbert’s Peak prediction.
  4. Discuss why this is significant in the context of carbon emissions and their effect on global warming. The data for the chart is available to download as a CSV file, if you wish to perform further mathematical problems based on it.
  5. Finally, use the other visualizations to discuss the global fossil fuel reserves and the target carbon budget to ensure that global warming is kept within the 2-degree warming scenario (by reducing fossil fuel based carbon emissions), as per the UN’s Paris Agreement.

Go to the Resource

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory differential calculus; specifically, about differentiating logistic and exponential functions and the use of the Quotient (or Product) Rule.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach differentiating functions- logistic and exponential, using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes data of photovoltaic (solar) energy production of several countries from 1990 to 2016. In the context of global warming due to carbon emissions from fossil fuel, harnessing a clean renewable source of energy like solar power is increasing across the globe and can be a potential solution in reducing our greenhouse gas emissions.

This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of logistic and exponential functions and apply the Quotient (or Product) Rule to describe the rates of increase of photovoltaic energy production over time in countries such as Germany, Italy, USA, and the World. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are differentiating functions?
  2. Distinguish between logarithmic, exponential, and logistic differentiating functions.
  3. How has the rate of global solar energy production changed since 1990?
  4. How do the rates of solar energy production in select countries (from the given datasets) differ from that of the World?
  5. Define a function for the rate of increase of the World’s solar energy production to meet its entire energy requirement.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Logarithmic, Exponential, Logistic Differentiating Functions,

Quotient or Product Rule

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to explain differentiating functions, their subtypes- logarithmic, exponential, and logistic functions, and the use of the Quotient or Product Rule.

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of differentiating functions using datasets of various countries’ solar (photovoltaic) energy production over time (1990-2016).

Go to the Activity

Visualizations

(10 min)

A set of interactive visualizations using similar datasets to better understand the distribution of and changes in wind energy production across the globe in recent times.

These can be accessed at:

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

    1. Use the teaching module, ‘Exponential and Logarithmic Functions’ by University of Nebraska-Lincoln, to introduce the concept of differentiating functions.
    2. Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to explain logarithmic, exponential, and logistic functions and the application of the Quotient or Power Rule.
    3. Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

    Go to the Resource

Step2 : Extend understanding

  1. Use the classroom activity, ‘Country Photovoltaic Energy Production (and more)’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of differentiating functions using datasets from the International Energy Agency (IEA).
  2. This classroom activity includes datasets of several countries’ photovoltaic energy production (including the World’s cumulative data) from 1990 to 2016. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.
  3. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.
  4. It further includes questions that you may wish to use in your classroom to explain differentiating functions to initiate a discussion on the rate of increase in global solar energy production in several countries such as Germany, Italy, and USA in recent times.
  5. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with datasets) and the Word document (with directions to use the datasets and a set of questions to analyze the datasets).
  6. The documents also include datasets of several other countries that may be used for this activity.
  7. Proceed with the classroom activity and encourage your students to answer the questions by applying their understanding of logistic and exponential differentiating functions and the Quotient (or Power) Rule.
  8. This activity also includes links to readings to help explain to your students the importance of solar energy production to meet the world’s energy requirements and discuss why this mode of energy production has been slow to increase across the world.

Go to the Activity

Step 3: Discuss further

Use the visualizations, ‘Solar Power Plants by Capacity (MW)’ by World Resources Institute (WRI) and ‘Solar energy generation, 2018’ by Our World in Data to discuss about the current capacity and distribution, and increase in capacity of global solar energy production for the years 1965-2018. Finally, discuss how the increase in the World’s solar energy production could help reduce carbon emissions and mitigate global warming.

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

 

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory differential calculus and specifically about polynomial and logistic differentiation and the use of the Quotient (or Product) Rule.

The derivative at different points of a differentiable function (Image: Wikipedia)

This lesson plan will allow you to teach polynomial and logistic differentiation using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes wind energy production data of several countries from 1980 to 2016. In the context of global warming due to carbon emissions from fossil fuel, harnessing a clean renewable source of energy like wind power is increasing across the globe and can provide a potential solution to reducing our greenhouse gas emissions.

This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of polynomial and logistic differentiation and apply the Quotient (or Product) Rule to describe the rates of increase of wind energy production over time in countries such as China, Spain, USA, and the World.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are differentiating functions?
  1. Describe polynomial and logistic differentiation using examples.
  1. How has the rate of global wind energy production changed since 1980?
  1. How do the rates of wind energy production in select countries (from the given datasets) differ from that of the World?
  1. Define a function for the rate of increase of the World’s wind energy production to meet its entire energy requirement.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Polynomial and Logistic Differentiation

Quotient or Product Rule

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to explain differentiating functions, polynomial and logistic differentiation, differentiation rules and the use of the Quotient or Product Rule.

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of polynomial and logistic differentiation using datasets of various countries’ wind energy production over time (1980-2016).

Go to the Activity

Visualizations

(10 min)

A set of interactive visualizations using similar datasets to better understand the distribution of and changes in wind energy production across the globe in recent times.

These can be accessed at:

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Differentiation Rules’ by OpenStax, Rice University, to teach differentiating functions, differentiation rules, and polynomial or logistic differentiation.
  2. Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to explain the types of differentiating functions and the application of the Quotient or Power Rule.
  3. Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

Go to the Resource

Step2 : Extend understanding

  1. Use the classroom activity, ‘Wind Energy by Selected Countries and World’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of polynomial or logistic differentiation using datasets from the International Energy Agency (IEA).
  2. This classroom activity includes datasets of several countries’ wind energy production (including the World’s cumulative data) from 1980 to 2016. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.
  3. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.
  4. It further includes questions that you may wish to use in your classroom to explain differentiating functions to initiate a discussion on the rate of increase in global wind energy production in several countries such as China, Spain, and USA in recent times.
  5. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with datasets) and the Word document (with directions to use the datasets and a set of questions to analyze the datasets).
  6. The documents also include datasets of several other countries that may be used for this activity.
  7. Proceed with the classroom activity and encourage your students to answer the questions by applying their understanding of differentiating functions and the Quotient (or Power) Rule.
  8. This activity also includes links to readings to help explain to your students the basics of wind energy production and its environmental impacts.

Go to the Resource

Step 3: Discuss further

Use the visualizations, ‘Wind Power Plants by Capacity (MW)’ by World Resources Institute (WRI) and ‘Wind energy generation, 2018’ by Our World in Data to discuss about the current capacity and distribution, and increase in capacity of global wind energy production for the years 1965-2018. Finally, discuss how the increase in the World’s wind energy production could help reduce carbon emissions and mitigate global warming.

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

 

Reading: The climate in our hands – Ocean and Cryosphere

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory differential calculus and specifically the application of derivatives.

(top) Sea ice concentration (light blue to white) on September 18, 2019, the day of the summer minimum extent. The gold line is the median extent for 1981-2010: half of years had smaller extents, half had larger. (bottom) A graph of daily ice extent each year of the satellite record. Earlier years are in shades of light blue; recent years are in dark blue. The 2019 daily extent line is in dark pink. NOAA Climate.gov image, based on data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach introductory derivatives, polynomial differentiation, and the application of derivatives. The lesson plan includes a hands-on computer-based classroom activity to be conducted on datasets of Arctic Ice Data (1980-2017). This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of sixth degree polynomial differentiation, maxima/minima values, finding roots and inflection points.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are derivatives and their functions?
  1. Using an example, describe polynomial differentiation.
  1. Is the extent of the Arctic Sea Ice decreasing since 1980?
  1. Has the speed of melting of Arctic Sea Ice changed from 1980- 2017?
  1. Discuss the Ice Albedo Feedback and Global Warming to explain the differences in rates of melting of and extent of Arctic Sea Ice over the past four decades.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Derivatives, Polynomial Differentiation

Function Graph, Extrema, Concavity, Roots

Inflection Points

Climate Topic Climate and the Cryosphere

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-70 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to explain the basics of derivatives, derivative rules, and differentiation.

Go to the Resource

Teaching Module

(20 min)

A teaching module to explain the application of derivatives in comparing rates in differentiation and aspects of the function graph.

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of differential rates using datasets of Arctic Sea Ice Data (1980-2017).

Go to the Activity

Pre-activity Reading

Visualization

(5 min)

An interactive visualization of changes in the extent of Arctic Sea Ice from 1979-2020.

Go to the Visualization

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Differentiation: definition and basic derivative rules’ by Khan Academy, to introduce the concept of derivatives and differentiation.
  2. Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to explain derivative rules, the power rule, and how to differentiate polynomials.
  3. Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

Go to the Resource

Step 2: Develop the topic further

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Derivatives and the shape of a graph’ by OpenStaxTM, Rice University, to explain to your students how related rates can be compared using derivatives.
  2. Use the sub-sections within the tool to explain various mathematical concepts for determining maxima/minima values, roots, and inflection points in the derivative function graph.

Go to the Resource

Step 3: Extend understanding

  1. Use the reading, ‘Polynomials and their Derivatives: Polynomials, Critical Points, and Inflection Points’ by Donald Byrd, Indiana University Informatics to reiterate the mathematical concepts to be applied in the ensuing activity.
  2. Use the classroom activity, ‘Arctic Sea Ice’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of derivatives, polynomial differentiation and application of derivatives using datasets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).
  3. This classroom activity includes three datasets of the extent of Arctic Sea Ice linked from NSIDC’s observations from 1980 to 2017.
  4. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.
  5. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.
  6. It further includes questions that you may wish to use in your classroom to explain mathematical functions and methods and to initiate a discussion on the decrease in extent of Arctic Sea Ice due to the Ice Albedo Feedback and anthropogenically forced Global Warming (links to explanatory notes given within the tool).
  7. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with dataset) and the Word document (with directions to use the dataset and a set of questions to analyze the dataset).
  8. Proceed with the classroom activity and encourage your students to answer the questions by applying their understanding of function graph, maxima/minima, roots, and inflection points.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 4: Discuss further

Use the visualization, ‘Charctic Interactive Sea Ice Graph’ from NSIDC to encourage discussion amongst your students about the changes in the extent of Arctic Sea Ice from the years 1979-2020. Discuss how these changes could be the result of changes in the Earth’s climate in recent times.

These can be accessed at:

Visualization

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), their genetic make-up and application in agriculture and industry.

This lesson plan will explain what GMOs are, describe how they are constructed and will introduce the question of whether GM crops could be one possible mechanism to address food and livelihood security in the face of global climate change.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

This is a teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Sneha Bhogale, Pune, India. Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

More Teacher-contributed Lesson Plans

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)? How are they used in agriculture and industry?
  2. What is the difference between GMOs and gene edited organisms?
  3. Describe how GMO crops are created.
  4. Are GMO crops one possible solution to food and livelihood security in the wake of changing climatic conditions?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

Genetic Engineering, Gene Editing, GMO Crops

Climate Topic(s) Climate Adaptation and Mitigation

Climate and the Biosphere

Climate and the Anthroposphere

Location Global, Africa
Language(s) English
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
70-90 min

Contents

A set of videos

(8-10 min each) and associated readings (5-7 min each)

A set of video interviews of plant scientists to introduce what GMOs are, explain how genetic engineering techniques are used to introduce/regulate desired traits or remove/ regulate undesirable factors in organisms, and the application of GMOs across different fields like agriculture and the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore various topics using separate tabs to discuss whether GMOs affect human health, plant and insect ecosystems, and how are they regulated.

Link here

Video (~10 min) A video that describes how GMO plants are created by genetic engineering techniques.

Link here

Reading (10 min) A reading that explains how GMO seeds could help African farmers deal with the adverse effects of climate change on crops.

Link here

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use a set of videos and associated readings, ‘The Science of GMOs’ by Purdue University, to introduce the topic of GMOs to your students
  2. Navigate through the tabs at the bottom of the webpage to explain various topics concerning GMOs, as listed below:
    1. What are GMOs?
    2. Why do we use GMOs?
    3. Do GMOs harm health?
    4. How do GMOs affect insects?
    5. How does the regulation process work?
    6. What about GMOs and weeds?
    7. What’s the story on GMOs and labeling?
    8. What is gene editing?Use each section to enable discussions regarding the different aspects of the creation and usage of GMOs in agriculture and industry.

3. Finally, discuss the difference between genetically modified crops and gene edited crops.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Use the video, ‘How to Make a Genetically Modified Plant’ by the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, to explain how genetic engineering techniques are used to modify the genetic material in plants to introduce, remove or regulate certain traits.
  2. Discuss, using the examples given in the video, the rationale for modifying certain traits in these plants.
  3. Describe, using the video, the molecular components (gene of interest, plasmid, promoter sequence, origin of replication (ORI), regulatory sequences, antibiotic selection gene), techniques (gene-transfer, plasmid selection), and strategies employed to create GM crops.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the reading, ‘African farmers want GMO seeds to help weather climate change’ by John Agaba, Alliance for Science, Cornell University, to explain to your students how GM crops could possibly bolster food security in several Sub-Saharan African countries that are dealing with failed crops due to climate change.
  2. Use the text to emphasize to your students how the GM seeds could be the solution to growing crops that are more resilient in changing climatic conditions.
  3. Discuss the various case studies mentioned in the text to explain to your students the different approaches adopted by several African countries to improve their crop yield and crop resilience.

Reading here

Credits

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds:

Gamil Gamal, PhD

Lecturer of Meteorology,

Natural Resources Department,

Faculty of African Postgraduate Studies,

Cairo University, Egypt

 

As a high school or introductory undergraduate Chemistry, Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of tools to teach about the water cycle- its components, the distribution of natural water resources on Earth and the impact of climate change on it.

This lesson plan allows students to learn about the different stages of the water cycle and the factors that influence it. It includes resources that teach students about the different components of the water cycle in detail and how they can be affected by climate change. This lesson plan also enables students to learn about the distribution of water resources under a natural water cycle, how it could be altered due to anthropogenic practices, and what measures could be adopted for a sustainable future.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry, Geography or Earth Sciences.

Lesson plan contributed by Dr Akanksha Gupta (Sri Venkateswara College) and Dr Vinod Kumar (Kirori Mal College), Delhi, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Teacher-Contributed Lesson Plans

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the Earth’s natural water cycle? Describe its components.
  2. Explain how the water cycle determines the distribution of the natural water resources on Earth.
  3. How could human activities affect the Earth’s natural water cycle?
  4. How does the water cycle affect Earth’s climate and vice versa?
  5. What are the effects of global climate change on Earth’s natural water cycle?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry, Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Chemistry, Water Cycle

Biogeochemical Cycles, Hydrologic Cycle

Condensation, Evaporation, Evapotranspiration

Groundwater, Precipitation, Sublimation

Climate Topic Climate and the Hydrosphere

Climate and the Atmosphere

Location Global
Language(s) English, one resource available in several languages
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-90 min

Contents

Video

(~8 min)

A video that introduces the natural water cycle on Earth and briefly describes the processes involved in it.

Go to the Resource

Reading (45 min) A reading that describes the different components of the water cycle in detail. It also includes downloadable diagrams of the water cycle with a brief summary of the water cycle in several languages.

Go to the Reading

Reading (~15 min) A reading that explains how climate change affects the water cycle on Earth.

Go to the Reading

Optional: Teaching Module (~50 min) An optional comprehensive teaching module that discusses the distribution of water on Earth under a natural water cycle and how this can be affected by anthropogenic activities.

Go to the Resource

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the video, ‘Water Cycle’ by Khan Academy to introduce your students to the processes involved in the water cycle on Earth.
  2. Describe how the water changes through gas-liquid phases and how each phase impacts life on Earth.
  3. Finally, discuss how the water cycle results in the distribution of saltwater and freshwater resources on Earth.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Extend understanding

  1. Use the webpage, ‘The Water Cycle for Adults and Advanced Students’, by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) Water Science School, to explore various aspects of the natural water cycle in detail.
  2. Use the tabs in the ‘Overview’ section to explain the different components of the water cycle such as condensation, precipitation, and evaporation.
  3. Stress on the importance of each component in maintaining the equilibrium of the natural water cycle and on the distribution of natural water resources on Earth.
  4. Direct your students to download the water cycle diagram for a visual representation of the natural water cycle.
  5. If required, use the interactive water cycle diagram in the multimedia section to enable better understanding of the topic.
  6. Note: The water cycle diagram and a summary text are available in over 60 different languages.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Discuss further

  1. Use the reading, ‘The Water Cycle and Climate Change’ by UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) Center for Science Education to explain the effects of climate change on the natural water cycle on Earth.
  2. Discuss using the text, how processes such as evaporation, precipitation, and cloud formation are affected by climate change.
  3. Further explain how these changes in turn could exacerbate global warming, leading to increased changes in the Earth’s climate.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 4 (Optional) : Teaching Module on the Water Cycle and Freshwater Resources

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Unit 2: The Hydrologic Cycle and Freshwater Resources’ by SERC (The Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College) to discuss the different components of the water cycle, the distribution of Earth’s water resources and the possible effects of anthropogenic activities on the quality and availability of water.
  2. Use the teaching notes to enable discussions on how human beings could optimize the use of water resources to facilitate environmental justice globally and adopt sustainable practices in keeping with Earth’s natural water cycle.
  3. The teaching module has several downloadable documents such as pre-class activity sheet, assessment rubric, instructors’ notes, and lecture notes. The entire teaching module is also available to be downloaded for offline use.

Go to the Resource

As an Undergraduate Humanities (Cultural Studies; Literature; History) teacher, you can use this lesson plan as part of a course in Environmental Geography, Environmental History, General Criticism and Critical Theory.

The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’, by Ghosh can be used to acquaint students with Environmental History of the planet and in India in particular. This work along with the debates generated by Dipesh Chakrabarty’s 2009 essay, ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’ can be used as texts to better situate the topic of climate change in the humanities classroom. In this lesson plan students will review Ghosh’s book based on the theme of climate change in India. It includes writings on the stories, history and politics related to one of the most critical issues of our times.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Humanities. This is a teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

More Teacher-contributed Lesson Plans

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss why climate change has not caught the collective imagination of writers?
  2. Explain what Amitav Ghosh refers to as ‘The Great Derangement’ in the book.
  3. ‘The Anthropocene presents a challenge not only to the arts and humanities, but also to our commonsense understandings and beyond that to contemporary culture in general’- How does Amitav Ghosh justify this statement in the book?
  4. What might a sustainable world look like? Respond to this question with reference to Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Humanities (Cultural Studies, Literature, History)
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Geography, Environmental History

General Criticism, Critical Theory, Literary Analysis

Climate Literature, Non-fiction, Fiction- Speculative

Realism, Epic, Documentary, Narrative, Storytelling, Historicization

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global, India
Language(s) English
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
1-2 sessions of 45 min

Contents

Reading

(7 min)

An article by author Amitav Ghosh about the absence of climate change in contemporary literary fiction.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~5 min)

A brief write-up about the novel, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’ from the author’s website.

Go to the Reading

Note: The book will have to be procured for the purpose of this literary analysis.

Video

(25 min)

A discussion about the aforesaid novel to encapsulate points for discourse in the literary analysis of the book.

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Use the article in The Guardian by author Amitav Ghosh, ‘Amitav Ghosh: where is the fiction about climate change?’ to discuss his views on the evolution of the narrative in novels and why it has been resistant to include the topic of climate change. Use the text to explain how climate fiction (Cli-Fi) differs from science fiction (Sci-Fi) in the treatment of the narrative. Explain how fiction derived from climate change deviates from trends of ‘gradualism’ in contemporary narratives and yet does not belong to ‘surrealism’ and ‘magic realism’ due to its nature of being ‘real’. Thus, use the reading to emphasize the difficulty of writing about the nature of climate change and why it does not yet have a large presence in fictional works of the literary world.

This can be accessed here.

 

Step 2: Introduce the novel using the author’s note

Use the write-up on author Amitav Ghosh’s website as an introduction to his non-fiction book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’. Begin by discussing the title of the book- what is the ‘great derangement’ and why is climate change ‘unthinkable’ according to Ghosh. Use the brief text to introduce the different sections of this non-fiction book- literature, history and politics.

This can be accessed here.

Finally, ask your students to read the non-fiction book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’ as a home assignment. Note that the book will have to be procured for this assignment. Instruct them to makes notes of the key points and arguments presented whilst reading the book.

 

Step 3:  Summarize the key-points and arguments presented in the book

Play the video, “A Conversation on Amitav Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’” by Dr Maya Dodd (Literary and Cultural Studies) with Paloma Chandrachud (Environmental Studies), FLAME University, India, that highlights the key points presented by the author Amitav Ghosh in the book.

This can be accessed here.

Use the following points raised in the conversation to facilitate classroom discussions for better understanding of the reviewed material:

  • Why, according to Ghosh, is climate change unimaginable or unthinkable?
  • Why can we not narrate the story of our times (in the context of climate change)?
  • Why is the current cli-fi primarily speculative and not in the mode of realism?
  • Explain why Ghosh believes that the missing narrative of climate change requires the unmasking of ‘unbelievable choices’ we have made in the past. Use the case of a high-risk area Bombay/Mumbai as an example.
  • Describe some ‘unbelievable choices’ made by us that have become the new normal.
  • Discuss how the rift in narrative between the human and the non-human has come about. Explain how this differs from older narratives especially in the context of Asian/Indian literature.
  • Explain how Eastern philosophy of the ‘sacred’ or the ‘divine’ bridges the gap between humans and non-humans.
  • Historically, discuss how the association of nature and culture has evolved.
  • Explain how Western individualism as opposed to non-Western collective values affects climate action.
  • Discuss the role of denialists and activists in influencing climate consciousness.
  • Explain why a more philosophical approach with the contextualization of history is needed to deal with global climate change where a technical fix like adhering to the Paris Agreement is not enough.
  • Debate the argument that Asia’s ‘delayed start’ abrogates its responsibility of reducing carbon emissions or sharing the burden of climate mitigation.
  • Discuss how ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’ by Amitav Ghosh can be considered as the fourth book to the Ibis trilogy by the same author.

 

உலகெங்குமுள்ள கல்வித்திட்டங்களில் காலநிலைமாற்றம் மாற்றம் குறித்த பாடம்

  • நாம் வாழும் இந்தக் காலத்தில் காலநிலை மாற்றமானது முக்கிய சிக்கலாகும்.
  • உலகின் பல நாடுகள் மற்றும் அவற்றின் குடிமக்களின் நிலையான வளர்ச்சியினை இது பாதிக்கின்றது.
  • இதற்கு தீர்வு காண வேண்டுமேயானால் இச்சிக்கலின் தாக்கம் குறித்தக் கூறுகளை மக்கள் உணர்ந்திருத்தல் அவசியமாகும்.
  • காலநிலை மாற்றத்தின் விளைவுகளை குறைக்கும் முயற்சிகள், உலகளாவிய அறிவியலை மையமாக வைத்து உள்ளூர்களில் வேறூன்றும் தீர்வுகளாகவே இருக்க வேண்டும்.
  • காலநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த கல்வியினை முறைசார் கல்வியின் கட்டமைப்புடன் இணைப்பதன் மூலம் தற்போதைய மற்றும் எதிர்கால தலைமுறையினரை பருவநிலை மாற்றத்திற்கு எதிரான உள்ளூர் தீர்வுகளை கண்டறியும்  திறன்களில் ஆயத்தப்படுத்தக்கூடும். இவை பருவநிலை மாற்றத்திற்கேற்ப தங்களை தகவமைத்துக்கொண்டு, விளைவுகளை மட்டுப்படுத்தி, அதன் தாக்கத்திலிருந்து மீள உதவும் தீர்வுகளாக இருக்கக்கூடும்.

