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As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about evolutionary adaptations in animals due to climate change.

Evolutionary Adaptation is the morphological or physiological adjustment of organisms to their environment to improve their chances of survival. With climate change associated altered precipitation patterns, rising sea-levels, and extreme weather events, ecosystems across the globe are being disrupted. This lesson plan includes resources that explain how climate change is affecting many animals species and how they are adapting to their changed environments.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Rajendra Phartyal and Dr Mansi Verma, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

The brown butterfly from Africa

American Pika

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is evolutionary adaptation? Give suitable examples.
  1. How is adaptation different from phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental changes?
  1. How is climate change influencing evolutionary adaptations in living organisms?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Evolutionary Adaptations, Natural Selection

Phenotypic Variations, Genetic Variations

Gene Frequency, Phenotypic Plasticity

Morphological or Physiological Traits, Epigenetic Factors

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, some resources are available offline
Approximate
Time Required
40-70 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading to introduce the topic of adaptation in living organisms.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~5 min)

A video that briefly explains how and why animals are adapting in response to climate change.

Go to the Video

Reading

(15 min)

A reading to explain how climate change induced evolutionary adaptations occur in several animal species.

Go to the Reading

Optional: Teaching Module

(2 sessions of 35 min each)

A detailed case study of the willow leaf beetle’s adaptation in North America to a warming climate.

Go to the Teaching Module

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the text, ‘Adaptation’ by Encyclopedia Britannica, to introduce the topic of adaptation in living organisms.
  2. Explain the need of several species to adapt to changing environments in order to improve their chances of survival.
  3. Describe the main characteristics of evolutionary adaptations.
  4. Discuss how natural selection works on variations in the species’ populations leading to- inherited morphological or physiological changes- adaptations.
  5. Emphasize on how it differs from other favorable circumstances like useful traits and phenotypic plasticity in organisms, in order to adjust to environmental aberrations.
  6. Finally, discuss the different examples given in text like the adaptation of the peppered moth in wing coloration from the beginning of the industrial revolution, to drive in the point of evolutionary adaptations.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 2: Introduce climate change as a driver of evolutionary adaptation in the wild

  1. Use the video, ‘Can wildlife adapt to climate change?’ by Erin Eastwood for TED-Ed, to briefly introduce your students to climate change as a driver of evolutionary adaptation in several animal species in the wild.
  2. Use the examples in the video to point out how climate change has led to disrupted ecosystems and changed environments for many animal species.
  3. Finally, emphasize on their need to adapt in order to improve their rates of survival.

This can be accessed at:

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Improve understanding of climate change induced evolutionary adaptations

  1. Use the blog, ‘What Helps Animals Adapt (or Not) to Climate Change?’ by Renee Cho, Earth Institute, Columbia University to discuss the different aspects of evolutionary adaptations to climate change in animals.
  2. Explain how a warming climate forces animals to ‘move, adapt or die’.
  3. Use the text to discuss examples of organisms such as corals that show evidence of climate related adaptations.
  4. Describe the role of epigenetics in the phenotypic plasticity of several species that permits them to survive better in unfavorable conditions.
  5. Use the examples in the text to explain how this gives ‘time’ (to evolve) for several species to develop adaptations to changing environmental conditions.
  6. Also, discuss some examples where phenotypic plasticity is not an advantage.
  7. Finally, use the text to discuss how important it is to maintain large species populations and the biodiversity of Earth to allow for short time-scale evolutionary changes to adapt to a changing climate.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 4: (Optional) Use a case study of the willow leaf beetle to extend understanding of evolutionary adaptations to a warming climate

Use this teaching module, ‘Natural selection from the gene up: The work of Elizabeth Dahlhoff and Nathan Rank’ by the Understanding Evolution team, University of California Museum of Paleontology, to examine the research of these scientists to better understand how natural selection shapes the evolutionary process leading to adaptations in the willow leaf beetle, the subject of warming climatic conditions.

Note that this teaching module addresses 3 key questions (as given in the module):

  1. How do biologists study natural selection in the wild?
  2. How do differences at the genetic level translate into changes in populations and ecology?
  3. What are evolutionary trade-offs?

This module is designed such that one or more components may be used for your teaching.

  1. Navigate through the 12 pages of this module by using the tab in the upper right-hand corner of the webpage.
  2. Each page can be printed separately or viewed in print format.
  3. Download the student reading guide (link given at bottom of the webpage) and distribute copies to your students. Use this guide to channel your students through the different aspects of this study using an enquiry-based method (questions given in guide).
  4. Go to page 11 of the module for a list of discussion and extension questions. Use the list to encourage your students to elaborate on their understanding of evolutionary adaptations in a warming climate.

This can be accessed here

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about CRISPR: Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, a new gene editing technology that could enable certain species to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

This lesson plan includes resources that teach about gene editing using the CRISPR-Cas 9 pathway in bacteria. This pathway is a part of the adaptive immunity against phage infection in bacteria. It can be engineered to be used as a gene editing tool in living organisms. This lesson plan includes case studies that show how CRISPR gene editing technology can be used as a climate adaptation strategy.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Sneha Bhogale, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the function of CRISPR in bacteria? Describe the main components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system.
  2. Describe the two main DNA repair mechanisms in a cell.
  3. Explain how the CRISPR gene editing technique exploits the cell’s DNA repair system to introduce targeted mutations.
  4. How can CRISPR gene editing help plant breeding programs to adapt to the effects of climate change? Elaborate using a suitable example.
  5. Discuss the use of CRISPR technology as a climate adaptation strategy to conserve coral reefs.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gene Editing, CRISPR, CRISPR-Cas9 Pathway

DNA Repair Mechanisms, Double Stranded Breaks (DSBs)

Non- Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

Homologous Recombination (HR)

Targeted Mutations, Nucleases

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Video

(~4 min)

A video to introduce the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway in bacteria and the CRISPR gene editing technique.

Go to the Video

Visualization (35 – 40 min) An interactive visualization to teach about the DNA repair mechanisms in cells and how the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique can be used to exploit these repair systems to achieve targeted mutations in living cells. A section in the tool also discusses some applications of this gene editing technology.

Go to the Visualization

Video and Reading

(~3 min + 5 min)

Case studies to demonstrate the use of CRISPR gene editing technology as a climate adaptation strategy in living organisms.

Video is here

Reading is here

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Begin with introducing what gene editing is and explain how it is different from genetic engineering- Gene editing, is a process in which DNAis inserted, deleted, modified or replaced at a specific site in the genome of a living organism. Genetic engineering, on the other hand randomly inserts or deletes genetic material to introduce mutations.
  2. In gene editing, nucleases/ molecular scissors are used which introduce a double stranded break (DSB) in the DNA at specific locations after which DNA repair mechanisms of the cell take over resulting in targeted mutations (edits).
  3. Then, briefly discuss the commonly used nucleases- meganucleases, Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector-based nucleases (TALENS) and CRISPR- that are used for gene editing.
  4. Emphasize that this lesson plan will focus on the CRISPR-Cas9 system of gene editing, as it is reported in recent times to be more efficient and effective than the others.
  5. Use this animated video, ‘Genome Editing with CRISPR-Cas9’, narrated by Feng Zhang, McGovern Institute of Brain Research, MIT, to introduce the topic of gene editing using CRISPR-Cas9 system and to briefly describe the structural components of the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Extend understanding of the CRISPR-Cas9 pathway and CRISPR gene editing using an interactive visualization

  1. Use the interactive visualization, ‘CRISPR-Cas9 Mechanism & Application’ by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) BioInteractive, to enable your students to visualize how the CRISPR-Cas9 technology works at the molecular level and to explore its different components.
  2. Start by launching the ‘interactive’ component of the visualization tool.
  3. Navigate through the visualization to sequentially describe the gene-editing events of targeting and binding of the CRISPR-Cas9 complex to the target DNA, cleaving or breaking of the DNA at the target location and repairing of the DNA to introduce the desired mutation.
  4. Use the ‘explore’ button at every step to describe the different molecular components involved in the pathway.
  5. Use the tab, ‘How it’s used’ to view 20 short videos that explain how CRISPR gene editing technology can be used to achieve different results in its applications in science and industry.

Go to the visualization

 

Step 3: Discuss two case studies where CRISPR gene editing has been used as a climate adaptation strategy

  1. Use the video, ‘Gene editing yields tomatoes that flower and ripen weeks earlier’ by Zachary Lippman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), to describe his use of CRISPR gene editing in two varieties of tomato plants to make them flower and ripen earlier than usual.
  2. Use the video to explain how this approach is useful to obtain faster and higher yields of the tomato crop.
  3. Discuss, using the video how this will also enable plants to be grown in higher latitudes, thereby offsetting crop loss, if any, due to global warming.
  4. To enable better understanding of Dr Lippman’s work, direct your students to listen to a CSHL Base Pairs podcast, link to which is available in the additional resources section of this lesson plan.
  5. Use the reading, ‘CRISPR used to genetically edit coral’ by Hanae Armitage, Office of Communication, Stanford Medicine, to explain the proof-of-principle study published in PNAS by Phillip Cleves et al. (2018).
  6. Use this brief communication to explain how this work could allow researchers to use the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool to identify and knock-out the coral genes responsible for coral bleaching due to ocean acidification.
  7. Discuss how this technique can thus be useful for coral conservation by building climate-resilient corals.

Go to the Video

Go to the Reading

As a High School or Undergraduate Physics or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about the characteristics, properties and types of waves and oscillations, and how atmospheric wave dynamics possibly influence extreme weather events.

A wave is a continuous oscillation of a field about its equilibrium value. The wave traverses through the medium but when some parts of the medium are fixed then the waves reflect at this fixed point, become stationary, and are called standing waves. Standing waves occur in the atmosphere very often, due to heating in the tropical regions, land surface features like mountains, and land-water temperature gradients. Recent research suggests that the interaction of standing and travelling atmospheric Rossby waves could result in extreme weather events, such as heat waves and floods.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics or Earth Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Simple Harmonic Motion

Rossby Waves

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Distinguish between simple harmonic motion and waves.
  1. What are standing waves? Describe their characteristics.
  1. What are Rossby waves and how do they influence Earth’s weather patterns?
  1. How could the interference of atmospheric Rossby waves cause extreme weather events?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Physics, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Waves, Oscillations, Simple Harmonic Motion

Stationary Waves, Standing Waves, Rossby Waves

Wave Interference, Wave Forcing, Teleconnections

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline, An interactive tool available in several languages
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Reading

(~35 min)

 

A reading that introduces the topic of waves and oscillations in detail and describes their properties using graphical representations and mathematical expressions.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~13.5 min)

A video that describes how standing waves are formed due to fixed points in a medium.

Go to the Video

Video micro-lecture

(4 min)

A video micro-lecture that describes what Rossby waves are and how their interference by standing waves in the atmosphere influence mid-latitudinal weather conditions and in some cases, extreme weather events.

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Simple harmonic motion (SHM) is the oscillation of a single particle about a point of equilibrium. Usually, particles don’t exist by themselves and are part of a medium such as gas, liquid or solid. If some particles are provided with the energy to perform SHM, they transfer this energy to their neighboring particles, which then perform simple harmonic motion SHM themselves. This transfer of energy continues until most of the particles in the medium are in SHM. If there is no continuous source of energy, the particles initially performing SHM come back to rest, but the energy gets transferred. This phenomenon of energy transfer from one particle to its neighbor is a wave. The particles themselves do not move very far, but the energy contained in them travels a very long distance.

Thus, a wave is a continuous oscillation of a field about its equilibrium value. This field could be a physical medium such as water, ground, air or it could be electric and magnetic fields. In the former case, the wave is called a mechanical wave and in the latter case, the wave is called an electromagnetic wave.

Use the textbook chapter, ‘8.1: Introduction to Waves’ by Dina Zhabinskaya et al., LibreTextsTM to teach your students the topic of waves and oscillations in detail.

  1. Navigate through the different sections of this chapter to teach your students different aspects of waves- their properties and characteristics.
  2. Use the in-text examples and exercises to explain the various concepts better.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Extend understanding of the characteristics of waves

The speed with which a wave traverses a medium is determined by the properties of the medium. If a wave passes through two different media, the direction of propagation changes as it passes from one medium to another. This change in direction is proportional to the angle at which the wave is incident at the interface between the two media. This turning of waves is called refraction.

It is also possible that the wave cannot pass through the interface between the media and instead is “turned back” into the medium from which it came. This “turning back” of waves is called reflection. If the medium through which a mechanical wave is passing is perfectly elastic, then the medium itself does not absorb any of the energy transmitted by the wave. Most real media are not perfectly elastic, and hence the energy transmitted by the wave reduces as the wave passes through the medium. This phenomenon is called absorption of the wave by the medium.

When some parts of the medium are fixed- for example, if you tie the ends of a rope using nails- then the waves reflect at this fixed point and become stationary. This is called a standing wave.

Use the video, ‘Standing waves on strings’ by Khan Academy, to explain what standing waves are, how they are formed and what their characteristics are.

  1. Explain how these standing waves interfere with the travelling waves and show altered net wavelengths and amplitudes.
  2. Use the video to emphasize on the different aspects of superimposition of these waves due to interference such as destructive and constructive interference.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Discuss an example of wave interference and its consequences in Earth’s atmosphere

  1. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘Rossby waves and extreme weather’ by Kai Kornhuber, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, to introduce your students to atmospheric Rossby waves.
  2. Describe, using the video, how the free-flowing Rossby waves influence weather between the Arctic and the mid-latitudinal regions.
  3. Discuss the interference of the free-flowing Rossby waves with naturally occurring standing waves formed due to mountain ranges and land-water temperature gradients.
  4. Finally, explain how this interaction of standing and travelling waves can also result in extreme weather events, such as heat waves and floods.
  5. Emphasize on the increased frequency of such events and discuss how the interference of the Rossby waves could be responsible for this aspect of climate change.

Go to the Video

 

As a Middle School and High School English Language teacher, you can use a talk about climate change and an associated comprehension quiz to help you teach listening comprehension.

. This lesson plan uses the TED talk, “The disarming case to act right now on climate change” by Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, for listening comprehension followed by answering inferential questions, detecting emotive undertones as well as answering narrow focus questions about the vocabulary used. This lesson plan also includes an exercise of writing a response to the speaker via an informal letter, thereby allowing the students to articulate their own thoughts and opinions on the matter of climate change activism and to combine those with the information they have gathered.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) or Functional English.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, IISER Pune, India

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Listen carefully and comprehend a spoken text (a talk) in English
  2. Answer narrow focus as well as broad stroke questions related to the spoken text
  3. Write a letter to the Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, in response to her speech

How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming

Greta Thunberg |TEDx Stockholm

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle School, High school
Discipline English Language, Functional English

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Topic(s) in Discipline Listening Comprehension, Inferential Questions, Emotive Undertones, Vocabulary, Creative Writing, Letter Writing
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change, Climate Activism
Location Global
Language(s) English, Transcript available in 34 languages
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A brief introduction to the Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, whose talk will be examined for listening comprehension in this lesson plan.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~11 min)

A video talk by Greta Thunberg to use for listening comprehension and follow-up exercises. The transcript for this talk is available in 34 languages.

Go to the Video

A questionnaire (~25 min) based on the talk for in-class discussion can be found here.

Optional Homework Assignment

(25 min)

A suggested homework assignment of writing an informal letter as a response to the talk by Greta Thunberg following the in-class discussion.

Go to the Assignment

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and preliminary discussion

  1. Begin with an open discussion in your class based on the following questions:
    1. What do you think of climate change?
    2. What do you think of your role as a child/young adult in reducing climate change?
    3. Do you find yourself having different views than your family or friends about climate change?
  2. Use a news report, ‘Greta Thunberg: 16-year-old climate activist inspired international youth movement’ by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), to introduce them to Greta Thunberg, the speaker of the recorded TED talk, which is the primary text. Thunberg is one of the most well-known faces in climate activism and is herself of school going age. Discuss her primary achievements, her personal struggles, and her arguments for activism among young adults.

Go to the News Report

 

Step 2: Listening comprehension and discussion

  1. Play the video of Greta Thunberg’s TEDxStockholm talk titled, ‘The disarming case to act right now on climate change’. Allow them to listen to it in its entirety.
  2. The recording is about 11 minutes long. Encourage them to listen carefully and try to gather their overall impressions of the speech and speaker, as well as to note down or retain important pieces of information.
  3. Then give them a questionnaire, which is based on the video, in print form, to answer on their own as per the instructions for each question.
  4. Play the video recording once again so that they can correct their answers. You may spend some time discussing their responses.
  5. Then give them a questionnaire, which is based on the video, in print form, to answer on their own as per the instructions for each question.
  6. Play the video recording once again so that they can correct their answers. You may spend some time discussing their responses.