TROP ICSU (“Trans-disciplinary Research Oriented Pedagogy for Improving Climate Studies and Understanding”) என்பது பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த புரிதல் மற்றும் கல்வியினை மேம்படுத்தும் ஒரு ஒழுங்குசார்ந்த  ஆற்றுப்படுத்தும் கல்வியியல் திட்டம் ஆகும் ((https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org/)). பருவநிலை மாற்றம் தொடர்புடைய தலைப்புகளை பள்ளி மற்றும் கல்லூரிகளில்  மையக் கல்வித்திட்டங்களில் இணைத்து, மாணவர்களிடையே பருவநிலை மாற்றத்தின் காரணங்கள் மற்றும் விளைவுகள் குறித்த விழிப்புணர்வை அதிகரிப்தே இத்திட்டத்தின் பிரதான நோக்கமாகும். பருவநிலை மாற்றம் சார்ந்த சிக்கல்களை எதிர்கொள்ளும் குறிக்கோளுடன், மனித இனம் முழுவதும் இணைந்து செயல்பட உதவும் ரீதியில் பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த அறிவை மக்களாட்சிமயமாக்கும் பார்வையின் ஒரு அங்கமான திட்டமே TROP ICSU.  

சரியான மற்றும் வரையறுக்கப்பட்ட கல்வித்துறுப்புகளைக் கொண்டு பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த தலைப்புகளை முறைசார் கல்வி கட்டமைப்பின் மையக் கல்வித்திட்டத்தில் இணைக்ககூடிய ஒரு நம்பகத்தன்மையுடனான மூலத்தை வழங்குவதிலேயே இத்திட்டம் பிரதான கவனம் செலுத்துக்கிறது. இந்த அணுகுமுறை மூலம் அனைத்து மாணவர்களும் அவர்களின் மையத்துறைகளை கடந்து பருவநிலை மாற்றத்திற்கான காரணிகள் மற்றும் விளைவுகள் குறித்து விழிப்புணர்வுடன் இருக்க முடியும். மேலும், இதனால் அவர்கள் இந்த உலகளாவிய சிக்கலிற்கு பல புதுமையான உள்ளூர் தீர்வுகளைக் கண்டறியும் திறன்களை வளர்த்துக்கொள்ளக் கூடும்.

 

எனவே TROP ICSU ஐக்கிய நாடுகளின் நிலைத்த மேம்பாட்டு வளர்ச்சி குறிக்கோள்களில் (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)) நான்காவதான 'தரமான கல்வி' மற்றும் பதிமூன்றாவதான  'பருவநிலை செயல்பாடு' ஆகியவற்றின் கீழ் நேரடியாக சேர்ந்துள்ளது.

இத்திட்டத்தின் குறிக்கோள்களை அடையும் பொருட்டு பூனேவிலுள்ள இந்திய அறிவியல், கல்வி மற்றும் ஆராய்ச்சி நிறுவனத்தில் (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune) அமைந்துள்ள TROP ICSU திட்ட அமலாக்கக் குழு, உலகெங்கிலுமிருந்து சேகரிக்கப்பட்ட கற்பிக்க உதவும் வளங்களை திரட்டி, ஒன்றினைத்து, வரிசைப்படுத்தி, சரிப்பார்த்து ஒரு  களஞ்சியத்தை உருவாக்கியுள்ளது. இதைக்கொண்டு ஆசிரியர்கள் துறைக்கேற்ற எடுத்துக்காட்டுகள், நேர்வாய்வுகள் மற்றும் நடவடிக்கைகளின் உதவியோடு ஒவ்வொரு துறைக்கேற்ப பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த தலைப்புகளை பயிற்றுவிக்கக்கூடும். இதன்மூலம் ஏற்கனவே உள்ள கல்வித்திட்டத்துடன் பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த கல்வியினை இணைக்கும் ஒரு புதுமையான கல்வியியல் அணுகுமுறையினை இத்திட்டம் பறைசாற்றியுள்ளது. இத்திட்டத்தின் ஒரு அங்கமாக இந்தக்குழு பெரும் எண்ணிக்கையிலான (சில விவரமான படிப்பினைத் திட்டங்களுடனான)  ஒரு பயிற்றுவிக்கும் வளமூலத்தை உருவாக்கி பருவநிலை மாற்ற தலைப்புகளை மையக்கல்வித்திட்டதுடன் இணைப்பது சாத்தியமே என நிரூபித்துள்ளது. பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்து தலைப்புகளை வழக்கமான கல்வித் தலைப்புகளுடன் இணைக்கவும் அத்தலைப்புகளின் அறிவியல் ஏற்புடைமையை சரிபார்கவும் விவரமானதொரு முறைமை இங்கே பயன்படுத்தப்பட்டுள்ளது. எனவே TROP ICSU தரவுகளை பயன்படுத்தினால் ஆசிரியர்கள் தங்கள் கற்பிக்கும் திறனின் தரத்தை உயர்த்திக்கொள்வதோடு மாணவர்களிடையே பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த விழிப்புணர்வை பிரதான பாடத்திட்டத்திலிருந்து வழுவாமலேயே ஏற்படுத்த முடியும்.  

 

திட்டத்தின் முதல் கட்டத்தில், இந்தியா, பூட்டான், தென் ஆப்பிரிக்கா, உகாண்டா, எகிப்து, பிரான்ஸ், ஆஸ்திரி, இங்கிலாந்து, சீனா மற்றும் ஆஸ்திரேலியாவிலுள்ள ஆசிரியர்கள் மற்றும் பயிற்றுநர்களிற்கு பயிலரங்குகளை இத்திட்டக்குழு நடத்தியுள்ளது. இப்பயிலரங்குகளில், இக்கல்வித்தரவுகளை உள்ளூர் பயிற்றுநர்கள் மதிப்பிட்டுள்ளனர். சில இடங்களில் பருவநிலை மாற்ற நிபுணர்களும் இப்பயிலரங்குகளில் கலந்துகொண்டு தங்கள் கருத்துக்களைத் தெரிவித்துள்ளனர். யு.என்.சி.சி: லேர்ன(UNCC: Learn,), உலக காலநிலை அமைப்பு ( World Meteorological Organization (WMO)) மற்றும் உலக பருவநிலை ஆய்வுத் திட்டம் (World Climate Research Programme (WCRP)) போன்ற ஐக்கிய நாடுகள் சபையின் பல அமைப்புகளுடன் வலுவான இணைவாக்கம் இருப்பதால், இந்த அமைப்புகள் படிப்பினைத் திட்டங்கள் மற்றும் கற்பிக்கும் கருவிகளை சரிபார்பதோடு மட்டும் நில்லாமல்  இந்த முழு திட்டத்தையுமே ஆதரித்துள்ளன. ஐக்கிய நாடுகள் சபையின் தலைமை பணியிடம் அமைந்துள்ள நியு யார்கில் 2019 ஆம் ஆண்டு மே 14-15 தேதிகளில் நிகழ்ந்த UN STI Forum 2019 எனும் ஐக்கிய நாடுகளின் அறிவியல் கல்வி கூட்டத்திலும், ஜூலை 11 2019இல் மீண்டும் ஐக்கிய நாடுகள் சபையின் தலைமை பணியிடத்தில் நிகழ்ந்த வளம்குன்றா வளர்ச்சிக்கான பெருநிலை அரசியல் மன்றம் 2019 (High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019)) எனும் கூட்டத்தில் “பருநிலை மாற்றம் மற்றும் சுற்றுச்சூழல் குறித்த தரமான கல்வியை நோக்கிய அணுகுமுறைகள் மற்றும்  வழக்கங்கள்” ("Practices and Approaches onquality education towards environment and climate action) எனும் அமர்விலும் இத்திட்டக்குழு அவர்களின் கல்வியியல் முயற்சிகளை விவாதிக்கும் வாய்ப்பை பெற்றுள்ளனர். மேலும் போலாந்தில் நடைபெற்ற COP 24 மாநாடு மற்றும் பல பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த கலந்தாய்வுகள், ஆசிரியர்கள்/ பயிற்றுநர்களுக்கான பயிலரங்குகளில் இத்திட்டக்குழுவினர் கலந்துகொண்டுள்ளனர்.

 

பருவநிலை மாற்றம் குறித்த அக்கறை பலரிடையே குறிப்பாக இளைஞர்களிடையே உலகெங்கும் அதிகரித்துவரும் இச்சூழலில், இத்தாலி போன்ற பல நாடுகள் வெளிப்படையாக பருவநிலை மாற்றம் அனைத்துக் குழந்தையின் கல்வித்திட்டத்திலும் இருக்க வேண்டும் என குரலெழுப்பும் இந்த நிலையில் TROP ICSU சரியான நேரத்தில் துவக்கப்பட்ட ஒரு முன்னெடுப்பாகவே திகழ்கிறது.

TROP ICSU திட்டத்தின் முதல் கட்டம் (2017-2019) சர்வதேச அறிவியல் மன்றத்தின் (International Science Council (ISC)) மூவாண்டு நிதிநல்கையினால் ஆதரிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. 

 

 

Credits

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds, Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by Gubbi Labs, India

 

जगभरातील सर्व अभ्यासक्रमांत वातावरण-बदल शिक्षणाचा समावेश

  • वातावरण बदल आजच्या काळातील अत्यंत महत्त्वाच्या प्रश्न आहे
  • वातावरण बदल जगातील सर्व देशांच्या व तेथील नागरिकांच्या समन्यायी व धारणीय विकासास बाधक ठरत आहे
  • ह्यावर उपाय करण्यासाठी जनतेमधे ह्या बद्दलची जागरुकता असणे आवश्यक आहे
  • वातावरण बदलांमुळे होणाऱ्या दुष्परिणामांपासून बचाव करण्यासाठी उपाय स्थानिक असतील पण सार्वत्रिक विज्ञानावर आधारित असतील
  • वातावरण बदल शिक्षणाचा औपचारिक शिक्षणात समावेश केल्यामुळे सध्याच्या व भावी पिढ्यांमध्ये, वातावरण बदलांना सामोरे जाण्यासाठी व त्या बदलांशी जुळवून घेण्यासाठी आवश्यक असलेली लवचिकता व स्थानिक उपाय शोधण्याची कौशल्ये विकसित करणे शक्य होईल. 

टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू (TROP ICSU) (https://climatescienceteaching.org/https://tropicsu.org/) प्रकल्पाचे उद्दिष्ट शालेय व महाविद्यालयीन शिक्षणाच्या गाभ्यामधे वातावरण बदलांशी निगडित विषयांचा समावेश करून विद्यार्थ्याना वातावरण बदलांची कारणे व परिणाम यांच्याबद्दल जाणीव करून देणे असे आहे. संपूर्ण मानवतेनी त्यांच्या क्षमता, कौशल्ये आणि महत्वाकांक्षा वातावरण बदलांच्या समस्येवर केंद्रित कराव्यात ह्यासाठी ज्ञानाचे लोकशाही-करण करण्याच्या कल्पना पुढे आली आहे. टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू प्रकल्प हा त्याचाच एक भाग आहे.  

शालेय व महाविद्यालयीन शिक्षणाच्या गाभ्यामध्ये वातावरण बदलाशी निगडित विषयांचा समावेश करण्यात यावा यासाठी निवडक व विधिग्राह्य शैक्षणिक संसाधनांचा विश्वसनीय स्रोत उपलब्ध करण्या भोवती हा प्रकल्प केंद्रित आहे. असे केल्याने कुठल्याही विद्या-शाखेच्या विद्यार्थ्याना वातावरण बदलांची कारणे व परिणाम यांच्याबद्दल माहिती मिळणे शक्य होईल व वातावरण बदलाच्या सार्वत्रिक समस्येवर नवकारी स्थानिक उपाययोजना राबवण्यासाठी आवश्यक कौशल्ये विकसित करणे शक्य होईल. 

म्हणजेच, दर्जेदार शिक्षण (लक्ष्य ४) व वातावरण कारवाई (लक्ष्य १३) या संयुक्त राष्ट्राच्या धारणीय प्रगती लक्ष्यांशी टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू प्रकल्प संरेखित आहे. 

 

ह्या प्रकल्पाची लक्ष्ये गाठण्या साठी, भारतीय विज्ञान शिक्षण आणि संशोधन संस्था पुणे येथील टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू प्रकल्प अंमलबजावणी गटाने जगभरातील शैक्षणिक संसाधनांची तुलना करून, निवडक संसाधनांचा संग्रह विकसित करून, तो विधिग्राह्य केला आहे. वातावरण बदलांशी निगडित उदाहरणे, दाखला अभ्यास (केस स्टडी) आणि उपक्रम असलेल्या ह्या संग्रहाचा उपयोग वातावरण बदलांशी निगडित शाखा-निहाय विषय शिकवण्यासाठी होईल. शिकवत असलेल्या अभ्यासक्रमात वातावरण बदलाचे शिक्षण एकत्रित करण्याचा नवीन शैक्षणिक दृष्टिकोन ह्या प्रकल्पाने दर्शविला आहे. ह्या प्रकल्पाचा भाग म्हणून, ह्या गटाने मोठ्या संख्येने शैक्षणिक संसाधने (काहींमध्ये टप्प्या-टप्प्याने सविस्तरपणे पाठ आराखडाही आहे) विकसित केली आहेत. शालेय व महाविद्यालयीन शिक्षणाच्या गाभ्यामध्ये वातावरण बदलाशी निगडित विषयांचा समावेश करण्यासाठी हा संकल्पनेचा पुरावा (प्रूफ ऑफ कन्सेप्ट) आहे. 

अभ्यासक्रमातील विषयांशी वातावरण बदलांतील विषय सहजपणे एकत्रित व्हावेत व वैज्ञानिक दृष्ट्या ते विधिग्राह्य असावेत यासाठी सविस्तर पद्धतीने हे विषय मांडले आहेत. टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू च्या शैक्षणिक संसाधनांमुळे शिक्षकांना शिक्षणाचा दर्जा तर वाढवता येईलच, शिवाय सध्याच्या अभ्यासक्रमाला धक्का न लावता मुलांमध्ये  वातावरण बदलाबाबतची जागरुकता वाढवणे शक्य होईल.  

प्रकल्पाच्या पहिल्या टप्प्यात प्रकल्प अंमलबजावणी गटाने भारत, भुतान, दक्षिण अफ्रिका, युगांडा, इजिप्त, फ्रांस, ऑस्ट्रिया, यू.के., चीन व आस्ट्रेलिया येथे शिक्षकांसाठी  कार्यशाळा घेतल्या. ह्या कार्यशाळांमधे, स्थानिक शिक्षकांनी ही शैक्षणिक संसाधने किती प्रभावी आहेत याचे मूल्यमापन केले. काही ठिकाणी वातावरण बदल ह्या विषयातील तज्ज्ञांनी उपक्रमात भाग घेऊन अभिप्राय नोंदवले. यूएनसीसी लर्न (UNCC: Learn), जागतिक हवामान विज्ञान संघटना (World Meteorological Organization (WMO)), जागतिक हवामान संशोधन कार्यक्रम (World Climate Research Programme (WCRP)) या व अश्या सारख्या संयुक्त राष्ट्राच्या संघटनांशी सहयोग प्रस्थापित केला गेला आहे. ह्या संघटनांनी पाठ आराखडा व शैक्षणिक साधने विधिग्राह्य तर केलीच पण संपूर्ण प्रकल्पाला पुष्टी दिली. प्रकल्पाच्या चमूला, १४-१५ मे २०१९ रोजी न्यूयॉर्क येथील संयुक्त राष्ट्राच्या मुख्यालयात झालेल्या संयुक्त राष्ट्राच्या चौथ्या विज्ञान, तंत्रज्ञान व नविनीकरण मंच २०१९  (4th UN STI Forum 2019) येथे, त्यांच्या ह्या शैक्षणिक कामाबद्दल सादरीकरण करायची संधी मिळालि.  ११ जुलै २०१९ रोजी झालेल्या शाश्वत विकासासाठी उच्चस्तरीय राजकीय मंच २०१९ च्या “वातावरण व हवामान कारवाई विषयी दर्जेदार शिक्षणासाठी प्रणाली व पद्धती (Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action)” ह्या सत्रातही त्यांनी आपले काम सादर केले. ह्या खेरीज ह्या चमूने पोलंड येथील सीओपी २४ व शिक्षक व वातावरण-तज्ज्ञांसाठी असलेल्या इतर कार्यशाळा व परिषदांमध्येही भाग घेतला.

जगभरात, विशेषत: तरूण मुलांमध्ये, वातावरण बदलांविषयी काळजी वाढत आहे. तसेच इटली सारख्या देशांनी वातावरण बदल हा विषय प्रत्येक मुलाच्या अभ्यासक्रमात समाविष्ट केला आहे. ह्या पार्श्वभूमीवर टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू प्रकल्पाची वेळ अगदी योग्य आहे.

टीआरओपी आयसीएसयू प्रकल्पाच्या पहिला टप्प्याला (२०१७-२०१९) आंतरराष्ट्रीय विज्ञान परिषदेच्या (International Science Council (ISC)) तीन वर्षांच्या अनुदानाद्वारे अर्थसहाय्य मिळाले आहे. 

Credits

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds, Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by Gubbi Labs, India

 

दुनिया भर के पाठ्यक्रम में जलवायु परिवर्तन पर शिक्षा

  • जलवायु परिवर्तन हमारे समय के सबसे महत्वपूर्ण मुद्दों में से एक है।
  • यह सभी देशों और उनके नागरिकों के दीर्घकालिक और न्यायसंगत विकास को प्रभावित करता है।
  • इसके समाधान के लिए आवाम को मुद्दों के प्रति जागरूक होना आवश्यक है।
  • जलवायु परिवर्तन के प्रभावों को कम करने के उपायों में ऐसे समाधान शामिल होंगे जो स्थानीय रूप से निहित हैं लेकिन वैश्विक विज्ञान पर आधारित हैं।
  • औपचारिक शिक्षा प्रणाली में जलवायु परिवर्तन की शिक्षा का शामिल किया जाना जलवायु परिवर्तन को समझने, कम करने, और लड़ने के लिए स्थानीय रूप से प्रासंगिक समाधान तय करने के लिए आवश्यक योग्यता के साथ वर्तमान और भविष्य की पीढ़ियों को लैस कर सकता है।

TROP ICSU परियोजना (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org/) का उद्देश्य है विद्यालय और स्नातक के स्तर पर जलवायु परिवर्तन से संबंधित विषयों को शामिल करना, जिससे इसके कारणों और प्रभावों के प्रति छात्रों के बीच जागरूकता बढ़ाई जा सके। TROP ICSU परियोजना ज्ञान के लोकतंत्रीकरण की दृष्टि का हिस्सा है, ताकि पूरी मानवता अपनी प्रतिभा, कौशल, और महत्वाकांक्षा को जलवायु परिवर्तन की समस्याओं को दूर करने के लिए केंद्रित कर सकें।

इस परियोजना का मुख्य उद्देश्य मान्य शैक्षणिक संसाधनों का एक विश्वसनीय स्रोत प्रदान करना है जो जलवायु परिवर्तन सम्बंधित विषयों को औपचारिक शिक्षा प्रणाली के मुख्य पाठ्यक्रम में एकीकृत करे। यह पद्धति सुनिश्चित करेगी कि सभी छात्र अपने विषयों/अध्ययन के क्षेत्रों के साथ जलवायु परिवर्तन के कारणों और प्रभावों से अवगत होंगे, और इस वैश्विक समस्या के उन्नतिशील स्थानीय समाधान विकसित करने के कौशल से लैस होंगे।

अतएव, TROP ICSU परियोजना संयुक्त राष्ट्र के सतत विकास लक्ष्यों (SDGs) में उत्कृष्ट शिक्षा (लक्ष्य 4) और जलवायु कार्रवाई (लक्ष्य 13) के साथ श्रेणीबद्ध है।

परियोजना के इन लक्ष्यों की प्राप्ति के लिए भारतीय विज्ञान शिक्षा और अनुसंधान संस्थान (IISER), पुणे  आधारित TROP ICSU परियोजना कार्यान्वयन टीम ने दुनिया भर के शिक्षण संसाधनों का एक भंडार विकसित, समानुक्रमित, स्थापित, और मान्य किया है जिसका शिक्षकों द्वारा जलवायु परिवर्तन से संबंधित उदाहरणों, केस अध्ययनों और गतिविधियों का उपयोग करके अनुशासन-विशिष्ट विषयों को पढ़ाने के लिए उपयोग किया जा सकता है। इस परियोजना ने मौजूदा पाठ्यक्रम में जलवायु परिवर्तन शिक्षा को एकीकृत करने के नए शैक्षणिक दृष्टिकोण को प्रदर्शित किया है। इस परियोजना के अंतर्गत, टीम ने जलवायु परिवर्तन सम्बंधित विषयों को मुख्य पाठ्यक्रम में एकीकृत करने की अवधारणा के प्रमाण के रूप में बड़ी संख्या में शिक्षण संसाधन (कुछ विस्तृत, चरण-दर-चरण पाठ योजनाओं के साथ) विकसित किए हैं। पाठयक्रम विषयों में जलवायु परिवर्तन विषयों की वैज्ञानिक वैधता और निर्बाध एकीकरण को सुनिश्चित करने के लिए एक विस्तृत कार्यप्रणाली अपनाई गई है। इस प्रकार TROP ICSU शैक्षिक संसाधनों का उपयोग कर शिक्षक मुख्य पाठ्यक्रम से हटे बिना छात्रों में जलवायु परिवर्तन के प्रति जागरूकता बढ़ाने के साथ शिक्षा की गुणवत्ता भी बढ़ा पाएंगे।

परियोजना के पहले चरण में टीम ने भारत, भूटान, दक्षिण अफ्रीका, युगांडा, मिस्र, फ्रांस, ऑस्ट्रिया, ब्रिटेन, चीन और ऑस्ट्रेलिया में शिक्षकों और शिक्षाविदों के लिए कार्यशालाएं आयोजित की हैं। इन कार्यशालाओं में स्थानीय शिक्षकों ने इन शिक्षण संसाधनों की प्रभावशीलता का मूल्यांकन किया। कुछ जगहों पर जलवायु परिवर्तन विशेषज्ञों ने भी कार्यशालाओं में भाग लिया और अपने अपने फीडबैक दिए। इसके अलावा संयुक्त राष्ट्र के संगठन, जैसे UNCC: Learn, विश्व मौसम विज्ञान संगठन (WMO), और विश्व जलवायु अनुसंधान कार्यक्रम (WCRP) के साथ मजबूत सहकारिता स्थापित की गई है, जिन्होंने न केवल पाठ योजनाओं और शिक्षण उपकरणों को मान्यता दी है, बल्कि इस पूरी परियोजना समर्थन भी किया है। इस प्रोजेक्ट की टीम को 14-15 मई 2019 को न्यूयॉर्क में संयुक्त राष्ट्र के मुख्यालय में चौथे संयुक्त राष्ट्र एसटीआई फोरम 2019 के दौरान विज्ञान शिक्षा के कार्यक्रम में अपने शैक्षिक प्रयासों को प्रस्तुत करने का अवसर मिला। इसके अलावा, दीर्घकालिक विकास के उच्चस्तरीय राजनीतिक मंच 2019 (HLRF 2019) पर 11 जुलाई 2019 को संयुक्त राष्ट्र के मुख्यालय में आयोजित "पर्यावरण और जलवायु कार्रवाई के लिए गुणवत्तापूर्ण शिक्षा पर अभ्यास और दृष्टिकोण" नामक एक सत्र में टीम ने अपनी प्रस्तुति दी। साथ ही, टीम ने पोलैंड में आयोजित COP 24 के दौरान शिक्षकों और जलवायु विशेषज्ञों के सम्मेलनों और कार्यशालाओं में जलवायु शिक्षा कार्यक्रमों में भी भाग लिया।

TROP ICSU एक बहुत ही सामयिक पहल है, जैसा कि दुनिया भर के लोगों (विशेष रूप से युवाओं) में चिंता के बढ़ते स्तर से देखा जा सकता है। साथ ही कुछ देशों द्वारा उठाए गए कदमों में भी, जैसे इटली, जहाँ हर बच्चे के पाठ्यक्रम में जलवायु परिवर्तन पर शिक्षा को शामिल किया गया है।

TROP ICSU परियोजना (2017-2019) के पहले चरण को अंतर्राष्ट्रीय विज्ञान परिषद (ISC) से तीन साल के अनुदान द्वारा समर्थित किया गया था।

 

Credits

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds, Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by Gubbi Labs, India

 

Undergraduate Humanities (Cultural Studies, Literature, History) teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach critical analysis of a comprehensive text in climate literature.