Go to the TEDx Video

Go to the Questionnaire

Go to the Answer Key

 

Step 3: Optional Activity or Homework Assignment

  1. Use the link, ‘How to Write informal Letters in English (With Examples)’ by Owlcation.com, to introduce your students to the basic rules of letter writing (salutations, sign off, and structure).
  2. Instruct the students to use this format to write a letter (homework assignment) to Greta Thunberg as a response to her talk.
  3. To complete this assignment, ask the students to think about climate change and how individuals can change the situation. Direct your students to use their impressions of Thunberg’s speech, coupled with their own ideas about climate change activism and their view of themselves as activists to form the bulk of a letter that they will address to Greta Thunberg.
  4. Instruct the students to include the following points in their letters:
    1. their choice of what they found most important in the talk
    2. how they feel about the issue of climate change
    3. what they do (or wish to do) about climate change
  5. Thus, this letter writing exercise enables two crucial skills to be tested and reinforced: one, the ability to glean and summarize information from an external source, and two: the ability to articulate one’s thoughts and opinions on an important issue and connect that to the information obtained.

Guideline for writing an informal letter

 

ELIMU YA MABADILIKO YA TABIA NCHI KATIKA MTALAA WA ELIMU DUNIANI KOTE.

  1. Mabadiliko ya tabia nchi ni mojawapo wa masuala muhimu katika kipindi cha sasa.
  2. Mabadiliko haya yanaathiri maendeleo endelevu na ya kiusawa ya nchi nyingi pamoja na raia wake.
  3. Ili pawe na utatuzi wa mabadiliko ya tabia nchi, watu wanafaa wafahamishwe kuhusina na hali hii.
  4. Hatua za kupunguza madhara ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi zitahitaji utatuzi ulio na msingi wa kimaeneo lakini zinazokubalika na ulimwengu wa kisayansi.
  5. Kufungamanishwa kwa elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mfumo wa elimu rasmi kutasaidia vizazi vya sasa na vile vijavyo kutambua mbinu mwafaka za kutatua, kupunguza na kukabiliana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Mradi wa TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org) unalenga kuhakikisha kuwa masomo yanayohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi yanaingizwa katika mifumo ya elimu ya  shule za upili na vile vile vyuo vikuu. Hii itachangia utambuzi wa sababu zinazosababisah mabadiliko ya tabia nchi pamoja na madhara yake miongoni mwa wanafunzi. Mradi huu wa TROP ICSU ni kati ya maazimio ya kuhakikisha kuwa kila mwanadamu anaweza akatumia talanta, mbinu na malengo yake  katika njia inayolenga kutatua madhara ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Mradi huu unalenga kuhakikisha kuna njia za kuaminika za kufundishia masomo yanayohusu mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mfumo wa elimu rasmi. Hali hii itahakikisha kuwa kila mwanfunzi minghairi ya kozi anayosomea atakuwa na utambuzi wa visababishi vya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi na atakuwa na mbinu za uvumbuzi wa utatuzi wa hali hii ambayo ni ya kilimwengu.

Kutokana na hili, basi mradi wa TROP ICSU unaoana moja kwa moja na maazimio ya Umoja wa Mataifa ikiwemo azimio la nne ambalo ni elimu bora kwa wote pamoja na azimio la kumi na tatu ambalo ni mabadiliko ya tabia nchi.

Ili kuafikia malengo ya mradi huu, jopokazi la TROP ICSU lililopo katika Taasisi ya Elimu ya Sayansi na Utafiti IISER iliyopou mjini Pune imebuni na kubainisha  hazina ya vifaa kutoka sehemu mbalimbali za uliwengu. Vifaa hivi vitatumiwa na walimu kufundishia masomo maalum kwa kutumia mifano, uchunguzi, na shughuli zinazohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi. Mradi huu umedhihirisha namna ya kufungamanisha elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi katika mtalaa uliopo. Mradi huu pia umebainisha vifaa mbali mbali vya ufundishaji kama vile (Mpango wa kazi wenye hatua zilizoelezwa kwa undani). Uwepo wa vifaa hivi ni ishara tosha ya juhudi za mradi hu kuhakikisha kuwa masomo yanayohusiana na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi yanafungamanishwa na mtalaa rasmi wa elimu. Mradi huu pia umebainisha mbinu za ufundishaji ambazo zinaaminika kisayansi zitakazotumiwa kufundishia masomo yanayohusina na mabadiliko ya tabia nchi kwa kuyafungamanisha na masomo mengine katika mtalaa. Kwa hivyo, matumizi ya vifaa vya ufundishaji vya TROP ICSU yatawasaidia walimu kufundisha elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi huku wakizingatia masomo mengine ya mtalaa.

Katika awamu ya kwanza ya mradi wa TROP ICSU, jopokazi limetoa mafunzo kupitia kwa semina kwa walimu na waelimishaji katika mataifa ya India, Bhutan, Afrika Kusini, Uganda, Misri, Ufaransa, Austria, Uchina, Uingereza na Australia. Katika semina hizi, waelimishaji walihakiki utendakazi wa vifaa hivi vya kufundishia. Wataalam wa elimu ya mabadiliko ya tabia nchi pia walihudhuria katika semina zingine na kutoa maoni yao muhimu. Ushirikiano kati ya mashirika ya Umoja wa Mataifa kama UNCC: Learn, Shirika la Hali ya Hewa Duniani (W.M.O) na Shirika la Utafiti wa Tabia Nchi (WCRP) umeahakikisha kuwa, mradi wa TROP ICSU umeidhinishwa pamoja na vifaa vya kufundishia vilivyopendekezwa. Jopokazi hili pia lilipata nafsi ya kuwasilisha hatua za kielimu walizopiga katika 4th UN STI Forum 2019 tarehe 15/05/2019 katika makao makuu ya Umoja wa Mataifa yaliyoko New York na vile vile katika High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) katika makao makuu ya Umoja wa Mataifa tarehe 11/07/2019 chini ya mada “Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action”. Vile vile, jopokazi hili limeshiriki katika mafunzo ya tabia nchi mjini COP 24 huko Uholanzi na pia semina zinazoandaliwa na walemishaji wa tabia nchi pamoja na walimu.

Mradi wa TROP ICSU ni wa kisasa na unaangazia masuala ibuka miongoni mwa vijana pamoja na juhudi za nchi kama Italia kuhakikisha kuwa, elimu ya tabia nchi inafungamanishwa katika mtalaa wa elimu.

Awamu ya kwanza ya mradi wa TROP ICSU ilipata ufadhili wa miaka mitatu kutoka kwas International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

Translated from English to Kiswahili by:
Dr. Hamisi Babusa,
Lecturer of Kiswahili and Language Education and Head Teaching Programmes,
Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya

Education aux changements climatiques à travers des programmes scolaires dans le monde entier:

  1. Le changement climatique est un des enjeux les plus préoccupants aujourd’hui.
  2. Il nuit au développement durable et équitable de tous les pays et de leurs citoyens.
  3. La sensibilisation du grand public vis-à-vis des enjeux est essentielle pour trouver des solutions.
  4. Les mesures visant à atténuer les effets du changement climatique impliqueront des solutions ancrées localement, mais fondées sur la science mondiale.
  5. L'intégration de l'éducation au changement climatique dans le système éducatif formel peut doter les générations actuelles et futures de compétences clés pour identifier des solutions localement pertinentes pour l'adaptation, l’atténuation et la résilience au dérèglement climatique.

Le projet TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/https://tropicsu.org/) vise à intégrer des sujets liés aux changements climatiques dans les programmes de base des écoles et des étudiants de premier cycle universitaire afin de les sensibiliser davantage  aux causes et aux effets des changements climatiques. Ce projet fait partie de la vision de la démocratisation du savoir afin que toute l'humanité puisse investir ses talents, ses compétences et ses ambitions de manière ciblée pour faire face aux problèmes du changement climatique.

L'objectif principal du projet est de fournir une source fiable de ressources éducatives validées qui intègrent les thèmes du changement climatique dans le programme de base du système éducatif formel. Cette approche garantira que tous les étudiants, quels que soient leur discipline ou leur domaine d'études, prendront conscience des causes et des impacts du changement climatique et seront dotés des compétences nécessaires pour trouver des solutions locales novatrices à ce problème mondial.

Le projet TROP ICSU se converge ainsi aux Objectifs du Développement Durable des Nations Unies pour Education de qualité (Objectif 4) et Mesures relatives à la lutte contre les changements climatiques (Objectif 13).

L’équipe chargée de réalisation du projet TROP ICSU, basée à la Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Pune, œuvre à développer, rassembler, organiser et valider un répertoire des outils pédagogiques du monde entier qui peut être utilisé par les enseignants pour enseigner des sujets spécifiques à une discipline en utilisant des exemples, études de cas et activités relatives au changement climatique. Le projet a démontré l'approche pédagogique novatrice de l'intégration de l'éducation au changement climatique dans les programmes existants. Dans le cadre de ce projet, l'équipe a élaboré un grand nombre de ressources pédagogiques (dont certaines sont accompagnées de plans de cours détaillés, étape par étape) pour l'intégration des sujets liés aux changements climatiques dans le programme de base. Une méthodologie détaillée a été adoptée pour assurer la validité scientifique et l'intégration sans faille des thèmes du changement climatique dans les programmes scolaires. Ainsi, l'utilisation des ressources éducatives du TROP ICSU aidera les enseignants à améliorer la qualité de l'apprentissage tout en sensibilisant davantage les élèves au changement climatique, sans s'écarter du programme scolaire.

Les ateliers destinés aux enseignants ont été organisés dans un premier temps en Inde, au Bhoutan, en Afrique du Sud, en Ouganda, en Egypte, en France, en Autriche, au Royaume Uni, en Chine et en Australie par l’équipe du projet. Cela a permis aux enseignants locaux d’évaluer la pertinence des ressources proposées. Les avis des experts en domaine de changements climatiques ont également été recueillis lors de certains ateliers. Nous collaborons étroitement avec des organismes des Nations Unies tels que Le Partenariat One UN pour l’Apprentissage sur les Changements Climatiques (UN CC:Learn), l’Organisation météorologique mondiale (OMM) et le Programme mondial de recherche sur le climat (PMRC), qui ont non seulement validé les plans de cours et les outils pédagogiques, mais ont également approuvé l'ensemble du projet. L'équipe du projet a eu l'occasion de présenter ses efforts en matière d'éducation dans les présentations sur l'enseignement des sciences lors du 4e Forum des Nations Unies sur la STI 2019 4th UN STI Forum 2019 les 14 et 15 mai 2019 au siège des Nations Unies à New York et également au Forum politique de haut niveau High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019)  sur le développement durable 2019 (HLPF 2019) le 11 juillet 2019 au siège des Nations Unies dans une session intitulée " Pratiques et approches en matière de qualité dans l'éducation d'environnement et de climat "Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action. En outre, l'équipe a participé à des événements d'éducation climatique à la COP 24 en Pologne et à des conférences et ateliers pour les enseignants et les experts climatiques.

L'initiative du projet TROP ICSU répond parfaitement aux besoins urgents, comme en témoignent les préoccupations croissantes, en particulier chez les jeunes, dans le monde entier, ainsi que les mesures prises par certains pays, comme l'Italie, pour inclure ouvertement le changement climatique dans les programmes scolaires de chaque enfant.

La première phase du projet TROP ICSU (2017-2019) a bénéficié d'une subvention de trois ans du Conseil International de la Science (International Science Council (ISC)).

 

Credits

Translated from English to French by
Prit Pandya, Freelance Translator, Pune, India

Educação sobre Mudança Climática Através do Currículo Através do Mundo:

  1. Mudança Climática é uma das questões mais significantes do nosso tempo.
  2. Afeta o desenvolvimento sustentável e equitativo de todos os países e seus cidadãos.
  3. Soluções requerem que as populações estejam cientes aos seus problemas.
  4. Medidas para atenuar os efeitos das mudanças climáticas envolvem soluções localmente enraizadas, mas que sejam baseadas na ciência global.
  5. A integração da educação sobre mudanças climáticas no sistema de educação formal pode equipar as gerações atuais e futuras com habilidades essenciais para determinar soluções localmente relevantes para adaptação, atenuação e resiliência às mudanças
    climáticas.

O objetivo do projeto TROP ICSU (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org) é agregar os tópicos relacionados às mudanças climáticas no currículo básico da escola e da graduação, para aumentar a conscientização sobre as causas e efeitos das mudanças climáticas entre os alunos. O projeto TROP ICSU faz parte da visão de democratização do conhecimento, para que toda a humanidade invista seu talento, habilidades e ambição de maneira focada para lidar com os problemas das mudanças climáticas.

 

O foco principal do projeto é providenciar uma fonte confiável de recursos educacionais validados e com curadoria que integram os tópicos de mudanças climáticas no currículo principal do sistema de ensino formal. Essa abordagem garantirá que todos os estudantes, independentemente de suas disciplinas / áreas de estudo, tomem consciência das causas e impactos das mudanças climáticas e sejam equipados com habilidades para desenvolver soluções locais inovadoras para esse problema global.

Portanto, o projeto TROP ICSU alinha-se diretamente com os Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável (ODS) das Nações Unidas para Educação de Qualidade (Objetivo 4) e Ação Climática (Objetivo 13).

Para atingir as metas do projeto, a equipe de implementação do TROP ICSU, sediada no Instituto Indiano de Ensino e Pesquisa em Ciências (IISER), Pune desenvolveu, classificou, selecionou e validou um repositório de recursos de ensino de todo o mundo que pode ser usado por professores para ensinar tópicos específicos da disciplina, usando exemplos, estudos de caso e atividades relacionadas às mudanças climáticas. O projeto demonstrou a nova abordagem pedagógica da integração da educação em mudanças climáticas no currículo existente. Como parte desse projeto, a equipe desenvolveu um grande número de recursos de ensino (alguns com planos de aula detalhados, passo a passo) como prova de conceito na integração de tópicos de mudanças climáticas no núcleo curricular. Uma metodologia detalhada foi adotada para garantir a validade científica e a integração perfeita dos tópicos sobre mudanças climáticas com os tópicos curriculares. Assim, o uso dos recursos educacionais da TROP ICSU ajudará às professoras e professores a melhorar a qualidade da aprendizagem e, ao mesmo tempo, aumentar a conscientização sobre as mudanças climáticas entre os alunos, sem se desviar do currículo principal.

 

Na primeira fase do projeto, a equipe realizou workshops para professores e educadores na Índia, Butão, África do Sul, Uganda, Egito, França, Áustria, Reino Unido, China e Austrália. Nessas oficinas, os educadores locais avaliaram a eficácia dos recursos de ensino. Em alguns locais, especialistas em mudanças climáticas também participaram dos workshops e forneceram feedback. Fortes colaborações em andamento foram estabelecidas com organizações das Nações Unidas, como a UNCC: Learn, a Organização Meteorológica Mundial (OMM) e o Programa Mundial de Pesquisa Climática (WCRP), que não apenas validaram os planos de aula e as ferramentas de ensino, mas também endossaram todo o projeto. A equipe do projeto teve a oportunidade de apresentar seus esforços educacionais nos eventos de Educação Científica durante o 4th UN STI Forum 2019 entre 14-15 de maio de 2019 na sede da ONU em Nova York e também no Fórum Político de Alto Nível sobre Desenvolvimento Sustentável 2019, High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development 2019 (HLPF 2019) na sede das Nações Unidas em 11 de julho de 2019, em uma sessão intitulada "Práticas e abordagens sobre educação de qualidade para o meio ambiente e a ação climática"(Practices and Approaches on quality education towards environment and climate action). Além disso, a equipe participou de eventos de educação climática na COP 24 na Polônia e de conferências e workshops para professores e especialistas em clima.

A iniciativa TROP ICSU é muito oportuna, como é mostrado nos crescentes níveis de preocupação, principalmente entre os jovens, em todo o mundo, juntamente com as iniciativas de alguns países, como a Itália, de incluir abertamente as mudanças climáticas no currículo de todas as crianças.

A primeira fase do projeto TROP ICSU (2017-2019) foi apoiada por uma concessão de três anos do International Science Council (ISC).

Credits

Translated from English to Brazilian Portuguese by:

Translator: Douglas Sena Rodrigues, Unicamp student, SAE Fellowship
Reviewer: PhD Priscila Pereira Coltri, Director of CEPAGRI/Unicamp (Meteo and Climate
Research Center applied to agriculture) https://www.cpa.unicamp.br

 

ಪ್ರಪಂಚದಾದ್ಯಂತದ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಕುರಿತು ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ:

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯು ನಮ್ಮ ಕಾಲದ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಒಂದು.

● ಇದು ಎಲ್ಲಾ ದೇಶಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಅವುಗಳ ನಾಗರಿಕರ ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಮತ್ತು ಸಮಾನ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಮೇಲೆ ಪರಿಣಾಮ
ಬೀರುತ್ತದೆ.

● ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳು ಸಾಧ್ಯವಾಗಬೇಕಾದರೆ, ಜನರಿಗೆ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಯ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಅರಿವಿರಬೇಕು.

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳನ್ನು ತಗ್ಗಿಸುವ ಕ್ರಮಗಳು ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ ನೆಲೆಗಟ್ಟಿನದ್ದಾದರೂ, ಜಾಗತಿಕ
ವಿಜ್ಞಾನವನ್ನು ಆಧರಿಸಿದ ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಒಳಗೊಂಡಿರುತ್ತವೆ.

● ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆ ಕುರಿತ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣವನ್ನು ಔಪಚಾರಿಕ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವುದರಿಂದ, ಹವಾಮಾನ
ಬದಲಾವಣೆಗೆ ಹೊಂದಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವುದು, ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನು ತಗ್ಗಿಸುವುದು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಕಪಿಮುಷ್ಟಿಯಿಂದ
ಹೊರಬರಲು ಬೇಕಾದ ಸೂಕ್ತ ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಸ್ಥಳೀಯವಾಗಿ ನಿರ್ಧರಿಸಲು, ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತ ಮತ್ತು ಭವಿಷ್ಯದ ಪೀಳಿಗೆಗಳನ್ನು
ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಕೌಶಲ್ಯಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಸಜ್ಜುಗೊಳಿಸಬಹುದು.

ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಹಿಂದಿರುವ ಕಾರಣಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳ ಅರಿವು ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹೆಚ್ಚಿಸುವ
ಸಲುವಾಗಿ TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು (https://climatescienceteaching.org/; https://tropicsu.org/)
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆ-ಸಂಬಂಧಿತ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಶಾಲೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಮತ್ತು ಪದವಿಪೂರ್ವ ಹಂತಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಮೂಲ
ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದೊಳಗೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ಗುರಿಯನ್ನು ಹೊಂದಿದೆ; TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು ಜ್ಞಾನದ
ಪ್ರಜಾಪ್ರಭುತ್ವೀಕರಣದ ಆಶಯ ಹೊಂದಿದ್ದು, ಇದರಿಂದಾಗಿ ಇಡೀ ಮಾನವಕುಲವು ತಮ್ಮ ಪ್ರತಿಭೆ, ಕೌಶಲ್ಯ ಮತ್ತು
ಮಹತ್ವಾಕಾಂಕ್ಷೆಯನ್ನು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳನ್ನು ಪರಿಹರಿಸಲು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಕೃತ ರೀತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹೂಡಿಕೆ
ಮಾಡುತ್ತದೆ.

ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಔಪಚಾರಿಕ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸಲು,
ಅಗತ್ಯವಾಗಿ ಬೇಕಾದ ಪರಿಶೀಲಿತ ಮತ್ತು ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದ ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ವಿಶ್ವಾಸಾರ್ಹ ಮೂಲವನ್ನು ಒದಗಿಸುವುದು,
ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮುಖ್ಯ ಗುರಿಯಾಗಿದೆ. ಯಾವುದೇ ವಿಭಾಗಗಳ / ಅಧ್ಯಯನ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರಗಳ ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಾಗಿದ್ದರೂ, ಅವರೆಲ್ಲರೂ
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಕಾರಣಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಪರಿಣಾಮಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಅರಿತು, ಈ ಜಾಗತಿಕ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗೆ ನವೀನ ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ
ಪರಿಹಾರಗಳನ್ನು ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸುವ ಕೌಶಲ್ಯಗಳನ್ನು ತಮ್ಮದಾಗಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವಲ್ಲಿ, ಈ ವಿಧಾನವು ಖಚಿತ ನೆರವು ನೀಡುತ್ತದೆ.
ಹೀಗಾಗಿ, TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯು, ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ (ಗುರಿ 4) ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಕ್ರಮ (ಗುರಿ 13)ಕ್ಕಾಗಿ
ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಗುರಿಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ (ಎಸ್‌ಡಿಜಿ) ನೇರವಾಗಿ ಕೈಜೋಡಿಸಿದೆ ಎನ್ನಬಹುದು.

ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಗುರಿಗಳನ್ನು ಸಾಧಿಸಲು, ಪುಣೆಯ ಭಾರತೀಯ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಮತ್ತು ಸಂಶೋಧನಾ ಕೇಂದ್ರದಲ್ಲಿರುವ
(ಐಐಎಸ್ಇಆರ್) TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆ ಅನುಷ್ಠಾನ ತಂಡವು ವಿಶ್ವದಾದ್ಯಂತದ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ
ಭಂಡಾರವನ್ನು ಸಂಗ್ರಹಿಸಿದೆ, ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸಿದೆ, ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸಿದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದೆ. ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಗೆ
ಸಂಬಂಧಿಸಿದ ಉದಾಹರಣೆಗಳು, ಕೇಸ್ ಸ್ಟಡೀಸ್ ಮತ್ತು ಚಟುವಟಿಕೆಗಳನ್ನು ಒಳಗೊಂಡ ಈ ಅನನ್ಯ ಬೋಧನಾ
ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲವನ್ನು ಬಳಸಿ, ಬೋಧನ ಶಾಖೆಗೆ-ನಿರ್ದಿಷ್ಟವಾದ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಕಲಿಸಲು ಸಾಧ್ಯವಾಗುತ್ತದೆ. ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯು
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣವನ್ನು ಈಗಾಗಲೇ ಅಸ್ತಿತ್ವದಲ್ಲಿರುವ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ವಿನೂತನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ
ವಿಧಾನವನ್ನು ಪ್ರದರ್ಶಿಸಿದೆ. ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಭಾಗವಾಗಿ, ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ವಿಷಯಗಳನ್ನು ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ
ಸಂಯೋಜಿಸುವ ಪರಿಕಲ್ಪನೆಯ ಪುರಾವೆಯಾಗಿ, ಹೆಚ್ಚಿನ ಸಂಖ್ಯೆಯ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳನ್ನು(ಕೆಲವು ವಿವರವಾದ, ಹಂತ-
ಹಂತದ ಪಾಠ ಯೋಜನೆಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ) ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಪಡಿಸಿದೆ . ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದ ವಿಷಯಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ
ವಿಷಯಗಳ ವೈಜ್ಞಾನಿಕ ಸಿಂಧುತ್ವ ಮತ್ತು ತಡೆರಹಿತ ಏಕೀಕರಣವನ್ನು ಖಚಿತಪಡಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳಲು, ವಿವರವಾದ ವಿಧಾನವನ್ನು

ಅಳವಡಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ TROP ICSU ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ಬಳಕೆಯು, ಕಲಿಕೆಯ ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟವನ್ನು ಸುಧಾರಿಸಲು
ಸಹಾಯ ಮಾಡುತ್ತದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಮೂಲ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಿಂದ ವಿಚಲನಗೊಳ್ಳದೇ ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ
ಜಾಗೃತಿಯನ್ನು ಹೆಚ್ಚಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.

ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮೊದಲ ಹಂತದಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾರತ, ಭೂತಾನ್, ದಕ್ಷಿಣ ಆಫ್ರಿಕಾ, ಉಗಾಂಡಾ, ಈಜಿಪ್ಟ್, ಫ್ರಾನ್ಸ್, ಆಸ್ಟ್ರಿಯಾ, ಯುಕೆ,
ಚೀನಾ ಮತ್ತು ಆಸ್ಟ್ರೇಲಿಯಾದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಕರಿಗೆ ಈ ತಂಡವು ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳನ್ನು ನಡೆಸಿದೆ. ಈ ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, ಸ್ಥಳೀಯ
ಶಿಕ್ಷಣತಜ್ಞರು ಈ ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಂಪನ್ಮೂಲಗಳ ಪರಿಣಾಮಕಾರಿತ್ವವನ್ನು ಮೌಲ್ಯಮಾಪನ ಮಾಡಿದರು. ಕೆಲವು ಸ್ಥಳಗಳಲ್ಲಿ,
ಹವಾಮಾನ ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯ ತಜ್ಞರು ಸಹ ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಿಗೆ ಹಾಜರಾಗಿ, ತಮ್ಮ ಪ್ರತಿಕ್ರಿಯೆಯನ್ನು ನೀಡಿದರು. ಯುಎನ್‌ಸಿಸಿ:
ಲರ್ನ್, ವಿಶ್ವ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆ (ಡಬ್ಲ್ಯುಎಂಒ), ಮತ್ತು ವಿಶ್ವ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಸಂಶೋಧನಾ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮ
(ಡಬ್ಲ್ಯುಸಿಆರ್‌ಪಿ)ದಂತಹ ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಬಲವಾದ ಸಹಯೋಗವನ್ನು ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮುಖಾಂತರ
ಸ್ಥಾಪಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಆ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳ ಪ್ರತಿನಿಧಿಗಳು ಈ ಪಾಠ ಯೋಜನೆಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಬೋಧನಾ ಸಾಧನಗಳನ್ನು
ಮೌಲ್ಯೀಕರಿಸಿದ್ದಾರೆ, ಜೊತೆಗೆ, ಈ ಸಂಪೂರ್ಣ ಯೋಜನೆಗೆ ಅನುಮೋದನೆ ನೀಡಿದ್ದಾರೆ.

ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ತಮ್ಮ
ಶೈಕ್ಷಣಿಕ ಪ್ರಯತ್ನಗಳನ್ನು ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತಪಡಿಸಲು ಈ ಯೋಜನಾ ತಂಡಕ್ಕೆ ಅವಕಾಶವಿದ್ದು, 2019 ಮೇ 14-15ರಂದು
ನ್ಯೂಯಾರ್ಕ್‌ನ ಯುಎನ್ ಕೇಂದ್ರ ಕಚೇರಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ನಡೆದ “4 ನೇ ಯುಎನ್ ಎಸ್‌ಟಿಐ ಫೋರಂ 2019” ರ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿ ಮತ್ತು
ವಿಶ್ವಸಂಸ್ಥೆಯ ಪ್ರಧಾನ ಕಚೇರಿಯಲ್ಲಿ 2019 ಜುಲೈ 11 ರಂದು “ಸುಸ್ಥಿರ ಅಭಿವೃದ್ಧಿಯ ಬಗೆಗಿನ ಉನ್ನತ ಮಟ್ಟದ
ರಾಜಕೀಯ ವೇದಿಕೆ - 2019” (ಎಚ್‌ಎಲ್‌ಪಿಎಫ್) ಎಂಬ ವಿಶೇಷ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿ "ಪರಿಸರ ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ಕ್ರಮದ
ಕಡೆಗೆ ಗುಣಮಟ್ಟದ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣಕ್ಕೆ ಬೇಕಾದ ಪರಿಪಾಠಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ವಿಧಾನಗಳು" ಎಂಬ ಅಧಿವೇಶನದಲ್ಲಿಈ ತಂಡವು ಪ್ರಸ್ತುತ
ಪಡಿಸಿತು. ಇದಲ್ಲದೆ, ಈ ತಂಡವು ಪೋಲೆಂಡ್‌ನ ಸಿಒಪಿ 24 ರಲ್ಲಿ ನಡೆದ ಹವಾಮಾನ ಶಿಕ್ಷಣ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಹಾಗೂ
ಶಿಕ್ಷಕರು ಮತ್ತು ಹವಾಮಾನ ತಜ್ಞರ ಸಮಾವೇಶಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, ಕಾರ್ಯಾಗಾರಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾಗವಹಿಸಿದೆ.

TROP ICSU ಉಪಕ್ರಮವು ಬಹಳ ಸಮಯೋಚಿತವಾಗಿದ್ದು, ಪ್ರಪಂಚದಾದ್ಯಂತ, ವಿಶೇಷವಾಗಿ ಯುವಜನರಲ್ಲಿ, ಪರಿಸರ
ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಹೆಚ್ಚುತ್ತಿರುವ ಕಾಳಜಿ, ಮತ್ತು ಇಟಲಿಯಂತಹ ಕೆಲವು ದೇಶಗಳು ಪ್ರತಿ ಮಗುವಿನ ಪಠ್ಯಕ್ರಮದಲ್ಲಿ ಹವಾಮಾನ
ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನು ಬಹಿರಂಗವಾಗಿ ಸೇರಿಸಲು ಪ್ರಯತ್ನ ನಡೆಸಿರುವ ಕ್ರಮಗಳನ್ನು ಈ ಯೋಜನೆಯು ಪ್ರತಿಧ್ವನಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.
TROP ICSU ಯೋಜನೆಯ ಮೊದಲ ಹಂತವನ್ನು (2017-2019) ಅಂತರಾಷ್ಟ್ರೀಯ ವಿಜ್ಞಾನ ಮಂಡಳಿಯ (ISC) ಮೂರು
ವರ್ಷಗಳ ಅನುದಾನದಿಂದ ಬೆಂಬಲಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ.

Credits

Translated from English to Kannada by:

1. TROP ICSU Project Summary/Concept Note:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

2. Chemistry Lesson Plan on Carbon Compounds:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

3. Physics Lesson Plan on Blackbody Radiation:
Gubbi Labs, Karnataka, India

As a High School or Undergraduate Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about landfills and landfill gas emissions and their impact on climate.

Municipal solid waste ends up in landfills across the globe. Over time, with the decomposition of the solid waste, these landfills emit various gases such as methane, with greenhouse warming potentials. This lesson plan will describe landfills in detail and how landfill gases could contribute towards climate change. This lesson plan will also discuss how methane from landfills can be collected and used as fuel, thereby mitigating its effect on the climate.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Mudau Lutendo S., Ms Kasturie Premlall and Ms Masethe Mosima A., Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image: Landfills as one of the sources of GHG emission

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is municipal solid waste and what is it composed of? Classify the different categories of municipal waste.
  1. Explain what landfills are and list the pollutant gases that are produced in a landfill.
  1. Describe how landfills can potentially contribute towards climate change.
  1. How much does your country’s waste contribute to methane gas emissions?
  1. Discuss how landfill gases can be processed to mitigate climate change.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate,High school
Discipline Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Municipal Solid Waste, Industrial Waste, Hazardous Waste, Landfills, Leachate, Landfill Gases (LFGs), Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Methane
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere, The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation
Location Global, USA, South Africa
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40 – 50 min

Contents

Video

(~2 min)

A brief introduction to solid waste and landfills.

Go to the Video

Reading

(20 min)

A reading to describe in detail the different types of landfills and their compositions.

Go to the Reading

Reading (10 min) A reading to describe landfill gases (LFGs), with emphasis on methane, a significant greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites.

Go to the Reading

Visualization

(10 min)

An interactive visualization of sector-wise (including the waste sector) methane emissions in different countries.

Go to the Visualization

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Play the video, ‘A video about landfills’ by Meggie Stewart, Emory University, to introduce your students to the topic of landfills.
  2. Use the video to acquaint them with the basics of what municipal solid waste is, how it ends up in landfills, and what happens to it over time as it decomposes.
  3. Further, explain why methane is produced and emitted from landfills.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Discuss the topic of landfills in detail

  1. Use the reading, ‘Basic Information about Landfills’ by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss landfills and their different types in detail.
  2. Use the embedded links in text to discuss how landfills are classified according to the waste stored in them.
  3. Distinguish between Municipal Solid Waste Landfills, non-hazardous Industrial Waste Landfills, and Hazardous Waste Landfills.
  4. Elaborate upon Bioreactor Landfills that store organic matter and discuss the formation of leachate and landfill gases (LFGs) in them.
  5. Explain that landfill gases mainly comprise of greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide and that their emission from landfill sites can contribute significantly to climate change.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 3: Extend the understanding about landfill gases

  1. Use the reading, ‘Basic Information about Landfill Gas’ by the Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP)- EPA, to discuss the typical composition of landfill gases.
  2. Use the text and the embedded ‘diagram that illustrates the changes in typical LFG composition after waste placement’ to explain the formation of LFGs due to bacterial decomposition of organic matter in the landfills.
  3. Elaborate on how methane is produced from landfills and why its release to the atmosphere can adversely affect climate.
  4. Explain why methane is the more potent greenhouse gas compared to carbon dioxide.
  5. Use the text to explain how landfill gases can be used productively, thereby limiting greenhouse gas emissions from landfills and to mitigate their effect on the climate.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 4 : Interactive Visualization to explore the local context

  1. Use the interactive visualization, ‘Methane emissions by sector’ by Our World in Data, to discuss total and relative methane emissions for different countries and regions, from various sectors such as Agriculture, Land Use, and Waste.
  2. Use the bottom left tabs on the chart, to select for a country or region to visualize its sector-wise breakdown of methane emissions.
  3. The data for the displayed chart is also available to download as a CSV file.
  4. Use this visualization and/or data to comment on your country or region’s contribution to methane emissions from the Waste sector and therefore, its potential effect on climate change.

Go to the Visualization

As an undergraduate Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching the principle of thermodynamics and about thermodynamic processes.