Dipesh Chakrabarty, a Lawrence A. Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor of History, South Asian Languages, Civilizations and Law, at the University of Chicago, authored a seminal essay, ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’ in 2009. This lesson plan will enable your students to critically analyze this text and acquaint themselves with the field of environmental history.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Humanities (Cultural Studies, Literature, History).

This is a teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does the crisis of climate change spell the collapse of the distinction between Natural History and Human History?
  2. What is the idea of the Anthropocene and how does it qualify humanist theories of freedom?
  3. How do you reconcile the global histories of capital and the species history of humans in the Anthropocene?
  4. How does climate change challenge our understanding of the human universal or collectivity?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Humanities (Cultural Studies, Literature, History)
Topic(s) in Discipline Human History, Environmental History,

Natural History, Anthropocene, History of Capital,

Species History

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance

Introduction to Climate Change

Location Global, India
Language(s) English
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 min

Contents

Reading

(40 min)

An essay that discusses the idea that the discipline of history to date has not adequately addressed the environmental history of the planet.

Go to the Reading

Video micro-lecture 

(~5 min)

A video micro-lecture that summarizes the key points of the four theses discussed in the above-mentioned essay.

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Begin your classroom session by introducing Dipesh Chakrabarty, the author of the essay ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’, the text to be critically analyzed.
  2. Then ask your students to read the introduction to the essay.
  3. Discuss the questions raised by the author about the environmental history of the planet reported to date using the following points:
    1. Why the discipline of history itself is unable to capture what is significantly different about what is called the Anthropocene
    2. Definition of Anthropocene and how humans have become geological agents
    3. The same faculty that allows us to picture the past also allows us to imagine the future
  4. Now direct your students to read the essay closely.
  5. At the end of every section, discuss the over-arching arguments presented by the author.

Go to the essay 'The Climate of History: Four Theses

 

Step 2: Extend understanding and summarize the key points of the essay

  1. Play the video micro-lecture, 'A Commentary on ‘The Climate of History: Four theses' by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India to focus your students’ attention on the key points/arguments presented by the author of the essay.
  2. Pause the video micro-lecture at will to allow your students to re-visit the text and to extend their understanding of the essay through a classroom discussion using the following points:
  3. Thesis 1 The distinction between natural and human history is a distinction that has to be dropped in this new era
  4. The assumption was that all history was the history of human affairs but we (humans) are now a part of the environment and this collapse that separated the natural from the man-made worlds requires a unity now in order to fully understand what the Anthropocene era entails.
  5. Thesis 2 talks about the emergence of humans as a geological force and how this “severely qualifies humanist histories of modernity/ globalization”
  6. Has human freedom been placed under a cloud in the era of the Anthropocene?
  7. Thesis 3 The Anthropocene requires us to put global histories of capital in conversation with the species history of humans
  8. The argument that we must mix these two histories comes from the fact that capitalism has also always changed but this is also to be seen as a species history. In modernity and early modernity and history needs to be viewed not in this short time frame and to think in species terms changes the way in which the discipline itself functions.
  9. In the fourth thesis we can probe the limits of historical understanding by the cross hatching of species history and capital history.

 

Go to the video micro-lecture, 'A Commentary on ‘The Climate of History: Four theses'

As a High School or Undergraduate Physics or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about the characteristics, properties and types of waves and oscillations, and how atmospheric wave dynamics possibly influence extreme weather events.

A wave is a continuous oscillation of a field about its equilibrium value. The wave traverses through the medium but when some parts of the medium are fixed then the waves reflect at this fixed point, become stationary, and are called standing waves. Standing waves occur in the atmosphere very often, due to heating in the tropical regions, land surface features like mountains, and land-water temperature gradients. Recent research suggests that the interaction of standing and travelling atmospheric Rossby waves could result in extreme weather events, such as heat waves and floods.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics or Earth Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Simple Harmonic Motion

Rossby Waves

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Distinguish between simple harmonic motion and waves.
  1. What are standing waves? Describe their characteristics.
  1. What are Rossby waves and how do they influence Earth’s weather patterns?
  1. How could the interference of atmospheric Rossby waves cause extreme weather events?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Physics, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Waves, Oscillations, Simple Harmonic Motion

Stationary Waves, Standing Waves, Rossby Waves

Wave Interference, Wave Forcing, Teleconnections

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline, An interactive tool available in several languages
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Reading

(~35 min)

 

A reading that introduces the topic of waves and oscillations in detail and describes their properties using graphical representations and mathematical expressions.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~13.5 min)

A video that describes how standing waves are formed due to fixed points in a medium.

Go to the Video

Video micro-lecture

(4 min)

A video micro-lecture that describes what Rossby waves are and how their interference by standing waves in the atmosphere influence mid-latitudinal weather conditions and in some cases, extreme weather events.

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Simple harmonic motion (SHM) is the oscillation of a single particle about a point of equilibrium. Usually, particles don’t exist by themselves and are part of a medium such as gas, liquid or solid. If some particles are provided with the energy to perform SHM, they transfer this energy to their neighboring particles, which then perform simple harmonic motion SHM themselves. This transfer of energy continues until most of the particles in the medium are in SHM. If there is no continuous source of energy, the particles initially performing SHM come back to rest, but the energy gets transferred. This phenomenon of energy transfer from one particle to its neighbor is a wave. The particles themselves do not move very far, but the energy contained in them travels a very long distance.

Thus, a wave is a continuous oscillation of a field about its equilibrium value. This field could be a physical medium such as water, ground, air or it could be electric and magnetic fields. In the former case, the wave is called a mechanical wave and in the latter case, the wave is called an electromagnetic wave.

Use the textbook chapter, ‘8.1: Introduction to Waves’ by Dina Zhabinskaya et al., LibreTextsTM to teach your students the topic of waves and oscillations in detail.

  1. Navigate through the different sections of this chapter to teach your students different aspects of waves- their properties and characteristics.
  2. Use the in-text examples and exercises to explain the various concepts better.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Extend understanding of the characteristics of waves

The speed with which a wave traverses a medium is determined by the properties of the medium. If a wave passes through two different media, the direction of propagation changes as it passes from one medium to another. This change in direction is proportional to the angle at which the wave is incident at the interface between the two media. This turning of waves is called refraction.

It is also possible that the wave cannot pass through the interface between the media and instead is “turned back” into the medium from which it came. This “turning back” of waves is called reflection. If the medium through which a mechanical wave is passing is perfectly elastic, then the medium itself does not absorb any of the energy transmitted by the wave. Most real media are not perfectly elastic, and hence the energy transmitted by the wave reduces as the wave passes through the medium. This phenomenon is called absorption of the wave by the medium.

When some parts of the medium are fixed- for example, if you tie the ends of a rope using nails- then the waves reflect at this fixed point and become stationary. This is called a standing wave.

Use the video, ‘Standing waves on strings’ by Khan Academy, to explain what standing waves are, how they are formed and what their characteristics are.

  1. Explain how these standing waves interfere with the travelling waves and show altered net wavelengths and amplitudes.
  2. Use the video to emphasize on the different aspects of superimposition of these waves due to interference such as destructive and constructive interference.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Discuss an example of wave interference and its consequences in Earth’s atmosphere

  1. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘Rossby waves and extreme weather’ by Kai Kornhuber, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, to introduce your students to atmospheric Rossby waves.
  2. Describe, using the video, how the free-flowing Rossby waves influence weather between the Arctic and the mid-latitudinal regions.
  3. Discuss the interference of the free-flowing Rossby waves with naturally occurring standing waves formed due to mountain ranges and land-water temperature gradients.
  4. Finally, explain how this interaction of standing and travelling waves can also result in extreme weather events, such as heat waves and floods.
  5. Emphasize on the increased frequency of such events and discuss how the interference of the Rossby waves could be responsible for this aspect of climate change.

Go to the Video

 

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about CRISPR: Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, a new gene editing technology that could enable certain species to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

This lesson plan includes resources that teach about gene editing using the CRISPR-Cas 9 pathway in bacteria. This pathway is a part of the adaptive immunity against phage infection in bacteria. It can be engineered to be used as a gene editing tool in living organisms. This lesson plan includes case studies that show how CRISPR gene editing technology can be used as a climate adaptation strategy.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Sneha Bhogale, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the function of CRISPR in bacteria? Describe the main components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system.
  2. Describe the two main DNA repair mechanisms in a cell.
  3. Explain how the CRISPR gene editing technique exploits the cell’s DNA repair system to introduce targeted mutations.
  4. How can CRISPR gene editing help plant breeding programs to adapt to the effects of climate change? Elaborate using a suitable example.
  5. Discuss the use of CRISPR technology as a climate adaptation strategy to conserve coral reefs.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gene Editing, CRISPR, CRISPR-Cas9 Pathway

DNA Repair Mechanisms, Double Stranded Breaks (DSBs)

Non- Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

Homologous Recombination (HR)

Targeted Mutations, Nucleases

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Video

(~4 min)

A video to introduce the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway in bacteria and the CRISPR gene editing technique.

Go to the Video

Visualization (35 – 40 min) An interactive visualization to teach about the DNA repair mechanisms in cells and how the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique can be used to exploit these repair systems to achieve targeted mutations in living cells. A section in the tool also discusses some applications of this gene editing technology.

Go to the Visualization

Video and Reading

(~3 min + 5 min)

Case studies to demonstrate the use of CRISPR gene editing technology as a climate adaptation strategy in living organisms.

Video is here

Reading is here

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Begin with introducing what gene editing is and explain how it is different from genetic engineering- Gene editing, is a process in which DNAis inserted, deleted, modified or replaced at a specific site in the genome of a living organism. Genetic engineering, on the other hand randomly inserts or deletes genetic material to introduce mutations.
  2. In gene editing, nucleases/ molecular scissors are used which introduce a double stranded break (DSB) in the DNA at specific locations after which DNA repair mechanisms of the cell take over resulting in targeted mutations (edits).
  3. Then, briefly discuss the commonly used nucleases- meganucleases, Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector-based nucleases (TALENS) and CRISPR- that are used for gene editing.
  4. Emphasize that this lesson plan will focus on the CRISPR-Cas9 system of gene editing, as it is reported in recent times to be more efficient and effective than the others.
  5. Use this animated video, ‘Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas9’, narrated by Feng Zhang, McGovern Institute of Brain Research, MIT, to introduce the topic of gene editing using CRISPR-Cas9 system and to briefly describe the structural components of the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Extend understanding of the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway and CRISPR gene editing using an interactive visualization

  1. Use the interactive visualization, ‘CRISPR-Cas9 Mechanism & Application’ by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) BioInteractive, to enable your students to visualize how the CRISPR-Cas9 technology works at the molecular level and to explore its different components.
  2. Start by launching the ‘interactive’ component of the visualization tool.
  3. Navigate through the visualization to sequentially describe the gene-editing events of targeting and binding of the CRISPR-Cas9 complex to the target DNA, cleaving or breaking of the DNA at the target location and repairing of the DNA to introduce the desired mutation.
  4. Use the ‘explore’ button at every step to describe the different molecular components involved in the pathway.
  5. Use the tab, ‘How it’s used’ to view 20 short videos that explain how CRISPR gene editing technology can be used to achieve different results in its applications in science and industry.

Go to the visualization

 

Step 3: Discuss two case studies where CRISPR gene editing has been used as a climate adaptation strategy

  1. Use the video, ‘Gene editing yields tomatoes that flower and ripen weeks earlier’ by Zachary Lippman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), to describe his use of CRISPR gene editing in two varieties of tomato plants to make them flower and ripen earlier than usual.
  2. Use the video to explain how this approach is useful to obtain faster and higher yields of the tomato crop.
  3. Discuss, using the video how this will also enable plants to be grown in higher latitudes, thereby offsetting crop loss, if any, due to global warming.
  4. To enable better understanding of Dr Lippman’s work, direct your students to listen to a CSHL Base Pairs podcast, link to which is available in the additional resources section of this lesson plan.
  5. Use the reading, ‘CRISPR used to genetically edit coral’ by Hanae Armitage, Office of Communication, Stanford Medicine, to explain the proof-of-principle study published in PNAS by Phillip Cleves et al. (2018).
  6. Use this brief communication to explain how this work could allow researchers to use the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool to identify and knock-out the coral genes responsible for coral bleaching due to ocean acidification.
  7. Discuss how this technique can thus be useful for coral conservation by building climate-resilient corals.

Go to the Video

Go to the Reading

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about evolutionary adaptations in animals due to climate change.

Evolutionary Adaptation is the morphological or physiological adjustment of organisms to their environment to improve their chances of survival. With climate change associated altered precipitation patterns, rising sea-levels, and extreme weather events, ecosystems across the globe are being disrupted. This lesson plan includes resources that explain how climate change is affecting many animals species and how they are adapting to their changed environments.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Rajendra Phartyal and Dr Mansi Verma, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

The brown butterfly from Africa

American Pika

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is evolutionary adaptation? Give suitable examples.
  1. How is adaptation different from phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental changes?
  1. How is climate change influencing evolutionary adaptations in living organisms?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Evolutionary Adaptations, Natural Selection

Phenotypic Variations, Genetic Variations

Gene Frequency, Phenotypic Plasticity

Morphological or Physiological Traits, Epigenetic Factors

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
40-70 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading to introduce the topic of adaptation in living organisms.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~5 min)

A video that briefly explains how and why animals are adapting in response to climate change.

Go to the Video

Reading

(15 min)

A reading to explain how climate change induced evolutionary adaptations occur in several animal species.

Go to the Reading

Optional: Teaching Module

(2 sessions of 35 min each)

A detailed case study of the willow leaf beetle’s adaptation in North America to a warming climate.

Go to the Teaching Module

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the text, ‘Adaptation’ by Encyclopedia Britannica, to introduce the topic of adaptation in living organisms.
  2. Explain the need of several species to adapt to changing environments in order to improve their chances of survival.
  3. Describe the main characteristics of evolutionary adaptations.
  4. Discuss how natural selection works on variations in the species’ populations leading to- inherited morphological or physiological changes- adaptations.
  5. Emphasize on how it differs from other favorable circumstances like useful traits and phenotypic plasticity in organisms, in order to adjust to environmental aberrations.
  6. Finally, discuss the different examples given in text like the adaptation of the peppered moth in wing coloration from the beginning of the industrial revolution, to drive in the point of evolutionary adaptations.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 2: Introduce climate change as a driver of evolutionary adaptation in the wild

  1. Use the video, ‘Can wildlife adapt to climate change?’ by Erin Eastwood for TED-Ed, to briefly introduce your students to climate change as a driver of evolutionary adaptation in several animal species in the wild.
  2. Use the examples in the video to point out how climate change has led to disrupted ecosystems and changed environments for many animal species.
  3. Finally, emphasize on their need to adapt in order to improve their rates of survival.

This can be accessed at:

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Improve understanding of climate change induced evolutionary adaptations

  1. Use the blog, ‘What Helps Animals Adapt (or Not) to Climate Change?’ by Renee Cho, Earth Institute, Columbia University to discuss the different aspects of evolutionary adaptations to climate change in animals.
  2. Explain how a warming climate forces animals to ‘move, adapt or die’.
  3. Use the text to discuss examples of organisms such as corals that show evidence of climate related adaptations.
  4. Describe the role of epigenetics in the phenotypic plasticity of several species that permits them to survive better in unfavorable conditions.
  5. Use the examples in the text to explain how this gives ‘time’ (to evolve) for several species to develop adaptations to changing environmental conditions.
  6. Also, discuss some examples where phenotypic plasticity is not an advantage.
  7. Finally, use the text to discuss how important it is to maintain large species populations and the biodiversity of Earth to allow for short time-scale evolutionary changes to adapt to a changing climate.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 4: (Optional) Use a case study of the willow leaf beetle to extend understanding of evolutionary adaptations to a warming climate

Use this teaching module, ‘Natural selection from the gene up: The work of Elizabeth Dahlhoff and Nathan Rank’ by the Understanding Evolution team, University of California Museum of Paleontology, to examine the research of these scientists to better understand how natural selection shapes the evolutionary process leading to adaptations in the willow leaf beetle, the subject of warming climatic conditions.

Note that this teaching module addresses 3 key questions (as given in the module):

  1. How do biologists study natural selection in the wild?
  2. How do differences at the genetic level translate into changes in populations and ecology?
  3. What are evolutionary trade-offs?

This module is designed such that one or more components may be used for your teaching.

  1. Navigate through the 12 pages of this module by using the tab in the upper right-hand corner of the webpage.
  2. Each page can be printed separately or viewed in print format.
  3. Download the student reading guide (link given at bottom of the webpage) and distribute copies to your students. Use this guide to channel your students through the different aspects of this study using an enquiry-based method (questions given in guide).
  4. Go to page 11 of the module for a list of discussion and extension questions. Use the list to encourage your students to elaborate on their understanding of evolutionary adaptations in a warming climate.

This can be accessed here

Educación sobre el cambio climático en los programas de estudio por todo el mundo

  1. El cambio climático es uno de los problemas más importantes de nuestros tiempos.
  2. Afecta el desarrollo sostenible y equitativo de todos los países y sus ciudadanos.
  3. Las soluciones requieren que la gente sea consciente de los problemas.
  4. Las medidas para mitigar los efectos del cambio climático supondrán soluciones con
    raíces locales pero que están basadas en la ciencia global.
  5. La incorporación de la educación sobre el cambio climático en el sistema educativo formal dotará a las generaciones presentes y futuras con las habilidades claves para determinar soluciones que sean localmente relevantes para la adaptación, la mitigación y la resiliencia al cambio climático.

El proyecto TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org/) pretende integrar temas relacionados con el cambio climático en el programa básico a niveles escolar yde grado para concienciar a los alumnos sobre las causas y los efectos del cambio climático. El proyecto TROP ICSU es parte de la visión de la democratización del conocimiento para que toda la humanidad invierta su talento, destrezas y ambición en una manera concentrada para abordar los problemas del cambio climático.

El objetivo principal del proyecto es proporcionar una fuente fiable de recursos educativos que sean conservados y validados, y que integren temas relacionados con el cambio climático en el programa básico del sistema educativo formal. Este enfoque garantiza que todos los alumnos, independientemente de su disciplina o campo de estudio, tomarán conciencia de las causas y los impactos del cambio climático y estarán dotados de las destrezas necesarias para desarrollar soluciones innovadoras a nivel local para este problema global.
Por consiguiente, el proyecto TROP ICSU se ajusta a los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para Educación de calidad (Objetivo 4) y para Acción por el clima (Objetivo 13).

Para conseguir las metas del proyecto, el equipo de la implementación del proyecto TROP ICSU, situado en Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune desarrolló, recopiló, conservó y validó un repositorio de recursos didácticos de todo el mundo
que los profesores pueden utilizar para enseñar los temas específicos por disciplina usando ejemplos, estudios de caso y actividades relacionadas al cambio climático. El proyecto demostró el novedoso enfoque pedagógico de incorporar la educación sobre el cambio
climático en el programa de estudio actual. Como parte de este proyecto, el equipo desarrolló un gran número de recursos didácticos (algunos con planes de estudio detallados paso por paso) como demostración conceptual de la incorporación de temas sobre el cambio climático en el programa básico. Se adoptó una metodología minuciosa para garantizar la validez científica y la incorporación fluida de los temas sobre el cambio climático en los temas curriculares. Por tanto, el uso de los recursos didácticos de TROP ICSU ayudará a los
profesores a mejorar la calidad del aprendizaje y al mismo tiempo concienciar a los estudiantes sobre el cambio climático sin desviarse del programa básico.

En la primera fase del proyecto, el equipo organizó talleres para profesores y docentes en la India, Bután, Sudáfrica, Uganda, Egipto, Francia, Austria, Reino Unido, China y Australia. En estos talleres, los docentes locales valoraron la eficacia de los recursos didácticos. En algunos sitios, expertos en el cambio climático también asistieron a los talleres y proporcionaron retroalimentación. Se establecieron fuertes colaboraciones continuas con organizaciones de la ONU como UNCC: Learn, la Organización Meteorológica Mundial (OMM), y el Programa Mundial de Investigaciones Climáticas (PMIC), que no solo validaron los planes de estudio y herramientas didácticas sino que también respaldaron el proyecto entero. El equipo del proyecto tuvo una oportunidad de presentar su trabajo educativo en los
eventos de educación científica durante el cuarto UN STI Forum 2019 el 14 y el 15 de mayo de 2019 en la sede de la ONU en Nueva York y también en High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) en la sede de la ONU el 11 de julio de 2019 en
una sesión titulada " Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action " (“Prácticas y enfoques en educación de calidad hacia la acción por el medio ambiente y el clima”). Además, el equipo participó en los eventos educativos sobre el clima en COP 24 en Polonia y en conferencias y talleres para docentes y expertos en el clima.

Como lo muestran los crecientes niveles de preocupación por todo el mundo, especialmente entre la gente joven, la iniciativa TROP ICSU es oportuna, junto con las medidas de algunos países como Italia para expresamente incluir el cambio climático en el programa de estudio de cada niño.

La primera fase del proyecto TROP ICSU (2017-2019) fue apoyada por una subvención de tres años por el International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds, Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by Suyash Daftardar, Freelance Translator, Pune, India.