A fundamental notion in Thermodynamics is a ‘Thermodynamic System’. A thermodynamic system is a part of the universe that is under study; the rest of the universe is considered the ‘environment’ for this system. The separation between the system and the environment may be real (like a wall) or imaginary. Every thermodynamic system has certain measurable quantities called state variables such as pressure, volume, temperature, density, internal energy, entropy, and enthalpy. In this lesson plan, students will learn about thermodynamics processes and their examples in the atmosphere that determine the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere.

This lesson plan will also describe how the thermodynamic stability of the atmosphere changes and how adiabatic processes affect cloud formation, a component of climate. It also includes an interactive simulation tool to enable students to explore the different types of thermodynamic processes in a gaseous system. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image: A thermodynamic diagram showing the stability of the atmosphere based on the dry (Γd = 9.8 K km-1) and moist (Γ= 4.5 K km-1) adiabatic lapse rates (Created by Britt Seifert).

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is a thermodynamic system?
  2. What are the thermodynamic state variables?
  3. Describe the different kinds of thermodynamic processes.
  4. Explain how atmospheric stability and cloud formation are affected by thermodynamic adiabatic processes.

Image: Vertical structure of the atmophere

 

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Thermodynamics, Thermodynamic Systems, Thermodynamic Processes- Isothermic

Isobaric, Isovolumetric, and Adiabatic, Lapse Rates.

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline, An interactive tool available in several languages
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(~20 min)

 

A reading that introduces various thermodynamic processes and provides a few exercises to understand them.

Go to the Reading

Video

(11 min)

A video lecture that explains how adiabatic processes and lapse rates determine the stability of the atmosphere and in turn, influence cloud formation.

Go to the Video

Simulation (20 min) An interactive simulation to explore thermodynamic processes in a gaseous system. This tool is available in several languages.

Go to the Simulation

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘First Law of Thermodynamics and some Simple Processes’ by OpenStaxCollege, BCCampus Open Education, to introduce your students to common thermodynamic processes like isobaric, isovolumetric (or isochoric), isothermal and adiabatic processes.
  2. Thermodynamic processes are representation of the change of the state variables of a system. They are usually plotted using any two state variables as the x and y axes.
  3. The most commonly used plot is the P-V diagram, where Pressure and Volume are the two axes. However, any two thermodynamic state variables can be used as axes in a ‘Thermodynamic diagram’.
  4. Use the examples given in text to enable your students to understand these processes and their variables better.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Extend understanding using the example of atmospheric thermodynamic processes

  1. In atmospheric sciences, the basic thermodynamic system studied is called the ‘air parcel’. As the name suggests, it is simply a volume of air with an imaginary boundary which separates it from the rest of the atmosphere.
  2. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is usually faster than the rate at which the air parcel can exchange heat with the surrounding air (environment).
  3. Therefore, most vertical motion in the atmosphere is approximately adiabatic. Using this approximation, we can estimate how much the air parcel cools as it rises in the atmosphere- known as the ‘atmospheric lapse rate’.
  4. Use the video, ‘Adiabatic Processes, Lapse Rates and Rising Air’ by Stephan Becker, Lehman College CUNY to explain the lapse rate in the atmosphere.
  5. Emphasize to your students how this is changed in the absence or presence of water vapour and thereby, affects condensation and cloud formation.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity

  1. Use the interactive PhET simulation, ‘Gas Properties’ by University of Colorado Boulder to enable your students to explore the different state variables for a given gaseous system. This tool is available in several languages.
  2. Instruct your students to use the simulation to create scenarios for different thermodynamic processes ie. Isothermic, isobaric, isovolumetric or adiabatic.
  3. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘Thermodynamics and P-V Diagrams’ by Paul Andersen, Bozeman Science as a guide for design and analysis of your customized classroom activity to explain thermodynamic processes involved in this simulation.

Go to The PhET simulation

Go to the Bozeman Science micro-lecture

As a Middle School or High School Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the Greenhouse Effect of the Earth’s atmosphere. This lesson plan will explain what are Greenhouse Gases (GHGs), what is the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of atmospheric Greenhouse
Gases, and how increased concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can cause global warming of the planet.

The Earth’s atmosphere is made up of several gases. It allows incoming solar radiation to enter and warm the Earth’s surface which then radiates energy back into space. Some gases in the atmosphere absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation and re-radiate it back to the Earth, thereby increasing Earth’s
surface temperature. These gases are called Greenhouse Gases and this warming is known as the Greenhouse Effect. Important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), water vapor (H 2 O), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O). Since the beginning of the industrial age,
increased greenhouse gas emissions have potentially led to global warming of the planet. This lesson plan includes reading and activity-based resources to teach your students about the Greenhouse Effect, Global Warming and the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of atmospheric Greenhouse Gases.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences or Chemistry.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the Greenhouse Effect of the Earth’s atmosphere?
  2. What are Greenhouse Gases?
  3. Explain the role of Greenhouse Gases in causing global warming.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle School or High School
Discipline Environmental Sciences, Chemistry
Topic(s) in Discipline Greenhouse Effect, Greenhouse Gases (GHGs), Greenhouse Gas Emissions,

Global Warming, Global Warming Potential (GWP)

Climate Topic The Greenhouse Effect, Introduction to Climate Change
Location Global
Language(s) English, one resource also available in  various languages
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 min

Contents

Reading

(30 min)

A reading that introduces the greenhouse effect, explains
what greenhouse gases are and describes their role in
causing global warming. It includes in-section questions,
discussion points and suggested activities for extending
students’ understanding of the topic. This document is
available to download in English, French, German, and
Spanish.
This can be accessed at:
Go to the Reading

(pages 7-9)

Simulation

(30 min)

An interactive simulation to explore the role of different
greenhouse gases and their atmospheric concentrations in
causing the greenhouse effect. This resource is available in
several languages including English, French, German, and
Spanish.

Go to the Simulation

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the section, ‘A. Understanding global warming’, pages 7-9 of the document, ‘IPCC Special Report “Global Warming of 1.5 0 C”- Summary for Teachers’ by the Office for Climate Education (OCE), France, to introduce your students to the topic of greenhouse gases and the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere.
  2. Discuss how the industrial revolution has resulted in an increase in the concentration of some GHGs in the atmosphere.
  3. Use the in-section questions and tasks to discuss the global warming potential of various GHGs.
  4. Further, use the document to emphasize how an increase in the atmospheric concentrations of such gases has potentially caused global warming of the planet.
  5. This document is available in English, French, German, and Spanish.

Go to the Reading (Page 7-9)

 

Step 2: Extend student understanding of the topic using an interactive simulation

  1. Use the interactive PhET simulation, ‘The Greenhouse Effect’ by University of Colorado, Boulder, to enable your students to visualize the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere.
  2. Use the simulation to show students how certain gases in the atmosphere absorb outgoing terrestrial radiation and re-radiate the energy back to Earth’s surface.Emphasize that this is the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere and increased concentration of these gases causes warming of the Earth’s surface.Instruct your students to explore different scenarios such as ‘Ice Age’, ‘1750’ (pre-Industrial Age) and ‘Today’ to visualize the effect of corresponding concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases on observed temperatures.
  3. Direct your students to adjust the concentration of different greenhouse gases and to note the corresponding surface temperatures of the planet.
  4. You may also use the ‘Photon Absorption’ tab in the simulation to help your students visualize the interaction of infrared radiation with different greenhouse gas molecules.
  5. This resource is available in several languages including English, French, German, and Spanish.

Go to the Simulation

This is an online course in Climate Change by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

The course is multidisciplinary in its approach and includes the current state of understanding of climate science and climate change, the latest developments in the field, societal impacts of climate change, climate change policies and governance, and impacts of climate change.

The online course video playlist includes:

· Introduction to Climate Science and Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Archives, Climate Data, and Climate Models (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Change: Past Records: Climate Change on Tectonic Timescales, Orbital Timescales, Glacial/Deglacial Timescales, Millenial Timescales, Historical Timescales (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Modern Climate Change: Global Warming since the Industrial Revolution (Raghu Murtugudde)
· Future Projections of Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Mitigation and Adaptation (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland and Malti Goel, Climate Change Research Institute)
· Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics (D. Parthasarathy, IIT Bombay)
· Climate Change Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making (Navroz Dubash, Centre for Policy Research)
· Climate Change: Impacts in India (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
· Climate Change and Impacts on

(a) The Indian Monsoon (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)

(b) Water Resources (Pradeep Mujumdar, IISc Bengaluru)

(c) Biodiversity and Ecology (Deepak Barua, IISER Pune)

(d) The Himalayan Glaciers (Argha Banerjee, IISER Pune)

· Teaching Resources and Pedagogical Tools (Rahul Chopra, IISER Pune)

Tool Name Climate Change Course
Discipline All Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Different aspects of climate change
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Type of Tool E-learning Course
Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India
Hosted at IISER Pune Science Media Center YouTube Channel
Link https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZbgNdSTyWDbHe1onWK9SULbPxCuAMi1Z
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

As a High School or Undergraduate Economics or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as outlined by the United Nations for nations to adopt and work towards, for a sustainable future.

This lesson plan will allow you to introduce the SDGs to your students, stress on their socio-economic importance and enable discussions on the efforts taken by governmental and non-governmental agencies of their nations towards achieving these goals. This lesson plan will also draw attention to how climate change may affect the efforts towards achieving the SDGs.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics or Social Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?
  2. What are your nation’s efforts towards meeting the SDGs?
  3. How is climate change intricately linked with sustainable development and the achievement of the SDGs?

SDG Dashboard

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Sustainability
Development Economics, Urban Economics
Environmental Economics, Inclusive Society
Inequality, Societal Resilience, Poverty
Well Being, Justice, Gender Equality, and Climate Action
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Location Global
Language(s) English, A tool also available in French, German and Spanish
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Video

(~2 min)

A video to introduce sustainable development and the UN defined Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Go to the Video

Teaching Module (allocated time will vary according to the topic/s under consideration) A teaching module to teach the individual SDGs in detail, as per the topic in curriculum.

Go to the Resource

Teaching Module

(~35 min)

A summary of an IPCC report on global warming and a list of classroom tasks to emphasize the link between climate change and sustainable development. This reading is also available in French, German and Spanish.

Go to the Resource (pages 20-21)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

Use the video, ‘What is sustainable development?’ by the United Nations (UN) to describe to your students, what sustainable development is and to define the different sustainable development goals (SDGs) as outlined by the UN.

Go to the video, ‘What is sustainable development?

 

Step 2: Develop the topic further

  1. Use the reading, ‘Sustainable Foundations- A Guide for Teaching the Sustainable Development Goals’ by the Manitoba Council for International Cooperation (MCIC), for a detailed study of the individual SDGs and to highlight to your students the socio-economic importance of each one.
  2. Use the first 6 pages of the text as a user guide to this document and to note the points to highlight while teaching the SDGs.
  3. Then, select one or more SDGs for consideration and navigate to the relevant pages to teach about them in detail.
  4. Use the ‘Reflection and Action Questions’ within each section to assess student understanding and/or to encourage classroom discussion.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Emphasize the link between climate change and the achievement of the SDGs

  • Use the reading, ‘IPCC Special Report: Global Warming of 1.50 Summary for Teachers’ (pages 20-21) by Office for Climate Education (OCE), France, to explain to your students the link between global warming and attaining the SDGs. This reading is also available in French, German and Spanish.
  • Use the text to discuss with your students the relationship between population, economic growth and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
  • Explain to your students climate change exacerbates poverty and in turn, a higher rate of population growth and the associated inequalities contribute greatly to global warming through increased GHG emissions.
  • Use the text to emphasize to your students that climate change can be detrimental for sustainable development, especially in developing countries and vulnerable regions.
  • Therefore, discuss how SDGs must be addressed in conjunction with the efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change.
  • Finally, use the list of tasks on page 21, to encourage your students to discuss their country’s efforts towards addressing the SDGs in the context of climate change.

Go to the Resource (pages 20-21)

As a High School or Undergraduate Physics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and Simple Harmonic Oscillators.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach your students about Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and simple harmonic oscillators and engage them in a hands-on activity to explore these concepts. Simple harmonic oscillations, that occur in stratified fluids due to the Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy, can affect the flow of energy within large scale systems such as the Earth’s atmosphere and the oceans by the displacement of parcels of air/water. This lesson plan will thus, explain how natural oscillations in the atmosphere/oceans with the Brunt–Väisälä frequency affect cloud formation, occurrence of thunderstorms, and internal waves within oceans and thus, affect the climate.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Physics.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM)?
  2. What are simple harmonic oscillators? Discuss an example.
  3. What is the Brunt–Väisälä frequency and how can it be used to predict cloud formations and the occurrence of thunderstorms?
  4. How can simple harmonic oscillations in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans be responsible for influencing the climate?

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Joy Merwin Monteiro, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Image to the Left : Simple Harmonic Motion

Image to the Right: Simple Harmonic Oscillations

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Physics
Topic(s) in Discipline Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM), Simple Harmonic Oscillators

Brunt–Väisälä Frequency, Archimedes’ Principle of Buoyancy in Fluids, Stratified Fluids, Density Gradient

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere, Climate and the Hydrosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(~25 min)

 

An introduction to simple harmonic motion and simple harmonic oscillators.

Go to the Reading

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(20 min)

A hands-on laboratory activity (Dancing Test Tubes) to demonstrate simple harmonic oscillation in a stratified fluid.
Video micro-lecture

(~4.5 min)

A video micro-lecture that describes how oscillations with the Brunt–Väisälä frequency in the atmosphere and oceans cause many natural phenomena that can influence Earth’s climate.

This can be accessed at:

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘Simple Harmonic Motion’ by LibreTextsTM to introduce the concept of Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) and its characteristics.
  2. Use the text to define terms such as period, frequency, amplitude and equilibrium in oscillations and to describe a simple harmonic oscillator.
  3. Introduce the concept of non-uniform force directed towards the resting position of an object using the simple system of an object tied to a spring tethered to a wall.
  4. Explain that when you pull the object, there is a force acting on it which pulls it towards its resting position and if you then release the object, it will accelerate towards its resting position.
  5. Discuss how the object oscillates in SHM around its equilibrium position with the opposing forces acting on it.
  6. Use the text and a solved example to also discuss the equations of motion for the SHM.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity to demonstrate Simple Harmonic Motion in stratified fluids- Dancing Test Tubes Experiment

Use this suggested activity to allow your students to visualize how a parcel of water/air can perform SHM in the presence of a density gradient.

  1. Take a large beaker (volume ~4 liters).
  2. Fill it with 2 liters of regular water.
  3. Prepare a saturated salt solution by dissolving ~0.5 kg of table salt in another container with 2 liters of regular water.
  4. Dip a glass rod into the beaker.
  5. Pour the saturated salt solution along the glass rod into the beaker. This is done so that the salt solution reaches the bottom of the beaker with minimal mixing with the regular water
  6. Now the beaker contains the heavier salty water at the bottom and the lighter regular water at the top.
  7. Fill 2-3 test tubes with regular water. Leave ~10% of the test tube volume unfilled.
  8. Invert the test tubes and insert them into the large beaker. They should sink to the bottom of the beaker. They should also have a small air bubble.
  9. Adjust the unfilled amounts in the test tubes so that all the test tubes do not sink to the bottom.
  10. Heat the beaker using a hot plate.
  11. After some time, the test tubes start oscillating within the beaker.

Classroom discussion:

  1. Ask your students to recall Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy of fluids- the force acting on an object immersed in water is equal to the weight of the water displaced by the object. Explain to the students that this principle works in any fluid -air, water, and lava.
  2. Ask students how the weight of water can be changed by adding salts, by heating/cooling. Explain that as ocean water is saltier at the bottom than at the top, it is heavier at the deeper levels than near the surface of the oceans.
  3. Therefore, if you move a small ‘parcel’ of water to the top from the bottom it will be heavier and sink. Similarly, if you move a parcel of water from the top to the bottom, it will be lighter and rise.
  4. Explain that this sets the stage for simple harmonic motion – a force that is always acting in the opposite direction of the displacement.
  5. Remind the students that initially in the lab activity, the test tube filled with regular water is heavy enough to sink to the bottom. As the beaker is heated, the test tube also gets heated and the air expands just enough to make them lighter than the salty water around them. The test tube then rises until it reaches the regular water near the top. The test tube is now denser than the water surrounding it, and it starts sinking.
  6. Explain to your students that the test tubes represent water or air ‘parcels’ in the ocean and atmosphere. In this experiment, the test tubes are displaced by heating the beaker and they begin to oscillate. This is analogous to the displacement of water or air parcels in Earth’s oceans and the atmosphere.
  7. Discuss how such a displacement can generate internal waves that result in the redistribution of energy within these systems.

 

Step 3: Extend the understanding of the role of SHM in redistribution of energy within Earth’s atmosphere and oceans.