 

പാഠ്യപദ്ധതിയിലൂടെ ആഗോള തലത്തിലുള്ള കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തിലുള്ള പഠനം

 

  • കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനം ഇന്നത്തെ കാലത്ത് വളരെയധികം പ്രസക്തമായ ഒരു വിഷയമാണ്.
  • അത് രാജ്യങ്ങളുടേയും അവിടുത്തെ പൗരന്മാരുടേയും സുസ്ഥിരവും സന്തുലനാത്മകവുമായ വികസനത്തെ സാരമായി ബാധിക്കുന്നു.
  • ജനങ്ങളെ ഇതിന്റെ ദൂഷ്യഫലങ്ങളെ കുറിച്ച് ബോധവാന്മാരാക്കുക എന്നതാണ് ഇതിനുള്ള പരിഹാരം.
  • കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തിന്റെ ആഘാതം ലഘൂകരിക്കുന്നതിന് പ്രാദേശികവും എന്നാൽ ശാസ്ത്രാധിഷ്ഠിതവുമായ പരിഹാരങ്ങൾ ഇതിൽ ഉൾപ്പെടുന്നു.
  • കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാന പഠനം സാമാന്യ വിദ്യാഭ്യാസ സമ്പ്രദായത്തോട് കൂട്ടിച്ചേർക്കുന്നത് ഇപ്പോഴത്തെയും ഭാവിയിലേയും തലമുറകളെ കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തോട് സമരസപ്പെടുന്നതിനും, ലഘൂകരിക്കുന്നതിനും, അതിജീവിക്കാനും പ്രാപ്തരാക്കും.

 

സ്കൂൾ, ബിരുദതലത്തിലെ കോർ കരിക്കുലത്തിൽ കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനവുമായി ബന്ധപ്പെട്ട വിഷയങ്ങൾ ഉൾപ്പെടുത്തി അതിന്റെ കാരണങ്ങളേയും, പരിണിതഫലങ്ങളേയും കുറിച്ചുള്ള അറിവ് വർദ്ധിപ്പിക്കുന്നതിനാണ് TROP ICSU project (https://climatescienceteaching.org/https://tropicsu.org/) ലക്ഷ്യമിടുന്നത്. ഈ പ്രോജക്ടിന്റെ പ്രധാന ഉദ്ദേശ്യം കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനം എന്ന വിഷയത്തെ സാമാന്യ വിദ്യാഭ്യാസ സമ്പ്രദായത്തിലെ കോർ കരിക്കുലവുമായി സംയോജിപ്പിക്കുന്നതിനുതകുന്ന മൂല്യവത്തും സുസ്ഥിരവുമായ വിദ്യാഭ്യാസ സ്രോതസ്സായി വർത്തിക്കുക എന്നതാണ്. അറിവ് ജനകീയമാക്കുന്നതിലൂടെ മാനവരാശിക്ക് അവരുടെ പ്രാപ്തിയും, കഴിവും, ആഗ്രഹങ്ങളും കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനം നിമിത്തമുള്ള പ്രശ്നങ്ങളെ കൂടുതൽ കാര്യക്ഷമമായി അഭിമുഖീകരിക്കാനായി ഉപയോഗിക്കുവാനാകും.

 

എല്ലാ വിദ്യാർത്ഥികളേയും അവരുടെ പാഠ്യവിഷയത്തിനതീതമായി കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തിന്റെ ഭവിഷ്യത്തുകളെ കുറിച്ച് ബോധവാന്മാരാക്കുന്നതിനും, അവരുടെ കഴിവുകളെ ഉപയോഗപ്പെടുത്തി ഈ ആഗോള പ്രശ്നത്തെ നേരിടാൻ നൂതന പരിഹാര മാർഗ്ഗങ്ങൾ രൂപപ്പെടുത്തുക എന്നതുമാണ്  ഈ പദ്ധതിയിലൂടെ ഉദ്ദേശിക്കുന്നത്.

 

അതുകൊണ്ട് തന്നെ TROP ICSU പ്രോജക്ട് ഐക്യരാഷ്ട്ര സഭയുടെ സുസ്ഥിര വികസന ലക്ഷ്യങ്ങളായ (SDGs) മൂല്യവർധിത വിദ്യാഭ്യാസം (Goal 4), കാലാവസ്ഥാ ആക്ഷൻ (Goal 13) എന്നിവയുമായി പാരസ്പര്യത്തിൽ നിൽക്കുന്നു.

 

പ്രോജക്ടിന്റെ തുടക്കമെന്നോണം ഇന്ത്യൻ ഇൻസ്റ്റിറ്റ്യൂട്ട് ഓഫ് സയൻസ് എഡ്യൂക്കേഷൻ ആന്റ് റിസർച്ച് (IISER), പൂണെയിലെ TROP ICSU പ്രോജക്ട് ഇംപ്ലിമെന്റേഷൻ ടീം വിഷയാധിഷ്ഠിതമായ പാഠഭാഗങ്ങളെ കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനവുമായി ബന്ധപ്പെട്ട ഉദാഹരണങ്ങൾ, കേസ് പഠനങ്ങൾ പ്രവർത്തനങ്ങൾ എന്നിവയിലൂടെ പഠിപ്പിക്കുന്നതിന് ഉപയുക്തമാകുന്ന തരത്തിൽ അധ്യാപന സഹായക സ്രോതസ്സ് ഉണ്ടാക്കി. കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തെ നിലവിലുള്ള പാഠ്യപദ്ധതിയുമായി കൂട്ടിയിണക്കുന്നതെങ്ങനെ എന്നതിന് ഒരു ഉദാഹരണമാണ് ഈ പ്രോജെക്ട്. കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാന വിഷയങ്ങളെ കരിക്കുലം വിഷയങ്ങളുമായി കൂട്ടിയിണക്കുന്നതിന് ശാസ്ത്രീയ അടിസ്ഥാനമുള്ള ഒരു രീതിശാസ്ത്രം തന്നെ സ്വീകരിച്ചിട്ടുണ്ട്. കോർകരിക്കുലത്തിൽ നിന്നും വ്യതിചലിക്കാതെ തന്നെ കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തെ കുറിച്ചുള്ള ബോധം കുട്ടികളിൽ വർദ്ധിപ്പിക്കാൻ TROP ICSU എഡ്യൂക്കേഷനൽ റിസോഴ്‌സസ് അധ്യാപകരെ സഹായിക്കുന്നു.

 

ഈ പ്രോജക്ടിന്റെ ആദ്യ ഘട്ടത്തിൽ ഇന്ത്യ, ഭൂട്ടാൻ, ദക്ഷിണാഫ്രിക്ക, ഉഗാണ്ട, ഈജിപ്ത്, ഫ്രാൻസ്, ആസ്ട്രിയ, UK, ചൈന, ആസ്ട്രേലിയ തുടങ്ങിയ രാജ്യങ്ങളിലെ അധ്യാപകർക്കും വിദ്യാഭ്യാസ വിചഷണർക്കും വർക്ക്‌ഷോപ്പുകൾ സംഘടിപ്പിച്ചു. ഈ വർക്ക്ഷോപ്പുകളിൽ പ്രാദേശീയരായ അധ്യാപകർ ഈ അധ്യാപന വിഭവങ്ങളുടെ പ്രായോഗികത മനസ്സിലാക്കി. ചില സ്ഥലങ്ങളിൽ കാലാവസ്ഥാ വ്യതിയാനത്തെ കുറിച്ച് അറിവുള്ള വിദഗ്ധർ ഈ വർക്ക്ഷോപ്പുകളിൽ പങ്കെടുക്കുകയും അവരുടെ അഭിപ്രായങ്ങൾ കൂട്ടിച്ചേർക്കുകയും ചെയ്തു. ഐക്യരാഷ്ട്ര സഭയുടെ സംരംഭങ്ങളായ UNCC: ലേൺ, വേൾഡ്‌ മെറ്റീറോളജിക്കൽ ഓർഗനൈസേഷൻ (WMO), ലോക കാലാവസ്ഥാ ഗവേഷണ പദ്ധതി (WCRP) എന്നിവയുമായി നല്ല ഒരു സഹകരണം ഈ പ്രോജക്ടിന് ഉണ്ട്. ഈ സംഘടനകൾ പ്രോജക്ടിന്റെ പദ്ധതികളും അധ്യാപക സഹായികളും പരിശോധിക്കുക മാത്രമല്ല, പ്രോജക്ടിനെ പിന്തുണക്കുകയും ചെയ്തു. ന്യൂയോർക്കിലെ UN തലസ്ഥാനത്ത് 2019 മെയ് 14 - 15 വരെ നടന്ന നാലാമത് UN STI Forum 2019 ലും 2019 ജൂലൈ 11 ന് നടന്ന High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) ലും "Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action" എന്ന വിഭാഗത്തിലും ഈ പ്രോജക്ട് സംഘത്തിന് ഈ പദ്ധതി അവതരിപ്പിക്കാൻ അവസരം ലഭിച്ചു. പിന്നീട് ഈ സംഘം പോളണ്ടിലെ COP 24 ലും, കാലാവസ്ഥാ പഠന ഇവൻ്റുകളിലും അധ്യാപകർക്കും കാലാവസ്ഥാ വിദഗ്ധർക്കുമായി നടത്തിയ കോൺഫറൻസുകളിലും വർക്ക്ഷോപ്പുകളിലും മറ്റും പങ്കെടുത്തു.

 

TROP ICSU യുവതലമുറയിലും, ആഗോളതലത്തിലും രാജ്യങ്ങളെ ഒന്നിച്ചു മുന്നോട്ടു കൊണ്ടുപോകുന്നതിൽ വളരെ പ്രസക്തമായ ഒന്നാണ്.

 

TROP ICSU പ്രോജക്ടിന്റെ മൂന്നു വർഷം നീളുന്ന ആദ്യഘട്ടം (2017-2019) International Science Council (ISC) ന്റെ സാമ്പത്തിക സഹായത്തോടെയാണ്‌ നടപ്പാക്കിയത്.

 

 

Credits

Translated from English to Malayalam

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds and Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India.

 

L’educazione ai cambiamenti climatici nel curricolo scolastico di vari paesi del mondo

  1. I cambiamenti climatici sono uno dei più importanti problemi dei nostri tempi
  2. Essi influenzano lo sviluppo sostenibile ed equo di tutti i paesi e dei loro abitanti
  3. Le soluzioni impongono che le popolazioni siano più consapevoli del problema
  4. Le misure per mitigare gli effetti dei cambiamenti climatici comporteranno soluzionisviluppate a livello locale ma basate sulla scienza globale.
  5. L’integrazione dell’educazione ai cambiamenti climatici nel sistema educativo formale può fornire alle generazioni presenti e future quelle competenze chiave che potranno determinare a livello locale soluzioni per l’adattamento, la mitigazione e la resilienza ai cambiamenti climatici.

Il progetto TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/https://tropicsu.org/) mira a integrare gli argomenti correlati coi cambiamenti climatici ai nuclei curricolari in tutti i livelli scolastici per accrescere negli studenti la consapevolezza delle cause e degli effetti dei cambiamenti climatici. Il TROP ICSU project fa parte della democratizzazione della conoscenza cosicché tutta l’umanità
possa investire il suo talento, le sue competenze e ambizioni per focalizzarsi su una via dedicata ai problemi dei cambiamenti climatici.

Lo scopo principale del progetto è fornire una fonte affidabile di risorse educative curate e validate che integrino gli argomenti dei cambiamenti climatici in nuclei curricolari del sistema educativo formale. Questo approccio assicurerà che tutti gli studenti, indipendentemente dallo studio delle varie discipline, diventino consapevoli delle cause e dell’impatto dei cambiamenti climatici, e siano
forniti di competenze che permettano loro di sviluppare a livello locale soluzioni innovative di questo problema globale.

Così il TROP ICSU project si allinea con gli obiettivi delle Nazioni Unite per lo Sviluppo Sostenibile (SDGs) per un’educazione di qualità (Obiettivo 4) e per l’azione sul clima (Obiettivo 13).

Per raggiungere questi obiettivi, il team per l’implementazione del TROP ICSU project, con sede all’ Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, ha sviluppato, raccolto, curato e validato una collezione di risorse didattiche provenienti da diverse parti del mondo che possono essere usate dagli insegnanti per insegnare argomenti disciplinari con l’uso di esempi, studi
di caso, e attività correlate con i cambiamenti climatici. Il progetto presenta l’ approccio pedagogico innovativo di integrare l’educazione ai cambiamenti climatici nei curricoli esistenti. Come parte di questo progetto, il team ha sviluppato un gran numero di risorse didattiche (alcune con lesson plan dettagliati passo per passo) come prototipi che permettono di integrare argomenti sui cambiamenti
climatici nei nuclei curricolari. Si è adottato una metodologia dettagliata per assicurare la validità scientifica e l’integrazione continua degli argomenti sui cambiamenti climatici con quelli curricolari. In tal modo l’uso delle risorse TROP ICSU aiuteranno gli insegnanti a potenziare la qualità dell’apprendimento e insieme aumentare la consapevolezza negli studenti sui cambiamenti
climatici, senza allontanarsi dai nuclei curricolari.

Nella prima fase del progetto, il team ha condotto workshop per insegnanti ed educatori in India, Bhutan, Sud Africa, Uganda, Egitto, Francia, Austria, Regno Unito, Cina e Australia. A questi workshop, educatori locali hanno valutato l’efficacia delle risorse didattiche. In alcune località, anche esperti sui cambiamenti climatici hanno frequentato i workshop e fornito feedback. Solide collaborazioni ininterrotte sono state intraprese con organizzazioni delle Nazioni Unite come UNCC: Learn, la World Meteorological Organization (WMO), e il World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), che non solo hanno validato i lesson plan e gli strumenti didattici, ma hanno
anche convalidato l’intero progetto. Il team di progetto ha avuto l’opportunità di presentare il loro impegno educativo durante gli eventi sulla Science Education durante il quarto Forum UN STI  2019 il 14-15 maggio 2019 al quartier generale delle Nazioni Unite a New York e anche durante il  High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) al quartier generale
delle Nazioni Unite l’11 luglio 2019, in una sessione intitolata "Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action". Infine il team ha partecipato agli eventi sull’educazione sul clima durante il COP 24 in Polonia e a conferenze e workshop per insegnanti ed esperti del clima.

L’initiativa del TROP ICSU è molto tempestiva, come dimostrato dal livello crescente di preoccupazione, in particolare della popolazione più giovane nel mondo, insieme con la mossa di alcune nazioni, come l’Italia, di includere apertamente i cambiamenti climatici nel curricolo scolastico di ogni fanciullo.

La prima fase del TROP ICSU project (2017-2019) è stata supportata da un finanziamento di tre
anni dell’ International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

Translated from English to Italian:

TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note, Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds and Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation by:
Dr Maddalena Macario
PhD in Plant biosystematics and ecology
PhD in Earth Science Education
Science teacher at Liceo Scientifico “Niccolò Copernico”, Prato, Italy

 

As an Undergraduate teacher of Earth Sciences or Physics or Math, you can teach how to build a mathematical model of the Earth’s climate system using Python. This lesson plan includes discussions, activities, and a detailed guide of how to create a computational model of Earth’s energy balance to understand its role in determining the surface temperature of the planet.

This lesson plan uses resources developed by Prof. David Archer from the University of Chicago. Specifically, it focuses on the “Time dependent Energy-Balance Model for the Earth” that includes fundamental thermodynamics concepts such as blackbody radiation and heat capacities. The model applies these concepts to study how the energy balance between the incident solar radiation and the outgoing terrestrial radiation governs the surface temperature of the planet, and consequently, how it evolves over time. The activity section of this lesson plan includes a detailed instruction manual that serves as a step-by-step guide to conceptualize David Archer’s model in numerical and algorithmic terms, eventually developing a computational model using Python programming.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Math, Earth Sciences and Physics.
This lesson plan was developed by Tatsam Garg, Ashoka University, India.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a Blackbody?
  2. What determines the average surface temperature of planet Earth?
  3. How do you use a mathematical model to build a computational model?
  4. How do you write a simple computational model in Python?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics, Earth Sciences, Phyics
Topic(s) in Discipline Thermodynamics, Blackbody Radiation

Heat Capacity, Computational Modelling with Python

Climate Topic Planetary Energy Balance, Planetary Climate

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
2-3 hours

Contents

Video Lecture

(45 min)

A video lecture by Prof David Archer that explains electromagnetic radiation, the concept of blackbodies and blackbody Radiation. This video also includes discussions on the use of these concepts to explain a basic climate model for determining the surface temperature of a planet.

Go to the Video

Teaching Module

(45 min)

A set of tutorials to learn basic syntax in Python: ‘Introduction to Python: Beginners Guide and Tutorials’

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(60 min)

A programming activity with a detailed step-by-step guide to building the computational time-dependent energy balance model for Earth using Python based on the schematics explained in the video lecture.

The guide for this activity is provided here.

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

1 Introduction to the Time-Dependent Energy Balance Model for the Earth 1.     Play the video lecture, ‘Our first Climate Model’, by Prof David Archer, University of Chicago, to enable your students to understand the scientific background and the schematics of the climate model.

2.     Emphasize the following topics from the video lecture: Incident Solar Energy, the Solar Constant, behavior of a Blackbody, the Stephan-Boltzmann Law, heat capacities, and the heat capacity of water.

3.     Discuss what every parameter in the model means physically.

4.     Remind your students about the units of each quantity that would be required to verify dimensionally correct equations.

Go to the Resource

2 Prepare for Python Programming: By installing Jupyter Notebooks 1.     Ask your students to install a Python programming environment on their computers.

2.     For beginners, we recommend using Jupyter Notebooks. This environment allows you to access tutorials and a programming space where students can simultaneously read instructions and try their hands at programming.

3.     To access Jupyter Notebooks, install the ‘Anaconda-Navigator’ using this link.

4.     Once it is successfully installed on your computer, navigate to the homepage of the software, and click on ‘Install’ in the ‘Jupyter Notebook’ tab.

5.      Once installed, launch the notebook- the ‘Jupyter notebook Homepage’ will open as a webpage.

6.     Open a new ‘Python 3’ file to begin coding.

3 Introduction to Programming with Python Use the link to the Python tutorial database to teach the basics of Python programming such as printing text, defining variables, simple arithmetic operations, import and use of the ‘numpy’ and ‘matplotlib’ libraries, defining arrays and lists, using indices with arrays and lists, and loops (specifically ‘for’ loops). These introductory skills will be required for the ensuing classroom/laboratory activity.

The Python tutorial database can be accessed here. 

4 Classroom/Laboratory Activity Begin by recalling the Time-Dependent Energy Balance Model described in the first resource. Inform your students that this classroom activity involves developing the climate model using Python. This exercise has been adopted from Prof David Archer's course titled “Global Warming II: Create your own models in python”, available on Coursera here.

A detailed step-by-step guide for this activity is provided here for download.

1.     Share the instruction manual for the exercise with each student. The manual  walks you through the entire process of developing the model on Python.

2.     If you want the students to work their way through the exercise themselves, you may avoid sharing the manual with them. Instead, use it to motivate them in the right direction with hints.

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory statistics and specifically linear regression.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach introductory statistics through a linear regression assignment. The lesson plan includes a hands-on computer-based classroom activity to be conducted on a dataset of Global Temperature Anomalies (1850-2017). This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of scatter plots, regression equations, correlation coefficients, linear regression, and confidence intervals for slopes.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Use an example to describe linear regression analysis.
  2. Determine the difference in the confidence intervals for the slopes for two 30-year period datasets- 1850-1880 (beginning of industrial age) and 1987-2017 (last datapoint). What does the result suggest?
  3. Use linear regression analyses to describe how global temperatures have changed from 1850 (pre-industrial)- 2017 (last datapoint).
  4. Discuss reasons for global warming and its impact on Earth’s climate.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Scatter Plots, Correlation Coefficients, Regression Equations, Linear Regression, Confidence Intervals for Slopes
Climate Topic Climate and the Cryosphere

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(25 min)

A teaching module to explain the basics of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, and linear regression

This can be accessed here:

For High School

For Undergraduate

Video micro-lecture

(~7 min)

A video micro-lecture to explain the confidence interval for the slope of a regression line

Go to the Video

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of linear regression using a dataset of the Global Temperature Anomalies (1850-2017).

Go to the Activity

 

Visualization (5 min)

An interactive visualization of the given dataset of Global Temperature Anomalies (1850-2017).

Go to the Resource

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

1 Topic introduction and discussion 1.         Use the teaching module, ‘Introduction-Linear Regression and Correlation’ by OpenStaxTM, Rice University (for High School level) or ‘Chapter-3: Linear Regression’ provided by Ramesh Sridharan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (for Undergraduate level), to introduce these topics of basic statistics.

2.         Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to the basics of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, and linear regression.

3.         Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

For High School

For Undergraduate

2 Develop the topic further 1.   Use the video micro-lecture, ‘Confidence interval for the slope of a regression line’ by Khan Academy to explain this inference about a slope.

2.   Navigate to the next subsection and direct your students to solve practice problems on the confidence interval of slope of a regression line to enable better understanding of the topic.

This can be accessed here

3 Extend understanding 1.   Use the classroom activity, ‘Global Temperature Anomalies’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of linear regression and confidence intervals of slopes of regression lines by using a dataset developed by Climatic Research Unit (University of East Anglia) in conjunction with the Hadley Centre (UK Met Office).

2.   This classroom activity includes a dataset of Global Temperature Anomalies observed from 1850 to 2017. These observations are taken as deviations from the Global Average Mean temperature for the period 1961-1990.

3.   This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet that you may use in your classroom to explain the mathematical functions and methods.

4.   Direct your students to download the Excel file (with dataset) and proceed with the classroom activity.

5.   Encourage your students to answer topical questions by applying their understanding of scatter plots, correlation coefficients, regression equations, linear regression, and confidence intervals of slopes of regression lines.

6.   Use the regression analyses performed to initiate a discussion on the increase in average global temperatures from pre-industrial time (1850) to the last data point (2017) due to anthropogenically forced Global Warming (links to explanatory notes given within the tool).

This can be accessed here.

4 Discuss further 1.   Use the interactive visualization of the same dataset, ‘Average temperature anomaly, Global’ by Our World in Data, to encourage discussion amongst your students about the changes in the average global temperatures from the years 1850-2017.

2.   Discuss how these changes suggest that the planet is warming and therefore, could be impacting Earth’s climate.

These can be accessed here. 

As a high school or undergraduate Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching introductory differential calculus and specifically polynomial differentiation.

The derivative at different points of a differentiable function (Image: Wikipedia)

This lesson plan will allow you to teach introductory derivatives and differentiation. The lesson plan includes a hands-on computer-based classroom activity to be conducted on a dataset of global annual mean surface air temperatures from 1880 to 2018. This activity includes a set of inquiry-based questions that will enable your students to apply their understanding of function composition and polynomial differentiation and to solve tangent line problems.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a ore topic in Mathematics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are derivatives and tangent line equations?
  2. Using an example, describe polynomial differentiation.
  3. Is the global annual mean surface temperature increasing since 1950? Since 1880?
  4. What is the rate of change of global average temperatures?
  5. Predict the global average temperatures for 2030, 2050, and 2100.
  6. What is the latest rate of change of global average temperatures according to the last recorded data point (2018)?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Derivatives, Tangent Lines, Differentiation

Differentiation Rules, Function Composition

Polynomial Differentiation

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere

Climate Variability Record

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(30 min)

A teaching module to explain the basics of derivatives, derivative rules, and differentiation.