  1. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘What causes stripey clouds?’ by Professor Mike Merrifield, University of Nottingham, to explain how SHM in the atmosphere cause cloud patterns, cloud formations and results in thunderstorms. The air close to the earth’s surface is denser than the air higher above - the reason why it is harder to breathe in the mountains. When parcels of air are displaced from their original position (maybe due to the presence of an obstacle like a mountain), they oscillate up and down. When they move upward, they become cooler and when they move downward, they heat up. If an upward moving air parcel contains water vapour, this water vapour condenses and forms clouds. The downward moving air heats up and does not form clouds. This forms a wave-like pattern of clouds that are visible quite often in the sky.
  2. Use the video to describe the Brunt–Väisälä frequency in SHM. The oscillation of air/water parcels depends on the rate of change of density with height and acceleration due to gravity. If the density decreases with height, the force always points to the position of rest and parcels exhibit SHM. If the density decreases rapidly, the oscillation is faster (can you explain why?) and vice versa. This frequency of oscillation is called the Brunt–Väisälä Frequency. In such a situation, the atmosphere is said to be stable. If the density increases with height, then the parcel always experiences a force upward. In this case, no SHM is possible and the atmosphere is unstable. In such a situation cloud formation and thunderstorms occur.
  3. Use this video to describe similar occurrences of SHM in the oceans where energy is obtained from the coasts, at the surface and from the ocean floor. Since the ocean is stratified, some of this energy is converted to SHM of water parcels. The energy contained in these movements results in the generation of internal waves that transport this energy to other parts of the ocean. These internal waves also transport plankton larvae from the deep ocean to the coasts.
  4. Conclude with a discussion on how such a redistribution of energy within Earth’s atmosphere and oceans, can impact its climate.

Go the Video What causes stripey clouds?

As a High School and Undergraduate Humanities teacher in English, you can use this lesson plan to teach literary analysis of a novel (climate fiction).

The recently recognized literary genre of ‘Cli-Fi’ is a valuable means by which students can engage with key concepts of climate change and sustainability. Such texts allow for rich interdisciplinary approaches to learning about the human impacts on the natural environment. This introductory lesson is intended to be part of a senior high school unit of 5-6 weeks, focused on the teaching of the Australian novel ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).

The story, focused on the experiences of the central character Laura, spans a period from 1984 to 2018; a time in which south eastern Australia experiences significant environmental events- floods, bushfires, drought-closely related to extreme weather events linked to climate change. While central themes in the novel relate more to family relationships, indigenous connection to land and personal identity, the impact of climate change on the natural and built environment in this region of Australia is a constant ‘character’.
Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Literature.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate fiction (Cli-Fi)?
  2. The literary analysis of a climate fiction novel.
  3. In the novel ‘Anchor Point’, how is climate change portrayed as a character.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Bernie McInerney and Emily Haegi, St Mary’s College, Adelaide, Australia.
Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline English Literature, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Literary Analysis, Character Development

Setting as Character, Creation of Place through Writing

Writing across Time, Visual Representation of the Structure

Climate Fiction

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Australia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
45 min + 4-5 class periods

Contents

Reading

(~30 min)

 

An introduction to the guidelines for reading and analyzing a novel.

Go to the Reading

Video (2.5 min) A video to introduce climate fiction as a literary genre.

Go to the Video

Reading and Discussion

(4-5 class periods)

The literary analysis of a Cli-Fi novel- Anchor Point.

Note: This activity requires the procurement of the book, ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).

An audio file of the author’s introduction of the novel can be accessed here: (12.5 min)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this comprehensive guide, ‘Analyzing Literature: A Guide for Students’ by Sharon James McGee, Kansas State University- Salina, to teach your students how to read and analyze a literary text.
  2. Use pages 1-6 of the guide to give your students an overview of how to read a literary text including ‘Strategies for Reading a Work of Literature’ and understanding the ‘Terms for Analyzing Literature’.
  3. Use pages 22-24 to explain to your students how to write a literary analysis of a novel.
    1. Use the given exercises in the section, ‘Exploring Your Topic’ as classroom discussion points and/or as topics for writing exercises during the literary analysis of the novel.
    2. Use the sections, ‘Cultural and Historical Perspectives’ and ‘Other Perspectives for Analyzing Literature’ for explaining the different perspectives in which a literary text can be viewed or analyzed.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Introduction to Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi)

Play the video, ‘What is Cli-Fi?’ by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, to explain to your students this new genre of writing- climate fiction (Cli-Fi) which is going to be the subject of literary analysis in this lesson plan.

Go to the Video

 

Step 3 : Reading and Discussion

(Note: This activity requires the procurement of the book, ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson (Affirm Press, 2015).)

  1. Introduce a Cli-Fi novel to your students by playing the audio interview of the author of the Cli-Fi novel, ‘Anchor Point’, Alice Robinson by Kate Evans and presented by Michael Cathcart (ABC Radio National). Use this tool to encourage your students to form initial ideas about the book and to bring focus on the characters involved and the setting for the novel.
  2. The audio interview and associated write-up, ‘Alice Robinson’s Anchor Point’ can be accessed here.
  3. Ask your students to read the book as a take-home assignment.

Class discussion of the book:

  1. In your discussion of ‘Anchor Point’ by Alice Robinson, focus on the experiences of the central character Laura that spans a period from 1984 to 2018; a time in which south eastern Australia experiences significant environmental events. These include floods, bushfires, drought which are related to extreme weather events linked to climate change.
  2. Stress in your discussions that while the central themes in the novel relate more to family relationships, indigenous connections to land and personal identity, the impact of climate change on the natural and built environment in this region of Australia is a constant ‘character’.
  1. Direct your students to do a literary analysis of the novel. Remind your students of the guidelines to do this as discussed before (in the first resource).
    1. Direct your students to use these guidelines to explore different aspects of the novel such as character development, setting as character, creation of a place through writing, writing across time, visual representation of the structure, and as an example of climate fiction.
    2. Discuss how ‘climate change’ is treated as a character in this novel. Finally, comment on how this Cli-Fi novel is a form of climate change communication.

As a High School or Undergraduate teacher of History or Social Sciences, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about civilizations, decline of civilizations or empires, and societal vulnerability to climate-related extreme events.

This lesson plan will help students to learn about Angkor and the Khmer empire—its history, the geographical boundaries, various rulers, the architecture and structures built during the period, culture (including religion and festivities), and possible reasons for the decline and demise of the empire, including climate-related extreme events. The activities will also help students to use 360 degree visualizations while learning about the significance of water and water systems in the life of the Khmer people.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in History or Social Sciences.

Want to know about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? Contact us.

A map illustrating in red the Khmer Empire c. 900 CE.

Angkor Wat Temple

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Describe the reign of Suryavarman II in the Khmer empire. What were his key accomplishments?
  2. Discuss the role of water and water management systems in the life of the Khmer people.
  3. What were the possible reasons for the decline and eventual collapse of the Khmer empire?
  4. Discuss the climate-related extreme events that may have played a significant role in the demise of the Khmer empire.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences, History, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Civilizations, Angkor, Khmer Civilization

Khmer Empire, Urban Design, Water Systems

Water Management Systems

Demise of Civilizations, Decline of Civilizations

Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards, Climate Vulnerability
Location Cambodia, Asia
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
75 min

Contents

Reading

(~10 min)

An introductory reading that provides an overview of the Khmer empire – its establishment, the rulers, the religions, the people, and the culture. It also describes the significance of Angkor, the construction and architecture of various monuments and structures, and the decline and collapse of the empire.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~20 min)

A more detailed reading describing the foundation of the kingdom, the Angkorean civilization (including information about the various rulers, the magnificent structures built, and conflicts with enemies), the long reign of Jayavarman VII, and a discussion on the reasons that led to the decline of Angkor.

Go to the Reading

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(45 min)

 

A classroom/laboratory activity that uses 360 degree visualizations, readings, and a map to explore Angkor virtually and to learn about the important role of water and water systems (canals, reservoirs, and tanks) in the Khmer empire. The three-part activity concludes with a discussion on the climate vulnerability of Angkor and climate variation as one of the causes of the downfall of the Khmer empire.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading “Khmer Empire” from the Ancient History Encyclopedia to provide an introduction to the Khmer Empire.
  2. Use the map to observe the geographical location and boundaries of the empire and discuss its modern-day equivalent location.
  3. Proceed to a discussion on the main rulers of the kingdom and their contribution.
  4. Provide an overview of the cultural and religious aspects, and conclude with information about the time period and events that led to the decline of the Khmer Empire.

Go to the Reading

Step 2: Detailed discussion on the topic

  1. Use the reading “The Khmer state (Angkor)” from the Encyclopaedia Britannica for a more detailed discussion on Angkor and the Khmer Empire.
  2. Begin the discussion with the Foundation of the kingdom and the perceived role and importance of the rulers.
  3. Read about the Angkorean civilization; further, discuss the reigns of various rulers (including Jayavarman VII), the cities that were chosen as capitals over the years, and the magnificent monuments and structures built in the kingdom (including the Angkor Wat temple complex).
  4. Read about and discuss the gradual decline of Angkor and the various reasons that could be attributed to this downfall.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 3 : Further exploration using a hands-on activity (Go to the Activity)

Use the teaching module “Water & Climate” from Virtual Angkor to help your students explore the history of Angkor and the Khmer Empire in a hands-on, interactive manner and to learn about how climate-related factors may have played a crucial role in the decline of this empire.

First, navigate to Theme One (Living with Water) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Ask students to play the video and to explore the 360 degree views to learn about the role of water in the Khmer people’s lives.
  3. Facilitate a discussion on Questions 1., 2., and 3. of this module.

Next, navigate to Theme Two (The Hydraulic City) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water-t2.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Ask students to play the video and to explore the 360 degree views to visualize the rice fields and irrigation system in Angkor.
  3. Ask students to study the map.
  4. Facilitate a discussion on Questions 1. and 4. to learn about the water and water features in Angkor, and the significance of water in the Khmer empire.

Then, navigate to Theme Three (Climate Vulnerability) of this module: https://www.virtualangkor.com/water-t3.

  1. Read the introductory paragraph.
  2. Navigate to the article “Climate as a contributing factor in the demise of Angkor, Cambodia” listed in this module (https://www.pnas.org/content/107/15/6748). Encourage students to read the section, “Climate and Societal Vulnerability at Angkor”.
  3. Facilitate a discussion on the water management system in Angkor, the barays, and the modifications to the water management infrastructure. Discuss the role of climate-related extreme events (droughts and floods) in the downfall of the Khmer empire.

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School or Undergraduate French language teacher or a teacher of French as a second language (intermediate or advanced level), you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach climate change-related French vocabulary through reading comprehension and listening comprehension exercises.

This lesson plan will allow students of the French language to enhance their reading comprehension and listening comprehension skills through activities that introduce French vocabulary related to climate and climate change. These activities will also help students to learn about impacts of climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in French language.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Practice and enhance reading and listening skills in French
  2. Learn and use French vocabulary related to climate and climate change through reading and listening comprehension exercises

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Language: French, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Reading Comprehension, Listening Comprehension

Climate Vocabulary, Climate Change Vocabulary

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Nova Scotia (Canada), Pacific Islands
Language(s) French, English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40 min

Contents

Reading

(~20 min)

 

An introductory reading (in French) that provides an overview of climate change, including its causes and consequences. It also briefly describes the projected impacts of climate change in Nova Scotia, Canada. Further, this reading lists commonly used climate- and climate change-related terms and their associated meanings. The document is also available in English.

French version of the Reading

English version of the Reading

Classroom activity: Listening Comprehension (20 min

 

An activity module based on a short interview (video format) in French that includes a discussion on the effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands. A set of exercises related to the interview is available for listening comprehension assessment.

Activity module for intermediate or advanced learners of French

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this reading, ‘Introduction aux changements climatiques’ by Clean Foundation, Canada, to provide an introduction to climate change to your students.
  2. Introduce new vocabulary related to climate and climate change through this text.
  3. If required, use the English version of the document, ‘Climate Change background info’ to explain the meaning of new terms and vocabulary.
  4. Discuss the projected impacts of climate change in Nova Scotia, Canada.
  5. Facilitate an open or group discussion on natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change to help students use the new terms and expressions.

French version of the Reading

English version of the Reading

 

Step 2: Listening Comprehension

  1. Use the activity module ‘La Communauté du Pacifique mobilisée contre le changement climatique’ from Apprendre le franҫais avec TV5MONDE to help your students to further enhance their vocabulary and to learn about the effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands.
  2. Play the embedded video (an interview in French) and use the given set of interactive exercises to assess listening comprehension and vocabulary.
  3. (If required, use the available transcript to facilitate better understanding of the content).

Activity module for intermediate or advanced learners of French

As a High School English Language teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach about the literary device of allegory and examine an allegory in climate literature.

This lesson plan will allow you to teach about the usage of allegory as a literary device, its multiple interpretations and its examples in literature. Climate change being an important issue of our times, has spawned climate literature in verse and prose. As part of this lesson plan, your students will analyze a contemporary fairy tale about climate change for its allegorical components.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is an allegory? Describe its role in myths and fables.
  2. What are the different types of allegories used in English literature?
  3. Comment on the use of allegory as a device to communicate about climate change.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline English Language, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Literary Devices, Allegory, Metaphors

Fables, Parables, Types of Allegory

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
40 min

Contents

Reading

(~15 min)

 

An introduction to allegory as a literary device through the ages and brief descriptions of its types and examples in literature.

Go to the Reading

Audio file and Visualization

(5 min)

 

An audio file that introduces an allegory about climate change by the author, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA. This allegory will be examined in the ensuing classroom activity. Also, a visualization that depicts the climate fact on which the allegory is based.

Go to the Audio and Transcript

Go to the Visualization

Classroom Activity

(20 min)

 

The reading of the above-mentioned allegory about climate change and a list of questions for the examination of this text for its allegorical components and interpretations.

Go to the Resource

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘Allegory’ by Encyclopedia Britannica to introduce the topic of allegory in English Literature.
  2. Use the text to define allegory and describe how it has been used in literary texts.
  3. Discuss how allegories are an integral part of fables, parables and myths.
  4. Use the reading to discuss about the works of writers who have used this literary device in the past.
  5. Describe the different types of allegories such as personification and symbolism.
  6. Finally, emphasize on the central idea or background information on which the allegories are based.

This can be accessed  here.

 

Step 2: Background information for the allegory to be studied in class

  1. Use the audio file from the report, ‘A Climate Scientist On ‘Slaying The Climate Dragon’’ by National Public Radio, Inc (US), to introduce the author of a climate change allegory (that will be examined in the ensuing classroom activity).
  2. In the report, the author Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA, reads a part of the story and explains the allegorical components of it.
  3. Use the report to provide your students with the vital background information about human induced global warming.
  4. Use the visualization, ‘Warming relative to 1850-1900’ by World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), to show that global temperatures are rising above the pre-industrial age levels and will continue to rise unless preemptive actions are taken to curb the anthropogenic causes of global warming such as greenhouse gas emissions.

Go to the Audio and Transcript

Go to the Visualization

 

Step 3: Classroom Activity: Examine an allegory on Climate Change (Go to the Resource)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Slaying the Climate Dragon’ by Kate Marvel in the Scientific American, to analyze an allegory on climate change.
  2. Direct your students to read the fairy tale closely and allow enough time for them to make notes about its allegorical elements.
  3. Use the notes to initiate a classroom discussion on different aspects of the story.
  4. Ask your students to draw parallels between the fairy tale narrative and the real-world scenario by listing all the perceived elements of climate change in the text eg. rising sea-levels, biodiversity loss, and extreme weather events.
  5. Finally, facilitate a classroom discussion using the following list of questions to assess student understanding of allegory as a literary device for communicating climate change.

List of discussion points: (adapted from Change Reflection Questions by ReadWriteThink.org)

  • Who in the text is facing change?
  • How does this character respond to change?
  • Do other characters provide help or advice for the character that is facing change? What advice do they give?
  • What does the character learn about this change?
  • In what way is this text a literary allegory?

As a High School English Language teacher, you can use this lesson plan to teach your students how to read and analyze poetry and to use these techniques to examine climate related poems.

In this lesson plan, students will be taught how to read poetry and identify elements such as theme, structure, and tone. Through this lesson plan your students will also be introduced to one of the most significant issues of our times- Climate Change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How is poetry read?
  2. What are the essential components of poetry?
  3. How is a poetry analysis done?
  4. How is climate change portrayed in modern poetry?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline English, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Reading Poetry

Poetry Elements- Structure, Tone, Theme

Poetry Analysis

Climate related Poetry

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location India
Language(s) English
Access Online. offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 80 min

Contents

A Teaching Module

(~30-40 min)

A teaching module that provides a step-by-step guide to reading poetry and analyzing its various components such as tone, structure, and theme. It includes several links to teaching resources and a worksheet for poetry analysis.