Go to the Resource

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A classroom activity to apply understanding of derivatives and polynomial differentiation using a dataset of Global Average Temperatures.

Go to the Activity

Visualizations

(10 min)

A set of visualizations using similar datasets to better understand the changes in global surface temperatures in recent times.

These can be accessed at:

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

Visualization 3

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Differentiation: definition and basic derivative rules’ by Khan Academy, to introduce the concept of derivatives and differentiation.
  2. Navigate to the sub-sections within the module to explain derivative rules, the power rule, and how to differentiate polynomials.
  3. Use the in-built practice exercises and quizzes to evaluate your students’ understanding of the topics.

Go to the Resource

 

Step2 2: Extend understanding

  1. Use the classroom activity, ‘Global Average Temperature’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Professor of Mathematics, Ithaca College, USA, to enable your students to apply their understanding of derivatives and polynomial differentiation using a dataset from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).
  2. This classroom activity includes a dataset of the global annual mean surface air temperature linked from NASA’s observations from 1950 to 2018. It also includes data from 1880 to 2018.
  3. This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.
  4. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.
  5. It further includes questions that you may wish to use in your classroom to explain mathematical functions and methods and to initiate a discussion on the increase in global annual mean surface temperature due to anthropogenically forced global warming.
  6. Direct your students to download the Excel file (with dataset) and the Word document (with directions to use the dataset and a set of questions to analyze the dataset).
  7. Proceed with the classroom activity and encourage your students to answer the questions by applying their understanding of function composition, tangent line equation, and polynomial differentiation.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Discuss further

Use the visualizations, ‘Global Temperature’ by NASA/GISS, ‘Temperature Change; 1880-2019’ by Antti Lipponen using NASA GISTEMP data, and ‘Simulated global temperature change’ by US Geological Survey (USGS) to encourage discussion amongst your students about the real and simulated increase of global surface air temperatures from the years 1880-2020 and 1850-2100 respectively. Discuss how these changes could be affecting Earth’s climate in recent times.

These can be accessed at:

Visualization 1

Visualization 2

Visualization 3

As a Middle School and High School English Language teacher, you can use a talk about climate change and an associated comprehension quiz to help you teach listening comprehension.

. This lesson plan uses the TED talk, “The disarming case to act right now on climate change” by Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, for listening comprehension followed by answering inferential questions, detecting emotive undertones as well as answering narrow focus questions about the vocabulary used. This lesson plan also includes an exercise of writing a response to the speaker via an informal letter, thereby allowing the students to articulate their own thoughts and opinions on the matter of climate change activism and to combine those with the information they have gathered.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) or Functional English.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, IISER Pune, India

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Listen carefully and comprehend a spoken text (a talk) in English
  2. Answer narrow focus as well as broad stroke questions related to the spoken text
  3. Write a letter to the Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, in response to her speech

How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming

Greta Thunberg |TEDx Stockholm

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle School, High school
Discipline English Language, Functional English

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Topic(s) in Discipline Listening Comprehension, Inferential Questions, Emotive Undertones, Vocabulary, Creative Writing, Letter Writing
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change, Climate Activism
Location Global
Language(s) English, Transcript available in 34 languages
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A brief introduction to the Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, whose talk will be examined for listening comprehension in this lesson plan.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~11 min)

A video talk by Greta Thunberg to use for listening comprehension and follow-up exercises. The transcript for this talk is available in 34 languages.

Go to the Video

A questionnaire (~25 min) based on the talk for in-class discussion can be found here.

Optional Homework Assignment

(25 min)

A suggested homework assignment of writing an informal letter as a response to the talk by Greta Thunberg following the in-class discussion.

Go to the Assignment

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and preliminary discussion

  1. Begin with an open discussion in your class based on the following questions:
    1. What do you think of climate change?
    2. What do you think of your role as a child/young adult in reducing climate change?
    3. Do you find yourself having different views than your family or friends about climate change?
  2. Use a news report, ‘Greta Thunberg: 16-year-old climate activist inspired international youth movement’ by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), to introduce them to Greta Thunberg, the speaker of the recorded TED talk, which is the primary text. Thunberg is one of the most well-known faces in climate activism and is herself of school going age. Discuss her primary achievements, her personal struggles, and her arguments for activism among young adults.

Go to the News Report

 

Step 2: Listening comprehension and discussion

  1. Play the video of Greta Thunberg’s TEDxStockholm talk titled, ‘The disarming case to act right now on climate change’. Allow them to listen to it in its entirety.
  2. The recording is about 11 minutes long. Encourage them to listen carefully and try to gather their overall impressions of the speech and speaker, as well as to note down or retain important pieces of information.
  3. Then give them a questionnaire, which is based on the video, in print form, to answer on their own as per the instructions for each question.
  4. Play the video recording once again so that they can correct their answers. You may spend some time discussing their responses.
  5. Then give them a questionnaire, which is based on the video, in print form, to answer on their own as per the instructions for each question.
  6. Play the video recording once again so that they can correct their answers. You may spend some time discussing their responses.

Go to the TEDx Video

Go to the Questionnaire

Go to the Answer Key

 

Step 3: Optional Activity or Homework Assignment

  1. Use the link, ‘How to Write informal Letters in English (With Examples)’ by Owlcation.com, to introduce your students to the basic rules of letter writing (salutations, sign off, and structure).
  2. Instruct the students to use this format to write a letter (homework assignment) to Greta Thunberg as a response to her talk.
  3. To complete this assignment, ask the students to think about climate change and how individuals can change the situation. Direct your students to use their impressions of Thunberg’s speech, coupled with their own ideas about climate change activism and their view of themselves as activists to form the bulk of a letter that they will address to Greta Thunberg.
  4. Instruct the students to include the following points in their letters:
    1. their choice of what they found most important in the talk
    2. how they feel about the issue of climate change
    3. what they do (or wish to do) about climate change
  5. Thus, this letter writing exercise enables two crucial skills to be tested and reinforced: one, the ability to glean and summarize information from an external source, and two: the ability to articulate one’s thoughts and opinions on an important issue and connect that to the information obtained.

Guideline for writing an informal letter

 

ELIMU YA MABADILIKO YA TABIA NCHI KATIKA MTALAA WA ELIMU DUNIANI KOTE.

  1. Mabadiliko ya tabia nchi ni mojawapo wa masuala muhimu katika kipindi cha sasa.
  2. Mabadiliko haya yanaathiri maendeleo endelevu na ya kiusawa ya nchi nyingi pamoja na raia wake.
  3. Ili pawe na utatuzi wa mabadiliko ya tabia nchi, watu wanafaa wafahamishwe kuhusina na hali hii.
  4. Hatua za kupunguza madhara ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi zitahitaji utatuzi ulio na msingi wa kimaeneo lakini zinazokubalika na ulimwengu wa kisayansi.
  5. Kufungamanishwa kwa elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mfumo wa elimu rasmi kutasaidia vizazi vya sasa na vile vijavyo kutambua mbinu mwafaka za kutatua, kupunguza na kukabiliana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Mradi wa TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org) unalenga kuhakikisha kuwa masomo yanayohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi yanaingizwa katika mifumo ya elimu ya  shule za upili na vile vile vyuo vikuu. Hii itachangia utambuzi wa sababu zinazosababisah mabadiliko ya tabia nchi pamoja na madhara yake miongoni mwa wanafunzi. Mradi huu wa TROP ICSU ni kati ya maazimio ya kuhakikisha kuwa kila mwanadamu anaweza akatumia talanta, mbinu na malengo yake  katika njia inayolenga kutatua madhara ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Mradi huu unalenga kuhakikisha kuna njia za kuaminika za kufundishia masomo yanayohusu mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mfumo wa elimu rasmi. Hali hii itahakikisha kuwa kila mwanfunzi minghairi ya kozi anayosomea atakuwa na utambuzi wa visababishi vya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi na atakuwa na mbinu za uvumbuzi wa utatuzi wa hali hii ambayo ni ya kilimwengu.

Kutokana na hili, basi mradi wa TROP ICSU unaoana moja kwa moja na maazimio ya Umoja wa Mataifa ikiwemo azimio la nne ambalo ni elimu bora kwa wote pamoja na azimio la kumi na tatu ambalo ni mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Ili kuafikia malengo ya mradi huu, jopokazi la TROP ICSU lililopo katika Taasisi ya Elimu ya Sayansi na Utafiti IISER iliyopou mjini Pune imebuni na kubainisha  hazina ya vifaa kutoka sehemu mbalimbali za uliwengu. Vifaa hivi vitatumiwa na walimu kufundishia masomo maalum kwa kutumia mifano, uchunguzi, na shughuli zinazohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi. Mradi huu umedhihirisha namna ya kufungamanisha elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mtalaa uliopo. Mradi huu pia umebainisha vifaa mbali mbali vya ufundishaji kama vile (Mpango wa kazi wenye hatua zilizoelezwa kwa undani). Uwepo wa vifaa hivi ni ishara tosha ya juhudi za mradi hu kuhakikisha kuwa masomo yanayohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi yanafungamanishwa na mtalaa rasmi wa elimu. Mradi huu pia umebainisha mbinu za ufundishaji ambazo zinaaminika kisayansi zitakazotumiwa kufundishia masomo yanayohusina na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi kwa kuyafungamanisha na masomo mengine katika mtalaa. Kwa hivyo, matumizi ya vifaa vya ufundishaji vya TROP ICSU yatawasaidia walimu kufundisha elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi huku wakizingatia masomo mengine ya mtalaa.

Katika awamu ya kwanza ya mradi wa TROP ICSU, jopokazi limetoa mafunzo kupitia kwa semina kwa walimu na waelimishaji katika mataifa ya India, Bhutan, Afrika Kusini, Uganda, Misri, Ufaransa, Austria, Uchina, Uingereza na Australia. Katika semina hizi, waelimishaji walihakiki utendakazi wa vifaa hivi vya kufundishia. Wataalam wa elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi pia walihudhuria katika semina zingine na kutoa maoni yao muhimu. Ushirikiano kati ya mashirika ya Umoja wa Mataifa kama UNCC: Learn, Shirika la Hali ya Hewa Duniani (W.M.O) na Shirika la Utafiti wa Tabia Nchi (WCRP) umeahakikisha kuwa, mradi wa TROP ICSU umeidhinishwa pamoja na vifaa vya kufundishia vilivyopendekezwa. Jopokazi hili pia lilipata nafsi ya kuwasilisha hatua za kielimu walizopiga katika 4th UN STI Forum 2019 tarehe 15/05/2019 katika makao makuu ya Umoja wa Mataifa yaliyoko New York na vile vile katika High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) katika makao makuu ya Umoja wa Mataifa tarehe 11/07/2019 chini ya mada “Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action”. Vile vile, jopokazi hili limeshiriki katika mafunzo ya tabia nchi mjini COP 24 huko Uholanzi na pia semina zinazoandaliwa na walemishaji wa tabia nchi pamoja na walimu.

Mradi wa TROP ICSU ni wa kisasa na unaangazia masuala ibuka miongoni mwa vijana pamoja na juhudi za nchi kama Italia kuhakikisha kuwa, elimu ya tabia nchi inafungamanishwa katika mtalaa wa elimu.

Awamu ya kwanza ya mradi wa TROP ICSU ilipata ufadhili wa miaka mitatu kutoka kwas International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

Translated from English to Kiswahili by:
Dr. Hamisi Babusa,
Lecturer of Kiswahili and Language Education and Head Teaching Programmes,
Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya

Education aux changements climatiques à travers des programmes scolaires dans le monde entier:

  1. Le changement climatique est un des enjeux les plus préoccupants aujourd’hui.
  2. Il nuit au développement durable et équitable de tous les pays et de leurs citoyens.
  3. La sensibilisation du grand public vis-à-vis des enjeux est essentielle pour trouver des solutions.
  4. Les mesures visant à atténuer les effets du changement climatique impliqueront des solutions ancrées localement, mais fondées sur la science mondiale.
  5. L'intégration de l'éducation au changement climatique dans le système éducatif formel peut doter les générations actuelles et futures de compétences clés pour identifier des solutions localement pertinentes pour l'adaptation, l’atténuation et la résilience au dérèglement climatique.

Le projet TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/https://tropicsu.org/) vise à intégrer des sujets liés aux changements climatiques dans les programmes de base des écoles et des étudiants de premier cycle universitaire afin de les sensibiliser davantage  aux causes et aux effets des changements climatiques. Ce projet fait partie de la vision de la démocratisation du savoir afin que toute l'humanité puisse investir ses talents, ses compétences et ses ambitions de manière ciblée pour faire face aux problèmes du changement climatique.

L'objectif principal du projet est de fournir une source fiable de ressources éducatives validées qui intègrent les thèmes du changement climatique dans le programme de base du système éducatif formel. Cette approche garantira que tous les étudiants, quels que soient leur discipline ou leur domaine d'études, prendront conscience des causes et des impacts du changement climatique et seront dotés des compétences nécessaires pour trouver des solutions locales novatrices à ce problème mondial.

Le projet TROP ICSU se converge ainsi aux Objectifs du Développement Durable des Nations Unies pour Education de qualité (Objectif 4) et Mesures relatives à la lutte contre les changements climatiques (Objectif 13).

L’équipe chargée de réalisation du projet TROP ICSU, basée à la Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Pune, œuvre à développer, rassembler, organiser et valider un répertoire des outils pédagogiques du monde entier qui peut être utilisé par les enseignants pour enseigner des sujets spécifiques à une discipline en utilisant des exemples, études de cas et activités relatives au changement climatique. Le projet a démontré l'approche pédagogique novatrice de l'intégration de l'éducation au changement climatique dans les programmes existants. Dans le cadre de ce projet, l'équipe a élaboré un grand nombre de ressources pédagogiques (dont certaines sont accompagnées de plans de cours détaillés, étape par étape) pour l'intégration des sujets liés aux changements climatiques dans le programme de base. Une méthodologie détaillée a été adoptée pour assurer la validité scientifique et l'intégration sans faille des thèmes du changement climatique dans les programmes scolaires. Ainsi, l'utilisation des ressources éducatives du TROP ICSU aidera les enseignants à améliorer la qualité de l'apprentissage tout en sensibilisant davantage les élèves au changement climatique, sans s'écarter du programme scolaire.

Les ateliers destinés aux enseignants ont été organisés dans un premier temps en Inde, au Bhoutan, en Afrique du Sud, en Ouganda, en Egypte, en France, en Autriche, au Royaume Uni, en Chine et en Australie par l’équipe du projet. Cela a permis aux enseignants locaux d’évaluer la pertinence des ressources proposées. Les avis des experts en domaine de changements climatiques ont également été recueillis lors de certains ateliers. Nous collaborons étroitement avec des organismes des Nations Unies tels que Le Partenariat One UN pour l’Apprentissage sur les Changements Climatiques (UN CC:Learn), l’Organisation météorologique mondiale (OMM) et le Programme mondial de recherche sur le climat (PMRC), qui ont non seulement validé les plans de cours et les outils pédagogiques, mais ont également approuvé l'ensemble du projet. L'équipe du projet a eu l'occasion de présenter ses efforts en matière d'éducation dans les présentations sur l'enseignement des sciences lors du 4e Forum des Nations Unies sur la STI 2019 4th UN STI Forum 2019 les 14 et 15 mai 2019 au siège des Nations Unies à New York et également au Forum politique de haut niveau High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019)  sur le développement durable 2019 (HLPF 2019) le 11 juillet 2019 au siège des Nations Unies dans une session intitulée " Pratiques et approches en matière de qualité dans l'éducation d'environnement et de climat "Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action. En outre, l'équipe a participé à des événements d'éducation climatique à la COP 24 en Pologne et à des conférences et ateliers pour les enseignants et les experts climatiques.

L'initiative du projet TROP ICSU répond parfaitement aux besoins urgents, comme en témoignent les préoccupations croissantes, en particulier chez les jeunes, dans le monde entier, ainsi que les mesures prises par certains pays, comme l'Italie, pour inclure ouvertement le changement climatique dans les programmes scolaires de chaque enfant.

La première phase du projet TROP ICSU (2017-2019) a bénéficié d'une subvention de trois ans du Conseil International de la Science (International Science Council (ISC)).

 

Credits

Translated from English to French by
Prit Pandya, Freelance Translator, Pune, India

Educação sobre Mudança Climática Através do Currículo Através do Mundo:

  1. Mudança Climática é uma das questões mais significantes do nosso tempo.
  2. Afeta o desenvolvimento sustentável e equitativo de todos os países e seus cidadãos.
  3. Soluções requerem que as populações estejam cientes aos seus problemas.
  4. Medidas para atenuar os efeitos das mudanças climáticas envolvem soluções localmente enraizadas, mas que sejam baseadas na ciência global.
  5. A integração da educação sobre mudanças climáticas no sistema de educação formal pode equipar as gerações atuais e futuras com habilidades essenciais para determinar soluções localmente relevantes para adaptação, atenuação e resiliência às mudanças
    climáticas.

O objetivo do projeto TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org) é agregar os tópicos relacionados às mudanças climáticas no currículo básico da escola e da graduação, para aumentar a conscientização sobre as causas e efeitos das mudanças climáticas entre os alunos. O projeto TROP ICSU faz parte da visão de democratização do conhecimento, para que toda a humanidade invista seu talento, habilidades e ambição de maneira focada para lidar com os problemas das mudanças climáticas.

 

O foco principal do projeto é providenciar uma fonte confiável de recursos educacionais validados e com curadoria que integram os tópicos de mudanças climáticas no currículo principal do sistema de ensino formal. Essa abordagem garantirá que todos os estudantes, independentemente de suas disciplinas / áreas de estudo, tomem consciência das causas e impactos das mudanças climáticas e sejam equipados com habilidades para desenvolver soluções locais inovadoras para esse problema global.

Portanto, o projeto TROP ICSU alinha-se diretamente com os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável (ODS) das Nações Unidas para Educação de Qualidade (Objetivo 4) e Ação Climática (Objetivo 13).

Para atingir as metas do projeto, a equipe de implementação do TROP ICSU, sediada no Instituto Indiano de Ensino e Pesquisa em Ciências (IISER), Pune desenvolveu, classificou, selecionou e validou um repositório de recursos de ensino de todo o mundo que pode ser usado por professores para ensinar tópicos específicos da disciplina, usando exemplos, estudos de caso e atividades relacionadas às mudanças climáticas. O projeto demonstrou a nova abordagem pedagógica da integração da educação em mudanças climáticas no currículo existente. Como parte desse projeto, a equipe desenvolveu um grande número de recursos de ensino (alguns com planos de aula detalhados, passo a passo) como prova de conceito na integração de tópicos de mudanças climáticas no núcleo curricular. Uma metodologia detalhada foi adotada para garantir a validade científica e a integração perfeita dos tópicos sobre mudanças climáticas com os tópicos curriculares. Assim, o uso dos recursos educacionais da TROP ICSU ajudará às professoras e professores a melhorar a qualidade da aprendizagem e, ao mesmo tempo, aumentar a conscientização sobre as mudanças climáticas entre os alunos, sem se desviar do currículo principal.

 

Na primeira fase do projeto, a equipe realizou workshops para professores e educadores na Índia, Butão, África do Sul, Uganda, Egito, França, Áustria, Reino Unido, China e Austrália. Nessas oficinas, os educadores locais avaliaram a eficácia dos recursos de ensino. Em alguns locais, especialistas em mudanças climáticas também participaram dos workshops e forneceram feedback. Fortes colaborações em andamento foram estabelecidas com organizações das Nações Unidas, como a UNCC: Learn, a Organização Meteorológica Mundial (OMM) e o Programa Mundial de Pesquisa Climática (WCRP), que não apenas validaram os planos de aula e as ferramentas de ensino, mas também endossaram todo o projeto. A equipe do projeto teve a oportunidade de apresentar seus esforços educacionais nos eventos de Educação Científica durante o 4th UN STI Forum 2019 entre 14-15 de maio de 2019 na sede da ONU em Nova York e também no Fórum Político de Alto Nível sobre Desenvolvimento Sustentável 2019, High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) na sede das Nações Unidas em 11 de julho de 2019, em uma sessão intitulada "Práticas e abordagens sobre educação de qualidade para o meio ambiente e a ação climática"(Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action). Além disso, a equipe participou de eventos de educação climática na COP 24 na Polônia e de conferências e workshops para professores e especialistas em clima.

A iniciativa TROP ICSU é muito oportuna, como é mostrado nos crescentes níveis de preocupação, principalmente entre os jovens, em todo o mundo, juntamente com as iniciativas de alguns países, como a Itália, de incluir abertamente as mudanças climáticas no currículo de todas as crianças.

A primeira fase do projeto TROP ICSU (2017-2019) foi apoiada por uma concessão de três anos do International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

Translated from English to Brazilian Portuguese by:

Translator: Douglas Sena Rodrigues, Unicamp student, SAE Fellowship
Reviewer: PhD Priscila Pereira Coltri, Director of CEPAGRI/Unicamp (Meteo and Climate
Research Center applied to agriculture) https://www.cpa.unicamp.br

 

ಪ್ರಪಂಚದಾದ್ಯಂತದ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಕುರಿತು ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ:

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯು ನಮ್ಮ ಕಾಲದ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಒಂದು.

● ಇದು ಎಲ್ಲಾ ದೇಶಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಅವುಗಳ ನಾಗರಿಕರ ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಮತ್ತು ಸಮಾನ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಮೇಲೆ ಪರಿಣಾಮ
ಬೀರುತ್ತದೆ.

● ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳು ಸಾಧ್ಯವಾಗಬೇಕಾದರೆ, ಜನರಿಗೆ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಯ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಅರಿವಿರಬೇಕು.

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳನ್ನು ತಗ್ಗಿಸುವ ಕ್ರಮಗಳು ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ ನೆಲೆಗಟ್ಟಿನದ್ದಾದರೂ, ಜಾಗತಿಕ
ವಿಜ್ಞಾನವನ್ನು ಆಧರಿಸಿದ ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಒಳಗೊಂಡಿರುತ್ತವೆ.

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆ ಕುರಿತ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣವನ್ನು ಔಪಚಾರಿಕ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವುದರಿಂದ, ಹವಾಮಾನ
ಬದಲಾವಣೆಗೆ ಹೊಂದಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವುದು, ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನು ತಗ್ಗಿಸುವುದು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಕಪಿಮುಷ್ಟಿಯಿಂದ
ಹೊರಬರಲು ಬೇಕಾದ ಸೂಕ್ತ ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಸ್ಥಳೀಯವಾಗಿ ನಿರ್ಧರಿಸಲು, ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತ ಮತ್ತು ಭವಿಷ್ಯದ ಪೀಳಿಗೆಗಳನ್ನು
ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಕೌಶಲ್ಯಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಸಜ್ಜುಗೊಳಿಸಬಹುದು.

ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಹಿಂದಿರುವ ಕಾರಣಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳ ಅರಿವು ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹೆಚ್ಚಿಸುವ
ಸಲುವಾಗಿ TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org/)
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆ-ಸಂಬಂಧಿತ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಶಾಲೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಮತ್ತು ಪದವಿಪೂರ್ವ ಹಂತಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಮೂಲ
ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದೊಳಗೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ಗುರಿಯನ್ನು ಹೊಂದಿದೆ; TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು ಜ್ಞಾನದ
ಪ್ರಜಾಪ್ರಭುತ್ವೀಕರಣದ ಆಶಯ ಹೊಂದಿದ್ದು, ಇದರಿಂದಾಗಿ ಇಡೀ ಮಾನವಕುಲವು ತಮ್ಮ ಪ್ರತಿಭೆ, ಕೌಶಲ್ಯ ಮತ್ತು
ಮಹತ್ವಾಕಾಂಕ್ಷೆಯನ್ನು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳನ್ನು ಪರಿಹರಿಸಲು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಕೃತ ರೀತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹೂಡಿಕೆ
ಮಾಡುತ್ತದೆ.

ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಔಪಚಾರಿಕ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸಲು,
ಅಗತ್ಯವಾಗಿ ಬೇಕಾದ ಪರಿಶೀಲಿತ ಮತ್ತು ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದ ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ವಿಶ್ವಾಸಾರ್ಹ ಮೂಲವನ್ನು ಒದಗಿಸುವುದು,
ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮುಖ್ಯ ಗುರಿಯಾಗಿದೆ. ಯಾವುದೇ ವಿಭಾಗಗಳ / ಅಧ್ಯಯನ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರಗಳ ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಾಗಿದ್ದರೂ, ಅವರೆಲ್ಲರೂ
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಕಾರಣಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಅರಿತು, ಈ ಜಾಗತಿಕ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗೆ ನವೀನ ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ
ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸುವ ಕೌಶಲ್ಯಗಳನ್ನು ತಮ್ಮದಾಗಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವಲ್ಲಿ, ಈ ವಿಧಾನವು ಖಚಿತ ನೆರವು ನೀಡುತ್ತದೆ.
ಹೀಗಾಗಿ, TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು, ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ (ಗುರಿ 4) ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಕ್ರಮ (ಗುರಿ 13)ಕ್ಕಾಗಿ
ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಗುರಿಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ (ಎಸ್‌ಡಿಜಿ) ನೇರವಾಗಿ ಕೈಜೋಡಿಸಿದೆ ಎನ್ನಬಹುದು.

ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಗುರಿಗಳನ್ನು ಸಾಧಿಸಲು, ಪುಣೆಯ ಭಾರತೀಯ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಮತ್ತು ಸಂಶೋಧನಾ ಕೇಂದ್ರದಲ್ಲಿರುವ
(ಐಐಎಸ್ಇಆರ್) TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆ ಅನುಷ್ಠಾನ ತಂಡವು ವಿಶ್ವದಾದ್ಯಂತದ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ
ಭಂಡಾರವನ್ನು ಸಂಗ್ರಹಿಸಿದೆ, ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸಿದೆ, ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸಿದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದೆ. ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಗೆ
ಸಂಬಂಧಿಸಿದ ಉದಾಹರಣೆಗಳು, ಕೇಸ್ ಸ್ಟಡೀಸ್ ಮತ್ತು ಚಟುವಟಿಕೆಗಳನ್ನು ಒಳಗೊಂಡ ಈ ಅನನ್ಯ ಬೋಧನಾ
ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲವನ್ನು ಬಳಸಿ, ಬೋಧನ ಶಾಖೆಗೆ-ನಿರ್ದಿಷ್ಟವಾದ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಕಲಿಸಲು ಸಾಧ್ಯವಾಗುತ್ತದೆ. ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯು
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣವನ್ನು ಈಗಾಗಲೇ ಅಸ್ತಿತ್ವದಲ್ಲಿರುವ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ವಿನೂತನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ
ವಿಧಾನವನ್ನು ಪ್ರದರ್ಶಿಸಿದೆ. ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಭಾಗವಾಗಿ, ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ
ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ಪರಿಕಲ್ಪನೆಯ ಪುರಾವೆಯಾಗಿ, ಹೆಚ್ಚಿನ ಸಂಖ್ಯೆಯ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳನ್ನು(ಕೆಲವು ವಿವರವಾದ, ಹಂತ-
ಹಂತದ ಪಾಠ ಯೋಜನೆಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ) ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸಿದೆ . ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದ ವಿಷಯಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ
ವಿಷಯಗಳ ವೈಜ್ಞಾನಿಕ ಸಿಂಧುತ್ವ ಮತ್ತು ತಡೆರಹಿತ ಏಕೀಕರಣವನ್ನು ಖಚಿತಪಡಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳಲು, ವಿವರವಾದ ವಿಧಾನವನ್ನು

ಅಳವಡಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ TROP ICSU ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ಬಳಕೆಯು, ಕಲಿಕೆಯ ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟವನ್ನು ಸುಧಾರಿಸಲು
ಸಹಾಯ ಮಾಡುತ್ತದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಮೂಲ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಿಂದ ವಿಚಲನಗೊಳ್ಳದೇ ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ
ಜಾಗೃತಿಯನ್ನು ಹೆಚ್ಚಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.

ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮೊದಲ ಹಂತದಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾರತ, ಭೂತಾನ್, ದಕ್ಷಿಣ ಆಫ್ರಿಕಾ, ಉಗಾಂಡಾ, ಈಜಿಪ್ಟ್, ಫ್ರಾನ್ಸ್, ಆಸ್ಟ್ರಿಯಾ, ಯುಕೆ,
ಚೀನಾ ಮತ್ತು ಆಸ್ಟ್ರೇಲಿಯಾದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಕರಿಗೆ ಈ ತಂಡವು ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳನ್ನು ನಡೆಸಿದೆ. ಈ ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ
ಶಿಕ್ಷಣತಜ್ಞರು ಈ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ಪರಿಣಾಮಕಾರಿತ್ವವನ್ನು ಮೌಲ್ಯಮಾಪನ ಮಾಡಿದರು. ಕೆಲವು ಸ್ಥಳಗಳಲ್ಲಿ,
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ತಜ್ಞರು ಸಹ ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಿಗೆ ಹಾಜರಾಗಿ, ತಮ್ಮ ಪ್ರತಿಕ್ರಿಯೆಯನ್ನು ನೀಡಿದರು. ಯುಎನ್‌ಸಿಸಿ:
ಲರ್ನ್, ವಿಶ್ವ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆ (ಡಬ್ಲ್ಯುಎಂಒ), ಮತ್ತು ವಿಶ್ವ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಸಂಶೋಧನಾ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮ
(ಡಬ್ಲ್ಯುಸಿಆರ್‌ಪಿ)ದಂತಹ ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಬಲವಾದ ಸಹಯೋಗವನ್ನು ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮುಖಾಂತರ
ಸ್ಥಾಪಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಆ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳ ಪ್ರತಿನಿಧಿಗಳು ಈ ಪಾಠ ಯೋಜನೆಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಾಧನಗಳನ್ನು
ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದ್ದಾರೆ, ಜೊತೆಗೆ, ಈ ಸಂಪೂರ್ಣ ಯೋಜನೆಗೆ ಅನುಮೋದನೆ ನೀಡಿದ್ದಾರೆ.

ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ತಮ್ಮ
ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಪ್ರಯತ್ನಗಳನ್ನು ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತಪಡಿಸಲು ಈ ಯೋಜನಾ ತಂಡಕ್ಕೆ ಅವಕಾಶವಿದ್ದು, 2019 ಮೇ 14-15ರಂದು
ನ್ಯೂಯಾರ್ಕ್‌ನ ಯುಎನ್ ಕೇಂದ್ರ ಕಚೇರಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ನಡೆದ “4 ನೇ ಯುಎನ್ ಎಸ್‌ಟಿಐ ಫೋರಂ 2019” ರ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿ ಮತ್ತು
ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಪ್ರಧಾನ ಕಚೇರಿಯಲ್ಲಿ 2019 ಜುಲೈ 11 ರಂದು “ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಬಗೆಗಿನ ಉನ್ನತ ಮಟ್ಟದ
ರಾಜಕೀಯ ವೇದಿಕೆ - 2019” (ಎಚ್‌ಎಲ್‌ಪಿಎಫ್) ಎಂಬ ವಿಶೇಷ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿ "ಪರಿಸರ ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಕ್ರಮದ
ಕಡೆಗೆ ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣಕ್ಕೆ ಬೇಕಾದ ಪರಿಪಾಠಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ವಿಧಾನಗಳು" ಎಂಬ ಅಧಿವೇಶನದಲ್ಲಿಈ ತಂಡವು ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತ
ಪಡಿಸಿತು. ಇದಲ್ಲದೆ, ಈ ತಂಡವು ಪೋಲೆಂಡ್‌ನ ಸಿಒಪಿ 24 ರಲ್ಲಿ ನಡೆದ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹಾಗೂ
ಶಿಕ್ಷಕರು ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ತಜ್ಞರ ಸಮಾವೇಶಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾಗವಹಿಸಿದೆ.

TROP ICSU ಉಪಕ್ರಮವು ಬಹಳ ಸಮಯೋಚಿತವಾಗಿದ್ದು, ಪ್ರಪಂಚದಾದ್ಯಂತ, ವಿಶೇಷವಾಗಿ ಯುವಜನರಲ್ಲಿ, ಪರಿಸರ
ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಹೆಚ್ಚುತ್ತಿರುವ ಕಾಳಜಿ, ಮತ್ತು ಇಟಲಿಯಂತಹ ಕೆಲವು ದೇಶಗಳು ಪ್ರತಿ ಮಗುವಿನ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ
ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನು ಬಹಿರಂಗವಾಗಿ ಸೇರಿಸಲು ಪ್ರಯತ್ನ ನಡೆಸಿರುವ ಕ್ರಮಗಳನ್ನು ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯು ಪ್ರತಿಧ್ವನಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.
TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮೊದಲ ಹಂತವನ್ನು (2017-2019) ಅಂತರಾಷ್ಟ್ರೀಯ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಮಂಡಳಿಯ (ISC) ಮೂರು
ವರ್ಷಗಳ ಅನುದಾನದಿಂದ ಬೆಂಬಲಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ.

Credits

Translated from English to Kannada by:

1. TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

2. Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

3. Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

As a High School or Undergraduate Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about landfills and landfill gas emissions and their impact on climate.

Municipal solid waste ends up in landfills across the globe. Over time, with the decomposition of the solid waste, these landfills emit various gases such as methane, with greenhouse warming potentials. This lesson plan will describe landfills in detail and how landfill gases could contribute towards climate change. This lesson plan will also discuss how methane from landfills can be collected and used as fuel, thereby mitigating its effect on the climate.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Mudau Lutendo S., Ms Kasturie Premlall and Ms Masethe Mosima A., Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image: Landfills as one of the sources of GHG emission

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is municipal solid waste and what is it composed of? Classify the different categories of municipal waste.
  1. Explain what landfills are and list the pollutant gases that are produced in a landfill.
  1. Describe how landfills can potentially contribute towards climate change.
  1. How much does your country’s waste contribute to methane gas emissions?
  1. Discuss how landfill gases can be processed to mitigate climate change.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate,High school
Discipline Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Municipal Solid Waste, Industrial Waste, Hazardous Waste, Landfills, Leachate, Landfill Gases (LFGs), Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Methane
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere, The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Location Global, USA, South Africa
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40 – 50 min

Contents

Video

(~2 min)

A brief introduction to solid waste and landfills.

Go to the Video

Reading

(20 min)

A reading to describe in detail the different types of landfills and their compositions.

Go to the Reading

Reading (10 min) A reading to describe landfill gases (LFGs), with emphasis on methane, a significant greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites.

Go to the Reading

Visualization

(10 min)

An interactive visualization of sector-wise (including the waste sector) methane emissions in different countries.

Go to the Visualization

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Play the video, ‘A video about landfills’ by Meggie Stewart, Emory University, to introduce your students to the topic of landfills.
  2. Use the video to acquaint them with the basics of what municipal solid waste is, how it ends up in landfills, and what happens to it over time as it decomposes.
  3. Further, explain why methane is produced and emitted from landfills.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Discuss the topic of landfills in detail

  1. Use the reading, ‘Basic Information about Landfills’ by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss landfills and their different types in detail.
  2. Use the embedded links in text to discuss how landfills are classified according to the waste stored in them.
  3. Distinguish between Municipal Solid Waste Landfills, non-hazardous Industrial Waste Landfills, and Hazardous Waste Landfills.
  4. Elaborate upon Bioreactor Landfills that store organic matter and discuss the formation of leachate and landfill gases (LFGs) in them.
  5. Explain that landfill gases mainly comprise of greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide and that their emission from landfill sites can contribute significantly to climate change.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 3: Extend the understanding about landfill gases

  1. Use the reading, ‘Basic Information about Landfill Gas’ by the Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP)- EPA, to discuss the typical composition of landfill gases.
  2. Use the text and the embedded ‘diagram that illustrates the changes in typical LFG composition after waste placement’ to explain the formation of LFGs due to bacterial decomposition of organic matter in the landfills.
  3. Elaborate on how methane is produced from landfills and why its release to the atmosphere can adversely affect climate.
  4. Explain why methane is the more potent greenhouse gas compared to carbon dioxide.
  5. Use the text to explain how landfill gases can be used productively, thereby limiting greenhouse gas emissions from landfills and to mitigate their effect on the climate.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 4 : Interactive Visualization to explore the local context

  1. Use the interactive visualization, ‘Methane emissions by sector’ by Our World in Data, to discuss total and relative methane emissions for different countries and regions, from various sectors such as Agriculture, Land Use, and Waste.
  2. Use the bottom left tabs on the chart, to select for a country or region to visualize its sector-wise breakdown of methane emissions.
  3. The data for the displayed chart is also available to download as a CSV file.
  4. Use this visualization and/or data to comment on your country or region’s contribution to methane emissions from the Waste sector and therefore, its potential effect on climate change.

Go to the Visualization

As an undergraduate Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the principle of thermodynamics and about thermodynamic processes.

A fundamental notion in Thermodynamics is a ‘Thermodynamic System’. A thermodynamic system is a part of the universe that is under study; the rest of the universe is considered the ‘environment’ for this system. The separation between the system and the environment may be real (like a wall) or imaginary. Every thermodynamic system has certain measurable quantities called state variables such as pressure, volume, temperature, density, internal energy, entropy, and enthalpy. In this lesson plan, students will learn about thermodynamics processes and their examples in the atmosphere that determine the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere.

This lesson plan will also describe how the thermodynamic stability of the atmosphere changes and how adiabatic processes affect cloud formation, a component of climate. It also includes an interactive simulation tool to enable students to explore the different types of thermodynamic processes in a gaseous system. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image: A thermodynamic diagram showing the stability of the atmosphere based on the dry (Γd = 9.8 K km-1) and moist (Γ= 4.5 K km-1) adiabatic lapse rates (Created by Britt Seifert).

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a thermodynamic system?
  2. What are the thermodynamic state variables?
  3. Describe the different kinds of thermodynamic processes.
  4. Explain how atmospheric stability and cloud formation are affected by thermodynamic adiabatic processes.

Image: Vertical structure of the atmophere

 

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Thermodynamics, Thermodynamic Systems, Thermodynamic Processes- Isothermic

Isobaric, Isovolumetric, and Adiabatic, Lapse Rates.

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline, An interactive tool available in several languages
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(~20 min)

 

A reading that introduces various thermodynamic processes and provides a few exercises to understand them.

Go to the Reading

Video

(11 min)

A video lecture that explains how adiabatic processes and lapse rates determine the stability of the atmosphere and in turn, influence cloud formation.

Go to the Video

Simulation (20 min) An interactive simulation to explore thermodynamic processes in a gaseous system. This tool is available in several languages.

Go to the Simulation

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘First Law of Thermodynamics and some Simple Processes’ by OpenStaxCollege, BCCampus Open Education, to introduce your students to common thermodynamic processes like isobaric, isovolumetric (or isochoric), isothermal and adiabatic processes.
  2. Thermodynamic processes are representation of the change of the state variables of a system. They are usually plotted using any two state variables as the x and y axes.
  3. The most commonly used plot is the P-V diagram, where Pressure and Volume are the two axes. However, any two thermodynamic state variables can be used as axes in a ‘Thermodynamic diagram’.
  4. Use the examples given in text to enable your students to understand these processes and their variables better.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Extend understanding using the example of atmospheric thermodynamic processes

  1. In atmospheric sciences, the basic thermodynamic system studied is called the ‘air parcel’. As the name suggests, it is simply a volume of air with an imaginary boundary which separates it from the rest of the atmosphere.
  2. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is usually faster than the rate at which the air parcel can exchange heat with the surrounding air (environment).
  3. Therefore, most vertical motion in the atmosphere is approximately adiabatic. Using this approximation, we can estimate how much the air parcel cools as it rises in the atmosphere- known as the ‘atmospheric lapse rate’.
  4. Use the video, ‘Adiabatic Processes, Lapse Rates and Rising Air’ by Stephan Becker, Lehman College CUNY to explain the lapse rate in the atmosphere.
  5. Emphasize to your students how this is changed in the absence or presence of water vapour and thereby, affects condensation and cloud formation.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity

  1. Use the interactive PhET simulation, ‘Gas Properties’ by University of Colorado Boulder to enable your students to explore the different state variables for a given gaseous system. This tool is available in several languages.
  2. Instruct your students to use the simulation to create scenarios for different thermodynamic processes ie. Isothermic, isobaric, isovolumetric or adiabatic.
  3. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘Thermodynamics and P-V Diagrams’ by Paul Andersen, Bozeman Science as a guide for design and analysis of your customized classroom activity to explain thermodynamic processes involved in this simulation.

Go to The PhET simulation

Go to the Bozeman Science micro-lecture

As a Middle School or High School Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the Greenhouse Effect of the Earth’s atmosphere. This lesson plan will explain what are Greenhouse Gases (GHGs), what is the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of atmospheric Greenhouse
Gases, and how increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can cause global warming of the planet.

The Earth’s atmosphere is made up of several gases. It allows incoming solar radiation to enter and warm the Earth’s surface which then radiates energy back into space. Some gases in the atmosphere absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation and re-radiate it back to the Earth, thereby increasing Earth’s
surface temperature. These gases are called Greenhouse Gases and this warming is known as the Greenhouse Effect. Important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), water vapor (H 2 O), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O). Since the beginning of the industrial age,
increased greenhouse gas emissions have potentially led to global warming of the planet. This lesson plan includes reading and activity-based resources to teach your students about the Greenhouse Effect, Global Warming and the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of atmospheric Greenhouse Gases.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences or Chemistry.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the Greenhouse Effect of the Earth’s atmosphere?
  2. What are Greenhouse Gases?
  3. Explain the role of Greenhouse Gases in causing global warming.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle School or High School
Discipline Environmental Sciences, Chemistry
Topic(s) in Discipline Greenhouse Effect, Greenhouse Gases (GHGs), Greenhouse Gas Emissions,

Global Warming, Global Warming Potential (GWP)

Climate Topic The Greenhouse Effect, Introduction to Climate Change
Location Global
Language(s) English, one resource also available in  various languages
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 min

Contents

Reading

(30 min)

A reading that introduces the greenhouse effect, explains
what greenhouse gases are and describes their role in
causing global warming. It includes in-section questions,
discussion points and suggested activities for extending
students’ understanding of the topic. This document is
available to download in English, French, German, and
Spanish.
This can be accessed at:
Go to the Reading

(pages 7-9)

Simulation

(30 min)

An interactive simulation to explore the role of different
greenhouse gases and their atmospheric concentrations in
causing the greenhouse effect. This resource is available in
several languages including English, French, German, and
Spanish.

Go to the Simulation

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the section, ‘A. Understanding global warming’, pages 7-9 of the document, ‘IPCC Special Report “Global Warming of 1.5 0 C”- Summary for Teachers’ by the Office for Climate Education (OCE), France, to introduce your students to the topic of greenhouse gases and the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere.
  2. Discuss how the industrial revolution has resulted in an increase in the concentration of some GHGs in the atmosphere.
  3. Use the in-section questions and tasks to discuss the global warming potential of various GHGs.
  4. Further, use the document to emphasize how an increase in the atmospheric concentrations of such gases has potentially caused global warming of the planet.
  5. This document is available in English, French, German, and Spanish.

Go to the Reading (Page 7-9)

 

Step 2: Extend student understanding of the topic using an interactive simulation

  1. Use the interactive PhET simulation, ‘The Greenhouse Effect’ by University of Colorado, Boulder, to enable your students to visualize the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere.
  2. Use the simulation to show students how certain gases in the atmosphere absorb outgoing terrestrial radiation and re-radiate the energy back to Earth’s surface.Emphasize that this is the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere and increased concentration of these gases causes warming of the Earth’s surface.Instruct your students to explore different scenarios such as ‘Ice Age’, ‘1750’ (pre-Industrial Age) and ‘Today’ to visualize the effect of corresponding concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases on observed temperatures.
  3. Direct your students to adjust the concentration of different greenhouse gases and to note the corresponding surface temperatures of the planet.
  4. You may also use the ‘Photon Absorption’ tab in the simulation to help your students visualize the interaction of infrared radiation with different greenhouse gas molecules.
  5. This resource is available in several languages including English, French, German, and Spanish.

Go to the Simulation

Series of two E-Learning Courses on Introduction to Climate Change and Climate Science

Following are two online courses in Climate Change and Climate Science by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

The courses are multidisciplinary in the approach and include the current state of understanding of climate science and climate change, the latest developments in the field, societal impacts of climate change, climate change policies and governance, and impacts of climate change.

The online course video playlist includes:

· Introduction to Climate Science and Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Archives, Climate Data, and Climate Models (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Change: Past Records: Climate Change on Tectonic Timescales, Orbital Timescales, Glacial/Deglacial Timescales, Millenial Timescales, Historical Timescales (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Modern Climate Change: Global Warming since the Industrial Revolution (Raghu Murtugudde)
· Future Projections of Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Mitigation and Adaptation (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland and Malti Goel, Climate Change Research Institute)
· Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics (D. Parthasarathy, IIT Bombay)
· Climate Change Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making (Navroz Dubash, Centre for Policy Research)
· Climate Change: Impacts in India (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Change and Impacts on

(a) The Indian Monsoon (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)

(b) Water Resources (Pradeep Mujumdar, IISc Bengaluru)

(c) Biodiversity and Ecology (Deepak Barua, IISER Pune)

(d) The Himalayan Glaciers (Argha Banerjee, IISER Pune)

· Teaching Resources and Pedagogical Tools (Rahul Chopra, IISER Pune)

Tool Name Introduction to Climate Change Course
Discipline All Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Different aspects of climate change
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Type of Tool E-learning Course
Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India
Hosted at IISER Pune Science Media Center YouTube Channel
Link Course 1: Science of climate change, mitigation, adaptation and resilience

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZbgNdSTyWDbHe1onWK9SULbPxCuAMi1Z

Course 2: Integration of climate change topics with the core curriculum

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZbgNdSTyWDafbfITIuKAxkk7CdiXk9Y9

Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Course 1: Introduction to Climate Change

Course 2: Introduction to Climate Change and Climate Science

As a High School or Undergraduate Economics or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as outlined by the United Nations for nations to adopt and work towards, for a sustainable future.

This lesson plan will allow you to introduce the SDGs to your students, stress on their socio-economic importance and enable discussions on the efforts taken by governmental and non-governmental agencies of their nations towards achieving these goals. This lesson plan will also draw attention to how climate change may affect the efforts towards achieving the SDGs.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics or Social Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?
  2. What are your nation’s efforts towards meeting the SDGs?
  3. How is climate change intricately linked with sustainable development and the achievement of the SDGs?

SDG Dashboard

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Sustainability
Development Economics, Urban Economics
Environmental Economics, Inclusive Society
Inequality, Societal Resilience, Poverty
Well Being, Justice, Gender Equality, and Climate Action
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Location Global
Language(s) English, A tool also available in French, German and Spanish
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Video

(~2 min)

A video to introduce sustainable development and the UN defined Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Go to the Video

Teaching Module (allocated time will vary according to the topic/s under consideration) A teaching module to teach the individual SDGs in detail, as per the topic in curriculum.

Go to the Resource

Teaching Module

(~35 min)

A summary of an IPCC report on global warming and a list of classroom tasks to emphasize the link between climate change and sustainable development. This reading is also available in French, German and Spanish.

Go to the Resource (pages 20-21)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Use the video, ‘What is sustainable development?’ by the United Nations (UN) to describe to your students, what sustainable development is and to define the different sustainable development goals (SDGs) as outlined by the UN.

Go to the video, ‘What is sustainable development?

 

Step 2: Develop the topic further

  1. Use the reading, ‘Sustainable Foundations- A Guide for Teaching the Sustainable Development Goals’ by the Manitoba Council for International Cooperation (MCIC), for a detailed study of the individual SDGs and to highlight to your students the socio-economic importance of each one.
  2. Use the first 6 pages of the text as a user guide to this document and to note the points to highlight while teaching the SDGs.
  3. Then, select one or more SDGs for consideration and navigate to the relevant pages to teach about them in detail.
  4. Use the ‘Reflection and Action Questions’ within each section to assess student understanding and/or to encourage classroom discussion.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Emphasize the link between climate change and the achievement of the SDGs

  • Use the reading, ‘IPCC Special Report: Global Warming of 1.50 Summary for Teachers’ (pages 20-21) by Office for Climate Education (OCE), France, to explain to your students the link between global warming and attaining the SDGs. This reading is also available in French, German and Spanish.
  • Use the text to discuss with your students the relationship between population, economic growth and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
  • Explain to your students climate change exacerbates poverty and in turn, a higher rate of population growth and the associated inequalities contribute greatly to global warming through increased GHG emissions.
  • Use the text to emphasize to your students that climate change can be detrimental for sustainable development, especially in developing countries and vulnerable regions.
  • Therefore, discuss how SDGs must be addressed in conjunction with the efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change.
  • Finally, use the list of tasks on page 21, to encourage your students to discuss their country’s efforts towards addressing the SDGs in the context of climate change.

Go to the Resource (pages 20-21)

As a High School or Undergraduate Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and Simple Harmonic Oscillators.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach your students about Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and simple harmonic oscillators and engage them in a hands-on activity to explore these concepts. Simple harmonic oscillations, that occur in stratified fluids due to the Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy, can affect the flow of energy within large scale systems such as the Earth’s atmosphere and the oceans by the displacement of parcels of air/water. This lesson plan will thus, explain how natural oscillations in the atmosphere/oceans with the Brunt–Väisälä frequency affect cloud formation, occurrence of thunderstorms, and internal waves within oceans and thus, affect the climate.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM)?
  2. What are simple harmonic oscillators? Discuss an example.
  3. What is the Brunt–Väisälä frequency and how can it be used to predict cloud formations and the occurrence of thunderstorms?
  4. How can simple harmonic oscillations in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans be responsible for influencing the climate?

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image to the Left : Simple Harmonic Motion

Image to the Right: Simple Harmonic Oscillations

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM), Simple Harmonic Oscillators

Brunt–Väisälä Frequency, Archimedes’ Principle of Buoyancy in Fluids, Stratified Fluids, Density Gradient

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere, Climate and the Hydrosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(~25 min)

 

An introduction to simple harmonic motion and simple harmonic oscillators.

Go to the Reading

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A hands-on laboratory activity (Dancing Test Tubes) to demonstrate simple harmonic oscillation in a stratified fluid.
Video micro-lecture

(~4.5 min)

A video micro-lecture that describes how oscillations with the Brunt–Väisälä frequency in the atmosphere and oceans cause many natural phenomena that can influence Earth’s climate.

This can be accessed at:

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘Simple Harmonic Motion’ by LibreTextsTM to introduce the concept of Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and its characteristics.
  2. Use the text to define terms such as period, frequency, amplitude and equilibrium in oscillations and to describe a simple harmonic oscillator.
  3. Introduce the concept of non-uniform force directed towards the resting position of an object using the simple system of an object tied to a spring tethered to a wall.
  4. Explain that when you pull the object, there is a force acting on it which pulls it towards its resting position and if you then release the object, it will accelerate towards its resting position.
  5. Discuss how the object oscillates in SHM around its equilibrium position with the opposing forces acting on it.
  6. Use the text and a solved example to also discuss the equations of motion for the SHM.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity to demonstrate Simple Harmonic Motion in stratified fluids- Dancing Test Tubes Experiment

Use this suggested activity to allow your students to visualize how a parcel of water/air can perform SHM in the presence of a density gradient.

  1. Take a large beaker (volume ~4 liters).
  2. Fill it with 2 liters of regular water.
  3. Prepare a saturated salt solution by dissolving ~0.5 kg of table salt in another container with 2 liters of regular water.
  4. Dip a glass rod into the beaker.
  5. Pour the saturated salt solution along the glass rod into the beaker. This is done so that the salt solution reaches the bottom of the beaker with minimal mixing with the regular water
  6. Now the beaker contains the heavier salty water at the bottom and the lighter regular water at the top.
  7. Fill 2-3 test tubes with regular water. Leave ~10% of the test tube volume unfilled.
  8. Invert the test tubes and insert them into the large beaker. They should sink to the bottom of the beaker. They should also have a small air bubble.
  9. Adjust the unfilled amounts in the test tubes so that all the test tubes do not sink to the bottom.
  10. Heat the beaker using a hot plate.
  11. After some time, the test tubes start oscillating within the beaker.

Classroom discussion:

  1. Ask your students to recall Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy of fluids- the force acting on an object immersed in water is equal to the weight of the water displaced by the object. Explain to the students that this principle works in any fluid -air, water, and lava.
  2. Ask students how the weight of water can be changed by adding salts, by heating/cooling. Explain that as ocean water is saltier at the bottom than at the top, it is heavier at the deeper levels than near the surface of the oceans.
  3. Therefore, if you move a small ‘parcel’ of water to the top from the bottom it will be heavier and sink. Similarly, if you move a parcel of water from the top to the bottom, it will be lighter and rise.
  4. Explain that this sets the stage for simple harmonic motion – a force that is always acting in the opposite direction of the displacement.
  5. Remind the students that initially in the lab activity, the test tube filled with regular water is heavy enough to sink to the bottom. As the beaker is heated, the test tube also gets heated and the air expands just enough to make them lighter than the salty water around them. The test tube then rises until it reaches the regular water near the top. The test tube is now denser than the water surrounding it, and it starts sinking.
  6. Explain to your students that the test tubes represent water or air ‘parcels’ in the ocean and atmosphere. In this experiment, the test tubes are displaced by heating the beaker and they begin to oscillate. This is analogous to the displacement of water or air parcels in Earth’s oceans and the atmosphere.
  7. Discuss how such a displacement can generate internal waves that result in the redistribution of energy within these systems.

 

Step 3: Extend the understanding of the role of SHM in redistribution of energy within Earth’s atmosphere and oceans.

  1. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘What causes stripey clouds?’ by Professor Mike Merrifield, University of Nottingham, to explain how SHM in the atmosphere cause cloud patterns, cloud formations and results in thunderstorms. The air close to the earth’s surface is denser than the air higher above - the reason why it is harder to breathe in the mountains. When parcels of air are displaced from their original position (maybe due to the presence of an obstacle like a mountain), they oscillate up and down. When they move upward, they become cooler and when they move downward, they heat up. If an upward moving air parcel contains water vapour, this water vapour condenses and forms clouds. The downward moving air heats up and does not form clouds. This forms a wave-like pattern of clouds that are visible quite often in the sky.
  2. Use the video to describe the Brunt–Väisälä frequency in SHM. The oscillation of air/water parcels depends on the rate of change of density with height and acceleration due to gravity. If the density decreases with height, the force always points to the position of rest and parcels exhibit SHM. If the density decreases rapidly, the oscillation is faster (can you explain why?) and vice versa. This frequency of oscillation is called the Brunt–Väisälä Frequency. In such a situation, the atmosphere is said to be stable. If the density increases with height, then the parcel always experiences a force upward. In this case, no SHM is possible and the atmosphere is unstable. In such a situation cloud formation and thunderstorms occur.
  3. Use this video to describe similar occurrences of SHM in the oceans where energy is obtained from the coasts, at the surface and from the ocean floor. Since the ocean is stratified, some of this energy is converted to SHM of water parcels. The energy contained in these movements results in the generation of internal waves that transport this energy to other parts of the ocean. These internal waves also transport plankton larvae from the deep ocean to the coasts.
  4. Conclude with a discussion on how such a redistribution of energy within Earth’s atmosphere and oceans, can impact its climate.

Go the Video What causes stripey clouds?

As a High School and Undergraduate Humanities teacher in English, you can use this lesson plan to teach literary analysis of a novel (climate fiction).

The recently recognized literary genre of ‘Cli-Fi’ is a valuable means by which students can engage with key concepts of climate change and sustainability. Such texts allow for rich interdisciplinary approaches to learning about the human impacts on the natural environment. This introductory lesson is intended to be part of a senior high school unit of 5-6 weeks, focused on the teaching of the Australian novel ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).

The story, focused on the experiences of the central character Laura, spans a period from 1984 to 2018; a time in which south eastern Australia experiences significant environmental events- floods, bushfires, drought-closely related to extreme weather events linked to climate change. While central themes in the novel relate more to family relationships, indigenous connection to land and personal identity, the impact of climate change on the natural and built environment in this region of Australia is a constant ‘character’.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Literature.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate fiction (Cli-Fi)?
  2. The literary analysis of a climate fiction novel.
  3. In the novel ‘Anchor Point’, how is climate change portrayed as a character.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Bernie McInerney and Emily Haegi, St Mary’s College, Adelaide, Australia.
Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline English Literature, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Literary Analysis, Character Development

Setting as Character, Creation of Place through Writing

Writing across Time, Visual Representation of the Structure

Climate Fiction

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
45 min + 4-5 class periods

Contents

Reading

(~30 min)

 

An introduction to the guidelines for reading and analyzing a novel.

Go to the Reading

Video (2.5 min) A video to introduce climate fiction as a literary genre.

Go to the Video

Reading and Discussion

(4-5 class periods)

The literary analysis of a Cli-Fi novel- Anchor Point.

Note: This activity requires the procurement of the book, ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).

An audio file of the author’s introduction of the novel can be accessed here: (12.5 min)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this comprehensive guide, ‘Analyzing Literature: A Guide for Students’ by Sharon James McGee, Kansas State University- Salina, to teach your students how to read and analyze a literary text.
  2. Use pages 1-6 of the guide to give your students an overview of how to read a literary text including ‘Strategies for Reading a Work of Literature’ and understanding the ‘Terms for Analyzing Literature’.
  3. Use pages 22-24 to explain to your students how to write a literary analysis of a novel.
    1. Use the given exercises in the section, ‘Exploring Your Topic’ as classroom discussion points and/or as topics for writing exercises during the literary analysis of the novel.
    2. Use the sections, ‘Cultural and Historical Perspectives’ and ‘Other Perspectives for Analyzing Literature’ for explaining the different perspectives in which a literary text can be viewed or analyzed.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Introduction to Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi)

Play the video, ‘What is Cli-Fi?’ by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, to explain to your students this new genre of writing- climate fiction (Cli-Fi) which is going to be the subject of literary analysis in this lesson plan.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3 : Reading and Discussion

(Note: This activity requires the procurement of the book, ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).)

  1. Introduce a Cli-Fi novel to your students by playing the audio interview of the author of the Cli-Fi novel, ‘Anchor Point’, Alice Robinson by Kate Evans and presented by Michael Cathcart (ABC Radio National). Use this tool to encourage your students to form initial ideas about the book and to bring focus on the characters involved and the setting for the novel.
  2. The audio interview and associated write-up, ‘Alice Robinson’s Anchor Point’ can be accessed here.
  3. Ask your students to read the book as a take-home assignment.

Class discussion of the book:

  1. In your discussion of ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson, focus on the experiences of the central character Laura that spans a period from 1984 to 2018; a time in which south eastern Australia experiences significant environmental events. These include floods, bushfires, drought which are related to extreme weather events linked to climate change.
  2. Stress in your discussions that while the central themes in the novel relate more to family relationships, indigenous connections to land and personal identity, the impact of climate change on the natural and built environment in this region of Australia is a constant ‘character’.
  1. Direct your students to do a literary analysis of the novel. Remind your students of the guidelines to do this as discussed before (in the first resource).
    1. Direct your students to use these guidelines to explore different aspects of the novel such as character development, setting as character, creation of a place through writing, writing across time, visual representation of the structure, and as an example of climate fiction.
    2. Discuss how ‘climate change’ is treated as a character in this novel. Finally, comment on how this Cli-Fi novel is a form of climate change communication.

As a High School or Undergraduate teacher of History or Social Sciences, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about civilizations, decline of civilizations or empires, and societal vulnerability to climate-related extreme events.

This lesson plan will help students to learn about Angkor and the Khmer empire—its history, the geographical boundaries, various rulers, the architecture and structures built during the period, culture (including religion and festivities), and possible reasons for the decline and demise of the empire, including climate-related extreme events. The activities will also help students to use 360 degree visualizations while learning about the significance of water and water systems in the life of the Khmer people.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in History or Social Sciences.

Want to know about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? Contact us.

A map illustrating in red the Khmer Empire c. 900 CE.

Angkor Wat Temple

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Describe the reign of Suryavarman II in the Khmer empire. What were his key accomplishments?
  2. Discuss the role of water and water management systems in the life of the Khmer people.
  3. What were the possible reasons for the decline and eventual collapse of the Khmer empire?
  4. Discuss the climate-related extreme events that may have played a significant role in the demise of the Khmer empire.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences, History, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Civilizations, Angkor, Khmer Civilization

Khmer Empire, Urban Design, Water Systems

Water Management Systems

Demise of Civilizations, Decline of Civilizations

Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards, Climate Vulnerability
Location Cambodia, Asia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
75 min

Contents

Reading

(~10 min)

An introductory reading that provides an overview of the Khmer empire – its establishment, the rulers, the religions, the people, and the culture. It also describes the significance of Angkor, the construction and architecture of various monuments and structures, and the decline and collapse of the empire.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~20 min)

A more detailed reading describing the foundation of the kingdom, the Angkorean civilization (including information about the various rulers, the magnificent structures built, and conflicts with enemies), the long reign of Jayavarman VII, and a discussion on the reasons that led to the decline of Angkor.

Go to the Reading

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(45 min)

 

A classroom/laboratory activity that uses 360 degree visualizations, readings, and a map to explore Angkor virtually and to learn about the important role of water and water systems (canals, reservoirs, and tanks) in the Khmer empire. The three-part activity concludes with a discussion on the climate vulnerability of Angkor and climate variation as one of the causes of the downfall of the Khmer empire.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading “Khmer Empire” from the Ancient History Encyclopedia to provide an introduction to the Khmer Empire.
  2. Use the map to observe the geographical location and boundaries of the empire and discuss its modern-day equivalent location.
  3. Proceed to a discussion on the main rulers of the kingdom and their contribution.
  4. Provide an overview of the cultural and religious aspects, and conclude with information about the time period and events that led to the decline of the Khmer Empire.

Go to the Reading

Step 2: Detailed discussion on the topic

  1. Use the reading “The Khmer state (Angkor)” from the Encyclopaedia Britannica for a more detailed discussion on Angkor and the Khmer Empire.
  2. Begin the discussion with the Foundation of the kingdom and the perceived role and importance of the rulers.
  3. Read about the Angkorean civilization; further, discuss the reigns of various rulers (including Jayavarman VII), the cities that were chosen as capitals over the years, and the magnificent monuments and structures built in the kingdom (including the Angkor Wat temple complex).
  4. Read about and discuss the gradual decline of Angkor and the various reasons that could be attributed to this downfall.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 3 : Further exploration using a hands-on activity (Go to the Activity)

Use the teaching module “Water & Climate” from Virtual Angkor to help your students explore the history of Angkor and the Khmer Empire in a hands-on, interactive manner and to learn about how climate-related factors may have played a crucial role in the decline of this empire.

First, navigate to Theme One (Living with Water) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Ask students to play the video and to explore the 360 degree views to learn about the role of water in the Khmer people’s lives.
  3. Facilitate a discussion on Questions 1., 2., and 3. of this module.

Next, navigate to Theme Two (The Hydraulic City) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water-t2.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Ask students to play the video and to explore the 360 degree views to visualize the rice fields and irrigation system in Angkor.
  3. Ask students to study the map.
  4. Facilitate a discussion on Questions 1. and 4. to learn about the water and water features in Angkor, and the significance of water in the Khmer empire.

Then, navigate to Theme Three (Climate Vulnerability) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water-t3.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Navigate to the article “Climate as a contributing factor in the demise of Angkor, Cambodia” listed in this module (https://www.pnas.org/content/107/15/6748). Encourage students to read the section, “Climate and Societal Vulnerability at Angkor”.
  3. Facilitate a discussion on the water management system in Angkor, the barays, and the modifications to the water management infrastructure. Discuss the role of climate-related extreme events (droughts and floods) in the downfall of the Khmer empire.

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School or Undergraduate French language teacher or a teacher of French as a second language (intermediate or advanced level), you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach climate change-related French vocabulary through reading comprehension and listening comprehension exercises.

This lesson plan will allow students of the French language to enhance their reading comprehension and listening comprehension skills through activities that introduce French vocabulary related to climate and climate change. These activities will also help students to learn about impacts of climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in French language.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Practice and enhance reading and listening skills in French
  2. Learn and use French vocabulary related to climate and climate change through reading and listening comprehension exercises

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Language: French, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension

Climate Vocabulary, Climate Change Vocabulary

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Nova Scotia (Canada), Pacific Islands
Language(s) French, English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40 min

Contents

Reading

(~20 min)

 

An introductory reading (in French) that provides an overview of climate change, including its causes and consequences. It also briefly describes the projected impacts of climate change in Nova Scotia, Canada. Further, this reading lists commonly used climate- and climate change-related terms and their associated meanings. The document is also available in English.

French version of the Reading

English version of the Reading

Classroom activity: Listening Comprehension (20 min

 

An activity module based on a short interview (video format) in French that includes a discussion on the effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands. A set of exercises related to the interview is available for listening comprehension assessment.

Activity module for intermediate or advanced learners of French

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this reading, ‘Introduction aux changements climatiques’ by Clean Foundation, Canada, to provide an introduction to climate change to your students.
  2. Introduce new vocabulary related to climate and climate change through this text.
  3. If required, use the English version of the document, ‘Climate Change background info’ to explain the meaning of new terms and vocabulary.
  4. Discuss the projected impacts of climate change in Nova Scotia, Canada.
  5. Facilitate an open or group discussion on natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change to help students use the new terms and expressions.

French version of the Reading

English version of the Reading

 

Step 2: Listening Comprehension

  1. Use the activity module ‘La Communauté du Pacifique mobilisée contre le changement climatique’ from Apprendre le franҫais avec TV5MONDE to help your students to further enhance their vocabulary and to learn about the effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands.
  2. Play the embedded video (an interview in French) and use the given set of interactive exercises to assess listening comprehension and vocabulary.
  3. (If required, use the available transcript to facilitate better understanding of the content).

Activity module for intermediate or advanced learners of French

As a High School English Language teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the literary device of allegory and examine an allegory in climate literature.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach about the usage of allegory as a literary device, its multiple interpretations and its examples in literature. Climate change being an important issue of our times, has spawned climate literature in verse and prose. As part of this lesson plan, your students will analyze a contemporary fairy tale about climate change for its allegorical components.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is an allegory? Describe its role in myths and fables.
  2. What are the different types of allegories used in English literature?
  3. Comment on the use of allegory as a device to communicate about climate change.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline English Language, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Literary Devices, Allegory, Metaphors

Fables, Parables, Types of Allegory

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
40 min

Contents

Reading

(~15 min)

 

An introduction to allegory as a literary device through the ages and brief descriptions of its types and examples in literature.

Go to the Reading

Audio file and Visualization

(5 min)

 

An audio file that introduces an allegory about climate change by the author, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA. This allegory will be examined in the ensuing classroom activity. Also, a visualization that depicts the climate fact on which the allegory is based.

Go to the Audio and Transcript

Go to the Visualization

Classroom Activity

(20 min)

 

The reading of the above-mentioned allegory about climate change and a list of questions for the examination of this text for its allegorical components and interpretations.

Go to the Resource

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘Allegory’ by Encyclopedia Britannica to introduce the topic of allegory in English Literature.
  2. Use the text to define allegory and describe how it has been used in literary texts.
  3. Discuss how allegories are an integral part of fables, parables and myths.
  4. Use the reading to discuss about the works of writers who have used this literary device in the past.
  5. Describe the different types of allegories such as personification and symbolism.
  6. Finally, emphasize on the central idea or background information on which the allegories are based.

This can be accessed  here.

 

Step 2: Background information for the allegory to be studied in class

  1. Use the audio file from the report, ‘A Climate Scientist On ‘Slaying The Climate Dragon’’ by National Public Radio, Inc (US), to introduce the author of a climate change allegory (that will be examined in the ensuing classroom activity).
  2. In the report, the author Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA, reads a part of the story and explains the allegorical components of it.
  3. Use the report to provide your students with the vital background information about human induced global warming.
  4. Use the visualization, ‘Warming relative to 1850-1900’ by World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), to show that global temperatures are rising above the pre-industrial age levels and will continue to rise unless preemptive actions are taken to curb the anthropogenic causes of global warming such as greenhouse gas emissions.

Go to the Audio and Transcript

Go to the Visualization

 

Step 3: Classroom Activity: Examine an allegory on Climate Change (Go to the Resource)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Slaying the Climate Dragon’ by Kate Marvel in the Scientific American, to analyze an allegory on climate change.
  2. Direct your students to read the fairy tale closely and allow enough time for them to make notes about its allegorical elements.
  3. Use the notes to initiate a classroom discussion on different aspects of the story.
  4. Ask your students to draw parallels between the fairy tale narrative and the real-world scenario by listing all the perceived elements of climate change in the text eg. rising sea-levels, biodiversity loss, and extreme weather events.
  5. Finally, facilitate a classroom discussion using the following list of questions to assess student understanding of allegory as a literary device for communicating climate change.