 

Go to the Resource

Classroom Activity

(~30-40min)

 

A curated list of climate change related poetry for analysis using techniques learnt from the previous resource. This list of poems is also available as audio recordings in the voices of celebrities.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the module, ‘Preparing for Poetry: A Reader’s First Steps’ by Jason Rhody, published by EDSITEment, National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), to take your students through a step-by-step guide to reading poetry.
  2. Follow the instructions to facilitate the students’ understanding of the techniques involved in reading and analyzing poetry.
  3. Use this teaching resource to also enable your students to learn how to prepare an essay about a poem.

Go to the Resource

Step 2: Apply the understanding in written and spoken discussions

  1. Choose one or more poems from the list of 21 poems, ‘’Our melting, shifting, liquid world’: celebrities read poems on climate change’ curated by UK poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy and published by the Guardian, to read in class.
  2. The poems can be downloaded, and copies prepared beforehand for classroom reading.
  3. You can also choose to engage your students further by playing audio files (mp3 format) of the chosen poems read out by celebrities- James Franco, Jeremy Irons, Ruth Wilson, Gabriel Byrne, Michael Sheen, Kelly Macdonald, Maxine Peake, Tamsin Greig, Ian Glen, and Iwan Rheon.
  4. Use the worksheet (from the first resource), ‘Preparing for Poetry’ by NEH to ask your students to analyze the chosen poems.
  5. Use the completed worksheets to facilitate a classroom discussion on the theme of climate change poetry.
  6. Further, encourage your students to employ the techniques learnt to prepare an essay on the chosen poem/s.

Note: In order to improve your students’ understanding of the climate change theme beforehand, you can give a brief overview using this educators’ resource by CLEAN Foundation, Canada.

The curated list of climate change poems can be accessed here.

Data Visualization of GHG Emissions

As a Primary and Middle School Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach your students the basics of data handling using climate data.

This lesson plan can be used to introduce your students to data handling, data representation and interpretation using weather and climate data of India. Climate change is believed to cause more frequent extreme weather events such as higher than average temperatures and increased rainfall/precipitation. This lesson plan will enable students to assess such climate variability by analyzing local climate data.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Seema Mittal, Pallavi Surana, Medha Vaidya, Anupama Anikhindi and Varsha Walke, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is data and how can it be represented?
  2. What is the data range of a given dataset?
  3. What is the temperature and precipitation range of a city for a selected month over a 10-year period?
  4. Does the climate data from your hometown show extreme weather events that may be linked to climate change?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Primary and Middle school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Data Handling, Data Representation and Interpretation, Data Range, Bar Graphs
Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location India
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Teaching Module

(~8-12 min)

A video micro-lecture that introduces the basics of data representation followed by a practice set.

Go to the Resource

Teaching Module

(10 – 15 min)

Video tutorials followed by practice sets on how to create and read bar-graphs.

Go to the Resource

Classroom Activity

(~10-20 min)

A classroom activity for simple data analysis using climate data of cities in India from the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD).

 

The IMD webpage for selecting climate datasets for various Indian cities can be accessed here

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the tool, ‘Representing Data’ by Khan Academy to introduce the concept of a data set to your students.
  2. Further, explain how this data can be sorted and represented in tabular form, bar-graphs, line graphs and so on.
  3. Explain how the represented data can then be interpreted by asking relevant questions.
  4. Use the given practice set of questions to reinforce these concepts.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 2 : Further their understanding of data representation using bar graphs

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Creating a bar graph’ by Khan Academy to describe how bar graphs are constructed to represent data.
  2. Navigate to the following tabs- ‘Reading Bar graphs’ and ‘Interpreting Bar graphs’ to enable your students to understand how bar graphs are used.
  3. Use the practice set of questions within the teaching module to allow students to apply their understanding of these concepts.

Go to the Resource

 

Step 3: Classroom Activity: Constructing bar graphs using climate data

A) Use the website of the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) to obtain climate datasets for selected cities.

B) Instructions to obtain climate data for Indian cities:

  1. Enter the name of the chosen city in the filter for ‘City Weather’ to obtain the current weather report.
  2. Click the tab, ‘Extreme and Climatological Information’ at the bottom of this webpage to obtain datasets for ‘Extreme Weather Events in the Current Month’ in the past 10 years, and a climate dataset for a 30-year period.

C) Conduct the activity with the data obtained as follows:

  1. Use the ‘Climatological Table’ on the webpage to make bar graphs of:
  2. Daily Maximum temperature (y-axis) versus months of the year (x-axis) and
  3. Mean Total Rainfall in mm (y-axis) versus months of the year (x-axis)
  4. A simple how-to video guide on making bar graphs using climate data can be accessed here.
  5. These graphs will allow your students to understand the annual weather patterns in different Indian cities.
  6. Explain what the data ranges are for both weather parameters. You can use these representations to describe the climate of a city.
  7. Now, use the data for a particular month eg. September, as a baseline and plot the corresponding data points (Maximum temperature and 24 Hours Highest Rainfall from ‘Extreme weather events’ table) for the past 10 years.
  8. Describe the data range, which is the variation of these weather parameters from the climatological baseline conditions.
  9. Facilitate a classroom discussion on any weather extreme events and the possibility of it being linked to climate change.

The climate data of Indian cities can be accessed here

Note: Teachers of other countries may conduct a similar activity using their local climate and weather data.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a Middle or High School English teacher or a teacher of English as a second language, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach tenses using climate literature.

Global warming is causing glaciers to melt thus causing a water crisis. Satellite imagery is used to record and measure these climate induced changes on the Earth’s surface over time. This lesson plan includes a reading resource that reports on the rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers over the past 40 years due to global warming. In the context of this lesson plan, this text can be used to identify different types of verb tenses and discuss their usage in English language.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by  Swaroop Gokhale and Sriparna Paulchoudhury, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are the verb tenses in the English Language?
  2. How are the different types of tenses used in the English language?
  3. Identify the different types of tenses in a sample text about climate change.

Image: Changri Nup Glacier in Nepal. Much of it is covered by rocky debris. The peak of Mt. Everest is in the background at left.

Credit: JOSH MAURER/LDEO , National Geographic

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle or High school
Discipline Language- English
Topic(s) in Discipline Verb Tenses- Past, Present and Future

Subtypes of tenses- Simple

Continuous (progressive), Perfect

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, Himalayas
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Video lecture

(~42 min)

A video lecture that introduces each of the verb tenses through simple timelines and demonstrates their usage.

Go to the Video

Reading and Classroom activity

 

(10 – 20 min)

An article on global warming induced melting of Himalayan glaciers that can be used as a sample text to peruse for identification of the different verb forms.

Go to the Reading

Note: An answer key for this text can be accessed here.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the video lecture, ‘Using Timelines to Teach Verb Tenses’ by Dr. Dianne Tyers, Advance Consulting for Education (ACE), to introduce your students to verb tenses in English language.
  2. Use the simple timelines described in the video lecture to explain how each of the tenses-past, present and future- can be used.
  3. Use the lecture to also elaborate on the different sub-types of tenses-simple, continuous (progressive), and perfect- and their usage in English language.

Go to the Video

 

Step 2: Apply the learning by perusing a sample text on climate change

  1. Use the reading, ‘Himalayan glaciers melting at alarming rate, spy satellites show’, by Stephen Leahy, National Geographic, to enable your students to apply their learning of tenses and their sub-types by examining this sample text and identifying them, as a classroom activity.
  2. Give your students handouts of the article and ask them to read it in pairs. Instruct them to highlight the verbs in the text and identify their tenses.
  3. As supporting material, an answer key is provided here for this sample text.

Go to the Reading

Note: An answer key for this text can be accessed here.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a Middle or High School French teacher or a teacher of French as a second language (basic or elementary level), you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach climate related French vocabulary and its usage in creative writing and spoken discussion.

Climate change is one of the most significant issue of our times. This lesson plan will allow students to learn basic French vocabulary related to the environment and climate change through reading activities. Further, it will enable them to apply this understanding in creative writing exercises.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in French.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by Deepali Godbole and Sarita Rokade, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Learning Goals

Use this lesson plan to help your students to:

  1. Learn French Vocabulary related to the environment and climate change
  2. Apply the use of climate related French Vocabulary in writing and in spoken discussion
  3. Understand how climate change is one of the most significant issue of our times

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Middle or High school
Discipline Language- French
Topic(s) in Discipline French Vocabulary, Creative Writing in French

Climate and Environment related French Vocabulary

French Reading Comprehension, Email Writing Exercise in French

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global
Language(s) French, English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50 – 60 min

Contents

Reading

(20 min)

An introductory reading in French for teachers that gives an overview of climate change, its causes and impacts. This includes a list of commonly used terms in climate related text and their associated meanings. This document is also available in English.

Go to the Reading (French version)

Go to the Reading (English version)

Classroom activity:

Reading Comprehension and Creative Writing

(30 min)

An activity module that includes the reading of an informal email in French that talks about the immediate environmental issues in the city of Nîmes in France and about global warming with an accompanying English translation of the same. Also included are follow-up webpages to revise the vocabulary used in the email, instructions for an email writing exercise and a grammar test to assess the learning.

(Optional: This resource also includes a video that talks about preserving the environment.)

Note: This video may not be accessible in all global locations however its transcript is freely available to download here.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use this reading, ‘Introduction aux changements climatiques’ by Clean Foundation, Canada, to explain the main points about climate change to your students.
  2. Use portions of the text, especially the list of climate related terms, to acquaint your students with climate terminology and their corresponding words and meanings.
  3. If required, use the English version of the document, ‘Climate Change background info’ to explain the meanings of the climate related terms.
  4. Ask your students to note the newly introduced French vocabulary for the subsequent writing activity.

Go to the Reading (French version)

Go to the Reading (English version)

 

Step 2 : Apply the new vocabulary in an exercise of writing and classroom discussion

  1. Use the activity module, ‘The environment- Writing’ by Bitesize, BBC, to conduct a series of classroom activities in French.
  2. Use the given email sample, ‘Environmental issues’ in French as a reading exercise for your students and use the corresponding English translation to explain the French text to them.
  3. Navigate to the next webpage, ’Writing about the environment’ to direct your students to do a writing exercise in French- a response email to the previously perused one.
  4. Besides asking them to use the ‘ideas’ given in the webpage to compose the email response, remind them of the climate related vocabulary acquired from the previous resource.
  5. Direct your students to use it in their email writing exercise by including points about climate change and how it affects them locally/regionally.
  6. Finally, use the tab for ‘Test’ to access an online test in grammar related to the topic of environment.
  7. (Optional: Use the tab ‘Video’ to play a video that talks about preserving the environment. Note: This video may not be accessible in all global locations however its transcript in French with its translation in English, is available to download here. This may be used for a role play exercise in French).

Go to the Activity

Video Transcript

As a High School or Undergraduate Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about mountains that comprise one of Earth’s major landforms and the factors that affect their climate. This lesson plan will teach your students about geomorphic characteristics of mountains, orogeny- formation of mountains through tectonic processes in the Earth’s crust and enable them to describe different types of mountains (such as fold and fault-block mountains) and major mountain systems of the world.

This lesson plan also includes a resource to explain how global climatic factors affect mountains and how mountains in turn, affect regional climate.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography or Earth Sciences.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan idea by Smita Kalvey, Vidya Valley School, Pune, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

 

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is orogeny? Where are most orogenic belts located?
  2. Compare and contrast between fold and fault-block mountains.
  3. How do global climatic factors affect mountain climate and how do mountains in turn, affect regional climate?
Jura Mountains, Neuchâtel canton, Switzerland

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Orogeny, Tectonic Processes, Fold Mountains

Fault-Block Mountains, Volcanism, Crustal Shortening

Heating and Thermal Expansion, Alpine-Type Mountain Belts

Andean-Type Mountain Belts, Intracontinental Mountain Belts

Climate Factors- Latitude, Elevation and Continentality

Climate Topic Climate and the Lithosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(~25 min)

A reading that introduces mountains and explains how they are formed or destroyed. It also describes different mountain types and various mountain systems of the world.

Go to the Reading

Video Lectures

(24 min)

A video lecture that explains how global climatic factors affect mountain climate and how mountains in turn, influence the local climate.

Go to the Video

Reading (10 min) A reading to describe the effect of climate change on mountains.

Go to the Reading

(pages 68-70)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Mountain- Landform’ by Peter H. Molnar, Encyclopedia Britannica, to introduce the topic of mountains and their geomorphic characteristics.
  2. Use the text to explain the tectonic processes that are involved in the formation and degradation of mountain belts.
  3. Describe different types of mountains such as fold and fault-block mountains giving suitable examples and explain the processes involved in their formation.

Step 2: Develop the topic of mountains further by describing their role in climate (Go to the Video)

  1. Play the video lecture, ‘Global Climate Drivers’ by Coursera to introduce your students to the role of mountains in global climatic conditions.
  1. Use the video lecture to first describe various global climate drivers such as the Hadley Cells and the Coriolis Force that can cause imbalances in temperature, wind and precipitation on the Earth’s surface.
  2. Extend this understanding by using the lecture and the quoted examples to explain how factors such as latitude, elevation and continentality of mountains influence the climate of different regions across the globe.
  3. Discuss how these factors affect mountain climate and in turn, how regional or local climates are affected by mountain belts.

Step 3: Dicuss further with a reading (Go to the Reading)

Use the reading, ‘Mountains and Climate Change- From Understanding to Action’, pages 68-70, by Thomas Kohler and Daniel Maselli, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), Bern, to briefly discuss the global geo-physical, biological and socio- economic effects of climate change on mountains.

 

As a High School Mathematics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach basic trigonometry.

Global warming is causing glaciers and ice sheets to melt thus causing sea levels to rise. The rate of sea level rise is a few millimeters per year. While this may seem inconsequential at first glance, it can produce significantly greater inland sea water intrusion over time especially in low lying coastal areas. This lesson plan will enable students to apply simple trigonometric functions to understand this phenomenon. Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Mathematics.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Chirag Dhara, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune.

(Image: Sea level rise and additional inland intrusion :Concept by Chirag Dhara, Graphic by Firstpost)

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How are trigonometric functions used to study triangles?
  2. How can trigonometric functions be used to study coastline retreat because of sea level rise?
  3. How much land would be inundated due to sea level rise in the next 10 years? And by 2100?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Mathematics
Topic(s) in Discipline Trigonometry, Sine Function, Cosine Function, Tangent
Climate Topic Climate and the Hydrosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(25 -30min)

A reading that introduces basic trigonometry concepts and trigonometric ratios in right triangles.

Go to the Reading

Visualization

(10 min)

An interactive visualization of the variation in sea level height from 1993 to present day, as recorded by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre.

Go to the Visualization

Classroom /Laboratory Activity

(15-20 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to use trigonometry to calculate how much the coastline has receded (and will recede in the future) because of sea level rise.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

  1. Use the resource, ‘Trigonometric ratios in right triangles’ by Khan Academy, to introduce the simple trigonometric ratios and their relation to right angled triangles.
  2. First introduce the basic trigonometric functions like sine, cosine and tangent, and how they relate to the study of triangles and circles.
  3. Then, discuss the trigonometric ratios in right triangles and how to use them to solve for unknown sides and angles. Use the embedded video to discuss several examples to enable your students to understand these concepts better.

Go to the Resource

Step 2: Discuss further

  1. Use the interactive tool, ‘Sea Level’ by NASA, to visualize the satellite observations of global sea level rise over time.
  2. Explain that global warming is causing the rise in sea levels due to the melting of ice-sheets.
  3. Emphasize that the sea levels are rising globally by an average of about 3mm/year.

Go to the Interactive Resource

Step 3: Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

Use the figure provided above in this lesson plan, ‘Sea level rise and additional inland intrusion’ by Chirag Dhara in Firstpost, to explain how sea level rise results in large-scale inundation of the coastline.

Use this depiction to explain to your students how trigonometric functions can be used to calculate the extent of land intrusion by the rising sea levels.

The gently sloping area adjoining the coast is called the Continental Shelf, where the average downward slope is only about 0.1o as shown in the graphic above. Recall the NASA estimate of sea level rise to be about 3cm in 10 years as noted from the previous tool. Now ask your students to calculate the coastline retreat because of sea level rise. Use the tangent trigonometric function to calculate coastline retreat.

  1. Discuss how the coastline retreat is disproportionately large for what would seem like a very small vertical rise in sea level.
  2. What could be the implications of rising sea levels on the coastal regions globally?
  3. How much has the coastline approximately receded since the 1850s to the present times?
  4. How much do we expect it to recede by 2100?
  5. Answer key: Sea levels have risen over 20 cm since 1850. Sea level is expected to rise further by 30 – 120cm by 2100 (Video; NASA’s Earth Minute: Sea Level Rise).

As a high school or undergraduate English teacher, you can use a climate change related spoken text to help you in teaching note making and summary writing, as part of English for Academic Purposes (EAP).