List of discussion points: (adapted from Change Reflection Questions by ReadWriteThink.org)

  • Who in the text is facing change?
  • How does this character respond to change?
  • Do other characters provide help or advice for the character that is facing change? What advice do they give?
  • What does the character learn about this change?
  • In what way is this text a literary allegory?

As a High School English Language teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students how to read and analyze poetry and to use these techniques to examine climate related poems.

In this lesson plan, students will be taught how to read poetry and identify elements such as theme, structure, and tone. Through this lesson plan your students will also be introduced to one of the most significant issues of our times- Climate Change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How is poetry read?
  2. What are the essential components of poetry?
  3. How is a poetry analysis done?
  4. How is climate change portrayed in modern poetry?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline English, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Reading Poetry

Poetry Elements- Structure, Tone, Theme

Poetry Analysis

Climate related Poetry

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location India
Language(s) English
Access Online. offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 80 min

Contents

A Teaching Module

(~30-40 min)

A teaching module that provides a step-by-step guide to reading poetry and analyzing its various components such as tone, structure, and theme. It includes several links to teaching resources and a worksheet for poetry analysis.

 

Go to the Resource

Classroom Activity

(~30-40min)

 

A curated list of climate change related poetry for analysis using techniques learnt from the previous resource. This list of poems is also available as audio recordings in the voices of celebrities.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the module, ‘Preparing for Poetry: A Reader’s First Steps’ by Jason Rhody, published by EDSITEment, National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), to take your students through a step-by-step guide to reading poetry.
  2. Follow the instructions to facilitate the students’ understanding of the techniques involved in reading and analyzing poetry.
  3. Use this teaching resource to also enable your students to learn how to prepare an essay about a poem.

Go to the Resource

Step 2: Apply the understanding in written and spoken discussions

  1. Choose one or more poems from the list of 21 poems, ‘’Our melting, shifting, liquid world’: celebrities read poems on climate change’ curated by UK poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy and published by the Guardian, to read in class.
  2. The poems can be downloaded, and copies prepared beforehand for classroom reading.
  3. You can also choose to engage your students further by playing audio files (mp3 format) of the chosen poems read out by celebrities- James Franco, Jeremy Irons, Ruth Wilson, Gabriel Byrne, Michael Sheen, Kelly Macdonald, Maxine Peake, Tamsin Greig, Ian Glen, and Iwan Rheon.
  4. Use the worksheet (from the first resource), ‘Preparing for Poetry’ by NEH to ask your students to analyze the chosen poems.
  5. Use the completed worksheets to facilitate a classroom discussion on the theme of climate change poetry.
  6. Further, encourage your students to employ the techniques learnt to prepare an essay on the chosen poem/s.

Note: In order to improve your students’ understanding of the climate change theme beforehand, you can give a brief overview using this educators’ resource by CLEAN Foundation, Canada.

The curated list of climate change poems can be accessed here.

Data Visualization of GHG Emissions

As a Primary and Middle School Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach your students the basics of data handling using climate data.

This lesson plan can be used to introduce your students to data handling, data representation and interpretation using weather and climate data of India. Climate change is believed to cause more frequent extreme weather events such as higher than average temperatures and increased rainfall/precipitation. This lesson plan will enable students to assess such climate variability by analyzing local climate data.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Seema Mittal, Pallavi Surana, Medha Vaidya, Anupama Anikhindi and Varsha Walke, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is data and how can it be represented?
  2. What is the data range of a given dataset?
  3. What is the temperature and precipitation range of a city for a selected month over a 10-year period?
  4. Does the climate data from your hometown show extreme weather events that may be linked to climate change?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Primary and Middle school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Data Handling, Data Representation and Interpretation, Data Range, Bar Graphs
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location India
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(~8-12 min)

A video micro-lecture that introduces the basics of data representation followed by a practice set.

Go to the Resource

Teaching Module

(10 – 15 min)

Video tutorials followed by practice sets on how to create and read bar-graphs.

Go to the Resource

Classroom Activity

(~10-20 min)

A classroom activity for simple data analysis using climate data of cities in India from the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD).

 

The IMD webpage for selecting climate datasets for various Indian cities can be accessed here

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the tool, ‘Representing Data’ by Khan Academy to introduce the concept of a data set to your students.
  2. Further, explain how this data can be sorted and represented in tabular form, bar-graphs, line graphs and so on.
  3. Explain how the represented data can then be interpreted by asking relevant questions.
  4. Use the given practice set of questions to reinforce these concepts.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 2 : Further their understanding of data representation using bar graphs

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Creating a bar graph’ by Khan Academy to describe how bar graphs are constructed to represent data.
  2. Navigate to the following tabs- ‘Reading Bar graphs’ and ‘Interpreting Bar graphs’ to enable your students to understand how bar graphs are used.
  3. Use the practice set of questions within the teaching module to allow students to apply their understanding of these concepts.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Classroom Activity: Constructing bar graphs using climate data

A) Use the website of the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) to obtain climate datasets for selected cities.

B) Instructions to obtain climate data for Indian cities:

  1. Enter the name of the chosen city in the filter for ‘City Weather’ to obtain the current weather report.
  2. Click the tab, ‘Extreme and Climatological Information’ at the bottom of this webpage to obtain datasets for ‘Extreme Weather Events in the Current Month’ in the past 10 years, and a climate dataset for a 30-year period.

C) Conduct the activity with the data obtained as follows:

  1. Use the ‘Climatological Table’ on the webpage to make bar graphs of:
  2. Daily Maximum temperature (y-axis) versus months of the year (x-axis) and
  3. Mean Total Rainfall in mm (y-axis) versus months of the year (x-axis)
  4. A simple how-to video guide on making bar graphs using climate data can be accessed here.
  5. These graphs will allow your students to understand the annual weather patterns in different Indian cities.
  6. Explain what the data ranges are for both weather parameters. You can use these representations to describe the climate of a city.
  7. Now, use the data for a particular month eg. September, as a baseline and plot the corresponding data points (Maximum temperature and 24 Hours Highest Rainfall from ‘Extreme weather events’ table) for the past 10 years.
  8. Describe the data range, which is the variation of these weather parameters from the climatological baseline conditions.
  9. Facilitate a classroom discussion on any weather extreme events and the possibility of it being linked to climate change.

The climate data of Indian cities can be accessed here

Note: Teachers of other countries may conduct a similar activity using their local climate and weather data.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a Middle or High School English teacher or a teacher of English as a second language, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach tenses using climate literature.

Global warming is causing glaciers to melt thus causing a water crisis. Satellite imagery is used to record and measure these climate induced changes on the Earth’s surface over time. This lesson plan includes a reading resource that reports on the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers over the past 40 years due to global warming. In the context of this lesson plan, this text can be used to identify different types of verb tenses and discuss their usage in English language.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by  Swaroop Gokhale and Sriparna Paulchoudhury, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are the verb tenses in the English Language?
  2. How are the different types of tenses used in the English language?
  3. Identify the different types of tenses in a sample text about climate change.

Image: Changri Nup Glacier in Nepal. Much of it is covered by rocky debris. The peak of Mt. Everest is in the background at left.

Credit: JOSH MAURER/LDEO , National Geographic

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle or High school
Discipline Language- English
Topic(s) in Discipline Verb Tenses- Past, Present and Future

Subtypes of tenses- Simple

Continuous (progressive), Perfect

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Himalayas
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Video lecture

(~42 min)

A video lecture that introduces each of the verb tenses through simple timelines and demonstrates their usage.

Go to the Video

Reading and Classroom activity

 

(10 – 20 min)

An article on global warming induced melting of Himalayan glaciers that can be used as a sample text to peruse for identification of the different verb forms.

Go to the Reading

Note: An answer key for this text can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the video lecture, ‘Using Timelines to Teach Verb Tenses’ by Dr. Dianne Tyers, Advance Consulting for Education (ACE), to introduce your students to verb tenses in English language.
  2. Use the simple timelines described in the video lecture to explain how each of the tenses-past, present and future- can be used.
  3. Use the lecture to also elaborate on the different sub-types of tenses-simple, continuous (progressive), and perfect- and their usage in English language.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Apply the learning by perusing a sample text on climate change

  1. Use the reading, ‘Himalayan glaciers melting at alarming rate, spy satellites show’, by Stephen Leahy, National Geographic, to enable your students to apply their learning of tenses and their sub-types by examining this sample text and identifying them, as a classroom activity.
  2. Give your students handouts of the article and ask them to read it in pairs. Instruct them to highlight the verbs in the text and identify their tenses.
  3. As supporting material, an answer key is provided here for this sample text.

Go to the Reading

Note: An answer key for this text can be accessed here.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a Middle or High School French teacher or a teacher of French as a second language (basic or elementary level), you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach climate related French vocabulary and its usage in creative writing and spoken discussion.

Climate change is one of the most significant issue of our times. This lesson plan will allow students to learn basic French vocabulary related to the environment and climate change through reading activities. Further, it will enable them to apply this understanding in creative writing exercises.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in French.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by Deepali Godbole and Sarita Rokade, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Learning Goals

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Learn French Vocabulary related to the environment and climate change
  2. Apply the use of climate related French Vocabulary in writing and in spoken discussion
  3. Understand how climate change is one of the most significant issue of our times

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle or High school
Discipline Language- French
Topic(s) in Discipline French Vocabulary, Creative Writing in French

Climate and Environment related French Vocabulary

French Reading Comprehension, Email Writing Exercise in French

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global
Language(s) French, English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(20 min)

An introductory reading in French for teachers that gives an overview of climate change, its causes and impacts. This includes a list of commonly used terms in climate related text and their associated meanings. This document is also available in English.

Go to the Reading (French version)

Go to the Reading (English version)

Classroom activity:

Reading Comprehension and Creative Writing

(30 min)

An activity module that includes the reading of an informal email in French that talks about the immediate environmental issues in the city of Nîmes in France and about global warming with an accompanying English translation of the same. Also included are follow-up webpages to revise the vocabulary used in the email, instructions for an email writing exercise and a grammar test to assess the learning.

(Optional: This resource also includes a video that talks about preserving the environment.)

Note: This video may not be accessible in all global locations however its transcript is freely available to download here.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this reading, ‘Introduction aux changements climatiques’ by Clean Foundation, Canada, to explain the main points about climate change to your students.
  2. Use portions of the text, especially the list of climate related terms, to acquaint your students with climate terminology and their corresponding words and meanings.
  3. If required, use the English version of the document, ‘Climate Change background info’ to explain the meanings of the climate related terms.
  4. Ask your students to note the newly introduced French vocabulary for the subsequent writing activity.

Go to the Reading (French version)

Go to the Reading (English version)

 

Step 2 : Apply the new vocabulary in an exercise of writing and classroom discussion

  1. Use the activity module, ‘The environment- Writing’ by Bitesize, BBC, to conduct a series of classroom activities in French.
  2. Use the given email sample, ‘Environmental issues’ in French as a reading exercise for your students and use the corresponding English translation to explain the French text to them.
  3. Navigate to the next webpage, ’Writing about the environment’ to direct your students to do a writing exercise in French- a response email to the previously perused one.
  4. Besides asking them to use the ‘ideas’ given in the webpage to compose the email response, remind them of the climate related vocabulary acquired from the previous resource.
  5. Direct your students to use it in their email writing exercise by including points about climate change and how it affects them locally/regionally.
  6. Finally, use the tab for ‘Test’ to access an online test in grammar related to the topic of environment.
  7. (Optional: Use the tab ‘Video’ to play a video that talks about preserving the environment. Note: This video may not be accessible in all global locations however its transcript in French with its translation in English, is available to download here. This may be used for a role play exercise in French).

Go to the Activity

Video Transcript

As a High School or Undergraduate Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about mountains that comprise one of Earth’s major landforms and the factors that affect their climate. This lesson plan will teach your students about geomorphic characteristics of mountains, orogeny- formation of mountains through tectonic processes in the Earth’s crust and enable them to describe different types of mountains (such as fold and fault-block mountains) and major mountain systems of the world.

This lesson plan also includes a resource to explain how global climatic factors affect mountains and how mountains in turn, affect regional climate.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography or Earth Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by Smita Kalvey, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

 

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is orogeny? Where are most orogenic belts located?
  2. Compare and contrast between fold and fault-block mountains.
  3. How do global climatic factors affect mountain climate and how do mountains in turn, affect regional climate?
Jura Mountains, Neuchâtel canton, Switzerland

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Orogeny, Tectonic Processes, Fold Mountains

Fault-Block Mountains, Volcanism, Crustal Shortening

Heating and Thermal Expansion, Alpine-Type Mountain Belts

Andean-Type Mountain Belts, Intracontinental Mountain Belts

Climate Factors- Latitude, Elevation and Continentality

Climate Topic Climate and the Lithosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(~25 min)

A reading that introduces mountains and explains how they are formed or destroyed. It also describes different mountain types and various mountain systems of the world.

Go to the Reading

Video Lectures

(24 min)

A video lecture that explains how global climatic factors affect mountain climate and how mountains in turn, influence the local climate.

Go to the Video

Reading (10 min) A reading to describe the effect of climate change on mountains.

Go to the Reading

(pages 68-70)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Mountain- Landform’ by Peter H. Molnar, Encyclopedia Britannica, to introduce the topic of mountains and their geomorphic characteristics.
  2. Use the text to explain the tectonic processes that are involved in the formation and degradation of mountain belts.
  3. Describe different types of mountains such as fold and fault-block mountains giving suitable examples and explain the processes involved in their formation.

Step 2: Develop the topic of mountains further by describing their role in climate (Go to the Video)

  1. Play the video lecture, ‘Global Climate Drivers’ by Coursera to introduce your students to the role of mountains in global climatic conditions.
  1. Use the video lecture to first describe various global climate drivers such as the Hadley Cells and the Coriolis Force that can cause imbalances in temperature, wind and precipitation on the Earth’s surface.
  2. Extend this understanding by using the lecture and the quoted examples to explain how factors such as latitude, elevation and continentality of mountains influence the climate of different regions across the globe.
  3. Discuss how these factors affect mountain climate and in turn, how regional or local climates are affected by mountain belts.

Step 3: Dicuss further with a reading (Go to the Reading)

Use the reading, ‘Mountains and Climate Change- From Understanding to Action’, pages 68-70, by Thomas Kohler and Daniel Maselli, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), Bern, to briefly discuss the global geo-physical, biological and socio- economic effects of climate change on mountains.

 

As a High School Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach basic trigonometry.

Global warming is causing glaciers and ice sheets to melt thus causing sea levels to rise. The rate of sea level rise is a few millimeters per year. While this may seem inconsequential at first glance, it can produce significantly greater inland sea water intrusion over time especially in low lying coastal areas. This lesson plan will enable students to apply simple trigonometric functions to understand this phenomenon. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Chirag Dhara, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune.

(Image: Sea level rise and additional inland intrusion :Concept by Chirag Dhara, Graphic by Firstpost)

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How are trigonometric functions used to study triangles?
  2. How can trigonometric functions be used to study coastline retreat because of sea level rise?
  3. How much land would be inundated due to sea level rise in the next 10 years? And by 2100?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Trigonometry, Sine Function, Cosine Function, Tangent
Climate Topic Climate and the Hydrosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(25 -30min)

A reading that introduces basic trigonometry concepts and trigonometric ratios in right triangles.

Go to the Reading

Visualization

(10 min)

An interactive visualization of the variation in sea level height from 1993 to present day, as recorded by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre.

Go to the Visualization

Classroom /Laboratory Activity

(15-20 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to use trigonometry to calculate how much the coastline has receded (and will recede in the future) because of sea level rise.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the resource, ‘Trigonometric ratios in right triangles’ by Khan Academy, to introduce the simple trigonometric ratios and their relation to right angled triangles.
  2. First introduce the basic trigonometric functions like sine, cosine and tangent, and how they relate to the study of triangles and circles.
  3. Then, discuss the trigonometric ratios in right triangles and how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles. Use the embedded video to discuss several examples to enable your students to understand these concepts better.

Go to the Resource

Step 2: Discuss further

  1. Use the interactive tool, ‘Sea Level’ by NASA, to visualize the satellite observations of global sea level rise over time.
  2. Explain that global warming is causing the rise in sea levels due to the melting of ice-sheets.
  3. Emphasize that the sea levels are rising globally by an average of about 3mm/year.

Go to the Interactive Resource

Step 3: Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

Use the figure provided above in this lesson plan, ‘Sea level rise and additional inland intrusion’ by Chirag Dhara in Firstpost, to explain how sea level rise results in large-scale inundation of the coastline.

Use this depiction to explain to your students how trigonometric functions can be used to calculate the extent of land intrusion by the rising sea levels.

The gently sloping area adjoining the coast is called the Continental Shelf, where the average downward slope is only about 0.1o as shown in the graphic above. Recall the NASA estimate of sea level rise to be about 3cm in 10 years as noted from the previous tool. Now ask your students to calculate the coastline retreat because of sea level rise. Use the tangent trigonometric function to calculate coastline retreat.

  1. Discuss how the coastline retreat is disproportionately large for what would seem like a very small vertical rise in sea level.
  2. What could be the implications of rising sea levels on the coastal regions globally?
  3. How much has the coastline approximately receded since the 1850s to the present times?
  4. How much do we expect it to recede by 2100?
  5. Answer key: Sea levels have risen over 20 cm since 1850. Sea level is expected to rise further by 30 – 120cm by 2100 (Video; NASA’s Earth Minute: Sea Level Rise).

As a high school or undergraduate English teacher, you can use a climate change related spoken text to help you in teaching note making and summary writing, as part of English for Academic Purposes (EAP).

The lesson involves training students to listen to an academic talk carefully, make notes, and then turn the notes into a summary. This talk titled ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ by Per Espen Stoknes is about climate change communication.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) or Functional English.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, IISER Pune, India

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How do you make notes from a spoken text?
  2. How do you write a summary from notes from an academic talk?
  3. What, according to the speaker, are the primary obstacles to communicating about and engaging with climate change?
  4. What strategies can we use to communicate climate change more effectively and get people more involved?

How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming

Per Espen Stoknes |TED Global NYC

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergradute
Discipline English Language, Functional English

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Topic(s) in Discipline Note Making Skills, Summary Writing

Climate Change Communication

Rhetorical or Persuasive Strategies in Communication

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, England
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
75-90 min

Contents

Reading

(20 min)

  1. A brief introduction of Per Espen Stoknes, the speaker of the TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’, which is the primary spoken text used as teaching material for note making and summary writing in this lesson plan.  (Go to the Reading)
  1. A reading to introduce note making, and how it can be done for a spoken text. (Go to the Reading)
  1. A reading to explain how a summary can be written from notes. (Go to the Reading)
A TED talk video

(25 min)

A TED talk by Per Espen Stoknes, to analyze using note making skills first, followed by summary writing skills.

Go to the TED talk

Classroom Activity

(30-45 min)

A classroom activity of summary writing using the notes prepared from listening carefully to the Per Espen Stoknes’ talk mentioned above. This will be followed by a classroom discussion using a set of questions.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Begin with an open discussion in your class to make it easier for them to understand the context and content of the talk to be examined. Use the following questions for your discussion:
    1. What do you understand by climate change?
    2. What kind of news or stories do you encounter regarding climate change?
    3. As an individual, if you wish to convince someone of your point of view, what strategies do you employ?
  1. Use this discussion to help your students understand that the talk pertains to climate change communication, and that rhetorical or persuasive strategies in communication will also be discussed.
  1. Next, use the brief account, ‘Per Espen Stoknes’ by TED.com to introduce the speaker whose TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’, will be studied for note making and summary writing. Stoknes is a psychologist and an economist, and a member of the Green Party in Norway. He is the author of the book, ‘What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming’ (2015).

Visit the Resource

  1. Now, use the resource, ‘Note making’ by University of Leeds, to introduce your students to the concept of note making. Begin with an explanation of what note making is, and how to do it for a spoken text. Explain that notes are not complete sentences, but key words linked together so that the outline can retrospectively give the note maker a good sense of the entire talk. Further, explain that to prepare notes from a talk, they will have to listen carefully to the talk being examined; identify key terms, and the order of ideas; and note them in an abbreviated manner.

Visit the Resource

  1. Finally, use the tool, ‘How to Write a Summary’ by Lumen Learning, to introduce the topic of summary writing. Explain to your students what a summary is- it is a paragraphed text that recapitulates, in one’s own words, the main points and illustrative examples of the original text. Explain to your students that they are supposed to capture what the original text says in the summarizer’s own words but without commentary or opinion. The summary should include the title of the talk, the speaker’s name, and the topic, along with the key points, critical arguments, and illustrative examples. It should answer questions such as the what, why, and how of the text. Use the enumerated points in the text to further explain the salient features of a summary and discuss the format in which a summary is written.

Go to the Reading

Step 2: Watch the TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ and make notes (Go to the TED talk)

  1. Play the video, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ by Per Espen Stoknes, in 4 parts. The reason for breaking this into parts is that each part forms one subsection of the talk, and the talk itself is about 15 minutes long, so for them to take notes for the entire talk at one go may be overwhelming.
  2. If your students are not very comfortable with the accent of the speaker or with the English language itself, you can slow the speed of the talk using the speed button on the link.
    1. Part 1: 00:00 – 02:00 minutes
    2. Part 2: 02:01 – 07:19 minutes
    3. Part 3: 07:20 – 11:25 minutes
    4. Part 4: 11:26 – 15:00 minutes
  1. Between each sub-section, take 3-5 minutes to check with the students if they can understand the talk and discuss what they are taking down in the form of notes. It is important to remind them to write down key words as they appear on screen, a few words to help them remember an example, and the primary argument being made in that subsection. If they have not understood a term, you may need to explain it.
  2. You may also put down these key points on the board in note form. This subsection-wise discussion should help them to fill in the gaps that they might have had from their own listening.

Step 3: Summary Writing and Classroom Discussion

  1. Play the video once more, but this time without any breaks. This will help them fill any gaps that they might have when they watched the video the first time or questions that did not get answered during the discussions. Once done, ask them to go over their notes.
  2. Then revise with them what a summary is. Now, ask them to refer to their notes and write a summary of the talk. For this video’s length, the summary will be about 600-700 words. It will be split into four parts (parallel to the breaks above), and therefore, will have a minimum of four paragraphs.
  3. Initiate a classroom discussion, using the following set of questions. During the discussion, encourage your students to make notes again.
    1. Why do we need more effective communication skills when it comes to climate change?
    2. What useful strategies does the speaker suggest for effectively communicating about, and engaging with, climate change?
    3. What is the significance of stories, according to the speaker?
    4. Do you agree with the strategies that Per Espen Stoknes suggests? Do you think these would be successful in other communication contexts?
    5. What does this talk tell us about human beings and their minds?

 

Homework assignment: Ask your students to write short summaries that cover the above points, using their prepared notes.