The lesson involves training students to listen to an academic talk carefully, make notes, and then turn the notes into a summary. This talk titled ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ by Per Espen Stoknes is about climate change communication.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Language, English for Academic Purposes (EAP) or Functional English.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, IISER Pune, India

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How do you make notes from a spoken text?
  2. How do you write a summary from notes from an academic talk?
  3. What, according to the speaker, are the primary obstacles to communicating about and engaging with climate change?
  4. What strategies can we use to communicate climate change more effectively and get people more involved?

How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming

Per Espen Stoknes |TED Global NYC

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergradute
Discipline English Language, Functional English

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Topic(s) in Discipline Note Making Skills, Summary Writing

Climate Change Communication

Rhetorical or Persuasive Strategies in Communication

Climate Topic Introduction to climate change
Location Global, England
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
75-90 min

Contents

Reading

(20 min)

  1. A brief introduction of Per Espen Stoknes, the speaker of the TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’, which is the primary spoken text used as teaching material for note making and summary writing in this lesson plan.  (Go to the Reading)
  1. A reading to introduce note making, and how it can be done for a spoken text. (Go to the Reading)
  1. A reading to explain how a summary can be written from notes. (Go to the Reading)
A TED talk video

(25 min)

A TED talk by Per Espen Stoknes, to analyze using note making skills first, followed by summary writing skills.

Go to the TED talk

Classroom Activity

(30-45 min)

A classroom activity of summary writing using the notes prepared from listening carefully to the Per Espen Stoknes’ talk mentioned above. This will be followed by a classroom discussion using a set of questions.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Begin with an open discussion in your class to make it easier for them to understand the context and content of the talk to be examined. Use the following questions for your discussion:
    1. What do you understand by climate change?
    2. What kind of news or stories do you encounter regarding climate change?
    3. As an individual, if you wish to convince someone of your point of view, what strategies do you employ?
  1. Use this discussion to help your students understand that the talk pertains to climate change communication, and that rhetorical or persuasive strategies in communication will also be discussed.
  1. Next, use the brief account, ‘Per Espen Stoknes’ by TED.com to introduce the speaker whose TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’, will be studied for note making and summary writing. Stoknes is a psychologist and an economist, and a member of the Green Party in Norway. He is the author of the book, ‘What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming’ (2015).

Visit the Resource

  1. Now, use the resource, ‘Note making’ by University of Leeds, to introduce your students to the concept of note making. Begin with an explanation of what note making is, and how to do it for a spoken text. Explain that notes are not complete sentences, but key words linked together so that the outline can retrospectively give the note maker a good sense of the entire talk. Further, explain that to prepare notes from a talk, they will have to listen carefully to the talk being examined; identify key terms, and the order of ideas; and note them in an abbreviated manner.

Visit the Resource

  1. Finally, use the tool, ‘How to Write a Summary’ by Lumen Learning, to introduce the topic of summary writing. Explain to your students what a summary is- it is a paragraphed text that recapitulates, in one’s own words, the main points and illustrative examples of the original text. Explain to your students that they are supposed to capture what the original text says in the summarizer’s own words but without commentary or opinion. The summary should include the title of the talk, the speaker’s name, and the topic, along with the key points, critical arguments, and illustrative examples. It should answer questions such as the what, why, and how of the text. Use the enumerated points in the text to further explain the salient features of a summary and discuss the format in which a summary is written.

Go to the Reading

Step 2: Watch the TED talk, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ and make notes (Go to the TED talk)

  1. Play the video, ‘How to Transform Apocalyptic Fatigue into Action on Global Warming’ by Per Espen Stoknes, in 4 parts. The reason for breaking this into parts is that each part forms one subsection of the talk, and the talk itself is about 15 minutes long, so for them to take notes for the entire talk at one go may be overwhelming.
  2. If your students are not very comfortable with the accent of the speaker or with the English language itself, you can slow the speed of the talk using the speed button on the link.
    1. Part 1: 00:00 – 02:00 minutes
    2. Part 2: 02:01 – 07:19 minutes
    3. Part 3: 07:20 – 11:25 minutes
    4. Part 4: 11:26 – 15:00 minutes
  1. Between each sub-section, take 3-5 minutes to check with the students if they can understand the talk and discuss what they are taking down in the form of notes. It is important to remind them to write down key words as they appear on screen, a few words to help them remember an example, and the primary argument being made in that subsection. If they have not understood a term, you may need to explain it.
  2. You may also put down these key points on the board in note form. This subsection-wise discussion should help them to fill in the gaps that they might have had from their own listening.

Step 3: Summary Writing and Classroom Discussion

  1. Play the video once more, but this time without any breaks. This will help them fill any gaps that they might have when they watched the video the first time or questions that did not get answered during the discussions. Once done, ask them to go over their notes.
  2. Then revise with them what a summary is. Now, ask them to refer to their notes and write a summary of the talk. For this video’s length, the summary will be about 600-700 words. It will be split into four parts (parallel to the breaks above), and therefore, will have a minimum of four paragraphs.
  3. Initiate a classroom discussion, using the following set of questions. During the discussion, encourage your students to make notes again.
    1. Why do we need more effective communication skills when it comes to climate change?
    2. What useful strategies does the speaker suggest for effectively communicating about, and engaging with, climate change?
    3. What is the significance of stories, according to the speaker?
    4. Do you agree with the strategies that Per Espen Stoknes suggests? Do you think these would be successful in other communication contexts?
    5. What does this talk tell us about human beings and their minds?

 

Homework assignment: Ask your students to write short summaries that cover the above points, using their prepared notes.

As a high school and Undergraduate English Literature teacher, you can use two of William Blake’s poems, both titled “The Chimney Sweeper”, to teach your students how to interpret poetic texts.

These poems may serve as an introduction to the genre of Romantic poetry that gained popularity during the Industrial Revolution. They emphasize labor conditions during the Industrial Revolution in England and include references to the effects of coal burning, thought to be responsible for global warming.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in English Literature.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, IISER Pune, India

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are some of the features of Romantic poetry?
  2. What differences do you see in these two poems by William Blake? Comment on the emotions evoked by them.
  3. Describe the state of child labor during the Industrial Revolution in England.
  4. Comment on the overlapping timelines of the Industrial Revolution and the period of Romanticism.
  5. What were the environmental effects of coal burning in England during the Industrial Revolution?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergradute
Discipline English Literature
Topic(s) in Discipline Analysis of Poetic Texts, Romantic Poetry

William Blake, Songs of Innocence

Songs of Experience, Industrial Revolution

Child Labor, Chimney Sweeper, Coal Burning, Soot

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate and the atmosphere

Location Global, England
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

William Blake (1757-1827): An English poet, painter, and printmaker

Art Movement RomanticismSymbolism  (Source : WikiArt)

Chimney Sweeper

Contents

Reading

(15 min)

Three brief readings to introduce the topic of Romantic poetry by poet William Blake during the Industrial Revolution in England:

  1. An introduction to the Industrial Revolution, especially in England
  2. An introduction to Romantic poetry
  3. An introduction to William Blake, a prominent English poet in the genre of Romantic poetry
Reading

(15 min)

A reading of William Blake’s, ‘The Chimney Sweeper: When my mother died I was very young’ for critical analysis- first of two poems to analyze using a list of questions.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(10 min)

A reading of Blake’s, ‘The Chimney Sweeper: A little black thing among the snow’- second poem to analyze using a similar set of questions.

Go to the Reading

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(15 min)

  • Part 1: A set of discussion points to compare between these two Romantic poems by William Blake.
  • Part 2: An interactive timeline of global carbon dioxide emissions from pre-industrial age to today, to discuss climate change due to extensive coal burning during the Industrial Revolution in England.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion of key terms

Before your students begin to analyze the two poems in question, there are three key terms that they need to be made aware of.

  1. Use this resource, ‘Industrial Revolution’ by History.com, to introduce the salient features of the Industrial Revolution to your students, with an emphasis on its origins in England.

Go to the Resource

  1. Explain to your students, the primary features of Romantic imagination and the evolution of Romantic poetry. Use M H Abram’s brief introduction to Romantic poetry, ‘Romanticism in M.H. Abrams’ A Glossary of Literary Terms (177-179)’, provided by Hansjuerg Perino, to help the students understand the concerns that occupied the Romantic imagination, and to give them a timeline that shows the overlap between the Industrial Revolution and the Romantic age.

Go to the Resource

  1. William Blake (1757-1827) was one of the most prominent English poets of the Romantic age. Use this reading, ‘William Blake’ by Poets.org, to introduce his life and times to the students. This will enable them to have a basic understanding of his experiences and persona before analyzing his poems.

Go to the Reading

 

Step 2: Reading and Analyzing Poem #1

Hand out copies of William Blake’s ‘The Chimney Sweeper: When my mother died I was very young’ (written in 1789), instruct your students to read it to themselves, and then have one student recite it aloud in class to get a sense of the rhyme and rhythm of the poem.

Use the following discussion points to analyze the poem in detail:

  1. What is the rhyme scheme in the poem? (Answer: six quatrains; 24 lines; AABB, CCDD…)
  2. The movement of the poem (Answer: first two stanzas are an introduction to the narrator and Tom Dacre; the next three stanzas are Tom’s dream; the final stanza is waking back to reality)
  3. The characters of the narrator and Tom Dacre (for instance, the narrator is so young that he speaks “‘weep” when he means “sweep”)
  4. What sensory effects and contrasts does the poem create? (colors like black and white, sunshine and soot etc.)
  5. The significance of the title.
  6. Poverty, child labor, and the use of coal.
  7. The role of family.
  8. The use of religion and religious symbolism in the poem (lamb, angels, heaven, god).
  9. Juxtapositions of life and death.
  10. The emotions that the poem arouses in the reader’s mind.
  11. What elements of Romantic poetry can be seen in this poem?

Go to the Reading

 

Step 3: Reading and Analyzing Poem #2

Follow the same steps as above to read and analyze Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper: A little black thing among the snow” (written in 1793).  In addition to the discussion points mentioned above, ask them to notice that the “King” (the British government) is also held culpable by the poet.

  1. What is the rhyme scheme in the poem? [Answer: 3 quatrains; AABB CDCD EFEF]
  2. The movement of the poem (Answer: first stanza is a conversation between an outside viewer and the narrator, and the other two are the narrator’s lament and indictment of the church, family, and king)
  3. The characters of the narrator (for instance, the narrator is so young that he speaks “‘weep” when he means “sweep”, his criticism of social institutions)
  4. What sensory effects and contrasts does the poem create? (colors like black and white, heath and snow etc.)
  5. The significance of the title.
  6. Poverty, child labor, and the use of coal.
  7. The role of family.
  8. The use of religion and religious symbolism in the poem.
  9. Juxtapositions of life and death.
  10. The emotions that the poem arouses in the reader’s mind.
  11. What elements of Romantic poetry can be seen in this poem?

Go to the Reading

Step 4: Classroom discussion to compare the two poems and on the impact of the Industrial Revolution on climate

Part 1: Once both the poems are discussed in detail, ask the students to compare the two poems. At this point, you can tell them that the first poem belongs to a set of poems called “Songs of Innocence” and the second to “Songs of Experience”. This is reflected in the change in tones and narratives of the two poems.

Discuss what elements do they find in common and what seems to have changed between the poems.

Part 2: Climate change discussion- Use the reference to ‘soot’ and discuss how large-scale coal-burning during the Industrial Revolution may have affected society at large. Explain that this was the beginning of an extensive use of coal for energy by humans. Further, explain that coal-burning resulted in carbon dioxide emissions that have since contributed to global warming, one of the drivers of

current climate change. Use the interactive slider, ‘Cumulative CO2 emissions, 1751’ by Our World in Data, to enable your students to visualize a timeline of country-wise carbon dioxide emissions since the pre-industrial age. Use this to initiate a discussion on the contribution of England’s Industrial Revolution to this emission data.

Answer Points:

  • Among the things that are common between the two poems: the character and occupation of the narrator; the notion of exploitation; the contrasts between black and white; unchanged conditions of poverty and labor
  • Among the things that have changed between the two poems: rhyme scheme; the first poem offers hope in the form of religion and hard work but the second poem offers no hope or escape; stark criticism in the second poem of church, religion, family, and government; the moral lesson of hard work in the first and of no redemption in the second poem.

Go to the Resource

 

As a High School History or Economics or Agriculture teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about the rise of agriculture and the concomitant rise of agrarian societies/civilizations. This lesson plan will show how Egyptian Civilization thrived with agriculture, the latter being important for present day Egyptian economy also and is now threatened by climate change.

This lesson plan teaches about how agricultural practices evolved across the globe and in Egypt specifically. It will show how Egyptian civilization rose around the Nile Basin and has always been dependent on agriculture for food security, livelihoods and for its economy. However, recent climate disturbances causing frequent flooding and drought in the Nile Basin has adversely affected agriculture and thus pose a threat to Egyptian society. This lesson plan includes a resource for students to understand the link between climatic factors and crop yield in Egypt and/or other parts of the world.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in History or Economics or Agriculture.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are agrarian societies?
  2. How did agriculture help in establishing ancient civilizations? Give examples.
  3. What was the socio-economic importance of agriculture in ancient Egyptian civilization?
  4. How does climate change pose a threat to present day Egypt’s food security and agricultural economy?
  5. How are agricultural economies in the world being possibly affected by climate change? Give examples.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr Moemen Hanafy, Dr Zakaria Fawzy, Dr Mai Allam, Dr Magda Mohamed, and Dr Hanaa Abdelbaky (National Research Centre); Dr Ahmed Fawzy Elkot and Dr Heba Essam (Agricultural Research Centre); and Dr. Alsayed Mashaheet (Damanhour University) Egypt

Nile River Basin, Africa (Image: MDPI)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline History, Economics, Agriculture
Topic(s) in Discipline Agrarian Society, Agriculture and Civilizations

Ancient Civilizations, Egyptian Civilization

Nile Basin, Agricultural Economy, Food Security

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Global, Egypt
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Reading

(10 min)

A reading to introduce the topic of agrarian societies, how they are formed and what are their characteristics.

Go to the Reading

Infographic

(5-10 min)

An infographic to show the rise of ancient agrarian civilizations including the Egyptian society.

Go to the Infographic

Reading

(15 min)

A reading that describes the significance of agriculture for Egypt from ancient times to the present day.

Go to the Reading

Infographic

(5 min)

An infographic to show how climate change could affect Egypt’s agricultural yield in time to come.

Go to the Infographic

Classroom/Laboratory Activity

(15 min)

An interactive teaching module to explore the link between various climatic factors and the crop yield of Egypt and/or different parts of the world.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘What Is An Agrarian Society?’ by WorldAtlas.com to define and describe agrarian societies.
  2. Use the text to describe various aspects of agrarian societies such as how they came about, what are their main characteristics, their modes of production, their socio- economic role, and present-day agrarian communities.
  3. Discuss the challenges faced by them including the threats of failed crops due to climatic factors.

 

Step 2 : Extend understanding of the importance of agriculture for the rise of civilizations

(Go to the infographic, ‘Agriculture & Civilization)

  1. Use the infographic, ‘Agriculture & Civilization’ by Khan Academy to explain the rise and establishment of a several ancient civilizations across the globe, based on agricultural practices.
  2. Discuss the particularities of these different societies such as their geographical locations, local weather conditions, and the crops grown.
  3. Use the examples in the infographic to emphasize on the importance of having fertile soils and an abundance of fresh water supply for the establishment of a successful civilization.
  4. Thus, explain that these civilizations were generally found in fertile river valleys like the Nile Basin for the Egyptians.

 

Step 3: Develop the topic further by discussing about agriculture in ancient Egyptian Civilization

(Go to the reading, ‘Ancient Egyptian Agriculture’)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Ancient Egyptian Agriculture’ by Joshua J.Mark, Ancient History Encyclopedia to discuss how ancient Egyptian civilization thrived in the Nile Basin.
  2. Use the text to explain how the Nile was instrumental in establishing the Egyptian agrarian society and was also important for trade and commerce.
  3. Explain how it became a part of Egyptian culture while several engineering innovations were developed to utilize the river’s water to the optimum for crop cultivation and animal husbandry.
  4. Use the text to describe the importance of agriculture for the rulers of Egypt for garnering wealth through barter and collection of taxes in the form of grains.
  5. Discuss how latter-day Egypt served as the ‘breadbasket’ for the Roman Empire and the subsequent Arab invasion.
  6. Finally, discuss how despite technological advances in major commercial ventures, traditional farming practices continue among the small Egyptian farmers and agriculture remains an important part of the country’s economy.

 

Step 4: Discuss the possible effect of climate change on present day Egypt’s agriculture

(Go to the infographic, ‘Climate & Agricultural Yields’)

  1. Use the infographic, ‘Climate & Agricultural Yields’ by World Bank to briefly talk about the possible impact of climate change on the projected agricultural yields leading up to the year 2050 in Egypt and several other countries.
  2. Use the tool for an enquiry-based discussion on what climatic factors could possibly affect the Egyptian agricultural economy.

 

Step 5: Conduct a Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(Go to the activity Agriculture’)

  1. Use the teaching module, ‘Agriculture’ by Open Geography Education, to enable your students to explore the role of climatic factors on crop yield in present day Egypt and/or other regions of the world.
  2. Use the tab, ‘Agricultural Patterns Assignment’ to follow a step-by step guide to explore the visualization tool (ArcGIS Online Map), ‘Agricultural Patterns’ to answer questions such as ‘What factors affect crop yield?’, ‘Does crop yield always depend on rainfall?’, ‘What role does temperature play in crop yields’, and ‘How does agriculture affect population?’.
  3. Use the Online Map to visualize the effect of various climatic parameters such as annual terrestrial surface temperature and annual precipitation on crop yields in Egypt and/or any selected region.
  4. Correlate these observations with non-climatic parameters such as population density and soil fertility constraints, to highlight the significance of altered crop yield due to climatic factors for the chosen region.
  5. Finally, use the observations to enable a classroom discussion on the possible impact of climate change on the agricultural productivity of a region.

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about river systems, the important aspects of some of the major river systems and how they may be affected by climate change.

This lesson plan can be used to teach about one or more river systems around the world; and their features that determine their significance for the region they flow through. The Nile is one of the longest rivers in the world and flows through 11 countries in North East Africa. This lesson plan includes resources to teach about its role in providing food and water security and in influencing the economies of these countries. This lesson plan also discusses the Nile as an example of a major river system affected by climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography or Earth Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are river systems? Describe their fluvial processes.
  2. What is the socio-economic importance of a major river system? Give examples.
  3. Comment on the significance of the river Nile for Egypt. How is it affected by climate change?
  4. How are the major river systems of the world being affected by climate change?

Nile River  (Image: BBC)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline River Systems, Fluvial Processes, Drainage Basin

Floodplains, River Deltas, Hydrologic Cycle

Evapotranspiration, River Nile

Climate Topic Climate and the Hydrosphere

Climate and the Lithosphere

Location Global,Egypt
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
40-50 min

Contents

Readings

(20 min)

Two readings to introduce the different terms associated with river systems and their fluvial processes.

Reading 1: River Systems

Reading 2: Fluvial Processes

Online Repository

(20 min)

A digital repository of information about major river systems of the world including the River Nile.

Access the online Repository

Video and Associated Reading (~5-7 min) A video and associated reading that describes the effect of climate change on the river Nile.

Go to the Video

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion 

Reading 1 : River Systems

Reading 2 : Fluvial Processes

  1. Use the reading, ‘River Systems’ by Canadian Geographic Education to introduce your students to the basic terminology associated with a river system such as river source, tributary, floodplain, meander, upstream, wetlands, and watershed boundary. This document can also be downloaded.
  2. Further, use the reading, ‘Fluvial Processes’ by Central Connecticut State University to describe the processes associated with the flowing nature of the river.
  3. Use the text to describe what the drainage basin of a river system is, and what its characteristics are.
  4. Explain the processes associated with river erosion and the transportation and deposition of eroded material.
  5. Describe the flow channel characteristics and briefly discuss strategies for river management.
  6. Finally use the set of review questions given in text to enable further discussion and to assess student understanding of the topic.

 

Step 2: Develop the topic further by exploring the features of some major river systems of the world

(Go to the Repository Rivers and River Systems)

  1. Use the webpage, ‘Rivers and River Systems’ by Encyclopedia Britannica to teach your students about some major river systems of the world.
  2. Choose a river system and navigate to different sections in the contents to teach about topics such as physiography, climate and hydrology, plant and animal life, people, economy, study and exploration.
  3. Encourage a discussion on what factors, for example climatic factors, could affect the normal functioning of the river system and what their implications could be.
  4. You may choose to specifically explore various aspects of the river Nile for better understanding of the effects of climate change on it, as discussed in the next teaching tool.

Step 3: Discuss the impact of climate change on the river Nile

(Go to the Video Nile faces greater variability )

  1. Use the video and associated news report, ‘Nile faces greater variability’ by David L. Chandler, Massachusetts Institute of Technology News Office to explain the impact of climate change on the river Nile, one of the major river systems of the world.
  2. This news piece reports on a study published by Prof Elfatih Eltahir and Mohamed Siam in Nature Climate Change.
  3. Use the tool to explain how the Nile basin now faces unpredictable drought or flood conditions due to a warming climate and that the variability in precipitation and evapotranspiration are influenced by the Pacific Ocean El Nino/ La Nina phenomenon.
  4. Further, use this report to discuss the future projections, mentioned in the study, of how such climatic factors could further increase the flow variation in the Nile.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School Biological Sciences or Environmental Sciences or Health Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about circadian rhythms and the factors involved in maintaining the circadian rhythm in all living organisms.  This lesson plan will discuss the impact of global warming on sleep in humans, which is as an integral part of their circadian rhythm.

This lesson plan will teach students about circadian rhythms and how they are important for the health and well-being of all living beings. Global warming is potentially causing a change in day and nighttime temperatures. This lesson plan includes resources to show how sleep is affected by higher nighttime temperatures and therefore, could lead to adverse impacts on human health due to a disruption in the circadian rhythm.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences or Environmental Sciences or Health Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are circadian rhythms? How are they related to sleep?
  2. What are the factors involved in maintaining the circadian rhythm in living beings?
  3. Why is the maintenance of circadian rhythms important for the health and well-being of individuals?
  4. How is climate change affecting sleep and therefore the circadian rhythm in humans?

Circadian rhythm

Image (Wikipedia)

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Alaaeldin Ahmed Hamza, National Organization of Drug Control and Research, Egypt.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school
Discipline Biological Sciences, Environmental Sciences

Health Sciences

Topic(s) in Discipline Circadian Rhythm, Biological Rhythms

Biological Clock, Photosensitive Ganglion Cells

Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN), Sleep Disruption

Sleep Deprivation, Light Sensitivity, Body temperature

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Global, USA
Language(s) English, Spanish
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
30 – 40 min + 1-2 days

Contents

Video micro-lecture (~2.5 min) A short video micro-lecture that introduces circadian rhythms and explains why it is important for living beings.

Go to the Video

Reading

(15 min)

A factsheet that defines circadian rhythm and explains its importance in influencing the physiology and behavior of humans. This tool is also available in Spanish.

Go to the Reading

Video and Associated Reading (~5-7 min) A video that describes a study about sleep disruptions in individuals in the USA because of higher nighttime temperatures due to global warming.

Go to the Video

Classroom Activity 

(1-2 days)

A set of classroom or laboratory activities to explore biological rhythms in living organisms

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Video)

  1. Use the video micro-lecture, ‘What Makes You Tick: Circadian Rhythms’ by Oxford Sparks, Oxford University, to introduce the topic of circadian rhythms.
  2. Use this tool to explain why circadian rhythms are important for all livings beings.
  3. Describe the role of photosensitive ganglion cells in the eye and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus of the brain, in managing the circadian rhythm.
  4. Explain that maintenance of the circadian rhythm in individuals depends on environmental cues such as light and that any disruptions can be detrimental to their health.

Step 2: Extend Understanding (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use this factsheet, ‘Circadian Rhythms’ by National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) to further your students’ understanding of circadian rhythms. This tool is also available in Spanish.
  2. Use the text to differentiate between circadian rhythms and biological clocks.
  3. Define what is the master clock of the body and explain how it is responsible for keeping the circadian rhythm in sync with body physiology and behavior.
  4. Explain that circadian rhythms are influenced by both natural (genetic) and environmental cues such as daylight and in turn are responsible for body function and health.
  5. Use the text to explain how the body’s master clock is responsible for establishing sleep patterns in individuals.
  6. Finally, discuss how disruptions in the circadian rhythm can lead to health problems.

Step 3: Discuss further (Go to the video and associated report)

  1. Use the video and associated report, ‘Scientists warn of sleepless nights in a warming world’ by Ryan Cross, published in Science, to describe the effect of temperature on sleep cycles in individuals in the United States.
  2. Use the tools to describe the findings of a study that reports that global warming and the accompanying higher nighttime temperatures have resulted in insufficient sleep and sleep disruptions in individuals in the United States.
  3. Discuss the findings that the groups of poor and elderly individuals were more severely affected by this.
  4. Further, discuss how the results of the study suggest that with the current and predicted rate of global warming, more sleep cycle disruptions could happen, leading to lowered productivity and health problems in a larger proportion of the population.

Step 4: Conduct the Classroom/Laboratory Activity

  1. Use the set of activities, ‘Biological Rhythms’ by University of Washington, to enable students to explore their own biological rhythms in an engaging manner.
  2. In the context of this lesson plan, direct your students to follow the instructions for ‘Experiment 1: The Ups and Downs of Body Temperature’ to investigate the body temperature rhythm.
  3. Ask your students to do an additional activity from the ‘reaction time’ set of experiments for the same time-points.
  4. Use the data collected to correlate the body temperature noted at specific time-points and the corresponding reaction times.
  5. Use the correlation, if any, to discuss how warmer temperatures due to global warming could in turn affect body temperature related reaction times and therefore, biological rhythms in individuals.

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School or Undergraduate Geography or Earth Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about landforms.  This lesson plan focuses on glaciers, glacier lakes and climate change induced glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs).

Use this lesson plan to teach your students about the formation and characteristics of glaciers, types of glaciers, and the effect of climate change on glaciers. Global warming is causing glaciers to melt rapidly, resulting in larger volumes of water accumulating in glacier lakes. In time, these glacier lakes burst their morainic banks resulting in GLOFs that cause widespread damage downstream of the glaciers. Globally, there are many potential hotspots for GLOFs. This lesson plan includes resources to show how the Himalayan country of Bhutan has been affected by climate change induced GLOFs and their methods of adaptation to avert disaster.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Geography or Earth Sciences.

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are glaciers? How are they formed?
  2. Describe the components of a glacier.
  3. What are the different types of glaciers?
  4. How are glaciers affected by climate change?
  5. Describe the threat posed by GLOFs.

Climate Change-induced Risks from Glacial Lake Outburst Floods in Bhutan

Image(UNDP: Climate Change adaption)

Teacher contributed lesson plan by Tshering Wangchuk (Dechencholing Higher Secondary School) Sangay Jamtho (Lungtenzampa Middle Secondary School) Zangmo, Tshering Pelden, and Tashi Choden (Changzamtog Middle Secondary School) and Sonal Choden and Munna Tamang (Rinchen Higher Secondary School), Bhutan.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Geography, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Glaciers, Glacial Landforms, Glacier Lakes, Moraine

Avalanches, Ice Shelves, Glacier Snouts, Snowmelt

Glacier Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs), Ablation

Accumulation, End Moraine, Terminal Moraine

Climate Topic Climate and the Lithosphere, Climate and the Cryosphere

Climate and the Anthroposphere

Location Global,  Peru, India, Bhutan
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(~20 min)

A basic introductory text to different types of landforms.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(20-30 min)

A resource that describes what glaciers are and explores many aspects of glaciers.

Go to the Reading

Video (~6 min) A video that describes the danger posed by glacier lakes in Bhutan and shows how the country is coping with the threat of GLOFs due to climate change.

Go to the Video (up to 5.45 min)

Classroom/Laboratory Activity (~15 min)

(15 min)

A simulation tool to show the growth and shrinkage of glaciers with climate related variations in mountain snowfall and temperatures. This tool is available in several languages.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

 

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Landforms’ by Southern Kings Consolidated School, Prince Edward Island, Canada, to define landforms, different types and characteristics.
  2. Use the links provided in the reading to introduce your students to landforms such as valleys, plateaus, mountains, plains, hills, loess, and glaciers.
  3. Click on ‘Games’ at the top of the page to enable your students to test their knowledge about basic physical features of the earth.

Step 2 : Discuss further (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use this reading, ‘All About Glaciers’ by National Snow & Ice Data Center, to teach your students about different aspects of glaciers.
  2. Use the tabs on the left side of the text box to navigate to different topics like how glaciers are formed, the components of a glacier, and the types of glaciers.
  3. Discuss with your students how glaciers affect people and what the dangers associated with them are.
  4. Finally, navigate to the section on ‘glaciers and climate change’ to explain to your students how warming temperatures have resulted in rapid melting of glaciers.
  5. Discuss how retreating glaciers have been documented using satellite imagery in various regions of the Himalayas, for example, the Gangotri Glacier.
  6. Explain how glacier lakes are formed due to meltwater from glaciers that gets accumulated behind fragile morainic banks at the snout of the glacier.
  7. Describe how increased snowmelt from glaciers greatly raises the level of accumulated water in glacial lakes, adding pressure to the morainic banks that are vulnerable to breaking down and causing GLOFs.
  8. Use the text to discuss the devastation caused by recent cases of GLOFs in Huaraz, Peru; Uttarakhand, India; and Lemthang Tsho, Bhutan.

Step 3 : Extend the understanding (Go to the Video)

  1. Use the video, ‘GEF -Bhutan: Silent Tsunami’ (up to 5.45 min) by Global Environment Facility to explain to your students the perceived threat of GLOFs for a largely mountainous Himalayan country like Bhutan.
  2. Use the tool to discuss past occurrences of GLOFs and the possible destruction of resources, infrastructure and livelihoods due to sudden GLOFs in the future.
  3. Use the video to discuss the urgent need for preemptive action against the buildup of glacier lake meltwater levels and explain how Bhutan has enlisted the help of international organizations to adapt to this need for action against the effects of climate change.
  4. Explain the disaster management strategies of installing early-warning systems like water-level sensors in remote glacial locations and the early release of water from the glacier lakes that show dangerous levels of snowmelt accumulation.

Step 4: Classroom/Laboratory Activity (Go to the Activity)

  1. Use this simulation, ‘Glaciers’ by PhET Interactive Simulations, University of Colorado, Boulder, to explore how environmental conditions such as temperature and precipitation affect the thickness, velocity and the glacial mass budget of glaciers.
  2. NOTE: This simulation is available in several languages.
  3. Encourage your students to vary these conditions and measure changes in the glacier using the instruments from the built-in toolbox.
  4. Use the in-built graphs to enable your students to visualize changes in glacier-length over time, the equilibrium line altitude against time, the glacial budget against elevation and air temperature against elevation.
  5. Use the sample learning goals to encourage discussion on the given points and enhance student understanding of the topic of impact of temperature and precipitation on the dynamics and nature of glaciers.
  6. Discuss how this is related to real-life scenarios of effect of climate change induced variations in global temperatures and precipitation patterns on glaciation globally.

Optional: Use the ‘Teacher-submitted Activities’ under the tab ‘For Teachers’ to explore more activities using this simulation. This will require a login/registration to access the teacher submitted activity plans.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School or Undergraduate Biological Sciences or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about ecosystems, biomes, food chains, and food webs and how the balance of an ecosystem can be disrupted by climate change induced insect outbreak.

Warmer temperatures and altered water availability due to climate change are causing unusual outbreaks of insect populations globally. This lesson plan shows how Bark Beetles (Mountain Pine Beetle, Spruce Beetle) destroy large swathes of forests, thereby disturbing ecosystems globally. Examples discussed in this lesson plan include climate impacts on the ecosystems of the forests of Yellowstone National Park (USA), Bhutan and Central Europe.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences and Environmental Sciences.

Teacher contributed lesson plan by Kinley Choden (UWICER), Kinley Dorji (RTC), Bhuwan Kafley (RTC), and Rachana Sharma (Pelkhil School), Bhutan.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

 

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is an ecosystem? Describe the components of an ecosystem and their functions.
  2. What are the roles of food and water cycles in an ecosystem?
  3. What are the challenges for an ecosystem? Discuss the role of climate.
  4. What are biomes and how are they categorized?
  5. What are food chains and food webs? Give suitable examples.
  6. How do bark beetle populations cause disruptions in a natural ecosystem?
  7. How has climate change influenced bark beetle outbreaks globally?

Bark Beetle (Image: Dr. Kaka Tshering Chimi Tshering, Bhutan)

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Ecosystems, Biotic and Abiotic Components, Biomes

Equilibrium, Resistance, and Resilience of an Ecosystem

Food Chain, Food Web, Producers, Consumers

Decomposers, Trophic Levels in a Food Web

Autotrophs, Heterotrophs

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60 – 75 min

Contents

Reading

(~30 min)

Two reading resources and a quiz within a teaching module that introduce ecosystems, food chains and food webs and describe their components and functions to maintain ecological balance in the natural world.

Go to the Reading

Video and Associated Student Worksheet

(25 min)

A video documentary (7.5 min) that describes the effect of climate change on the ecosystems within Yellowstone National Park (USA). This tool describes how bark beetles are responsible for disrupting a simple food chain in this ecosystem. The associated student worksheet assesses the students’ understanding of ecosystems and food webs and the effect of climate change on natural ecosystems.

Go to the Video

Visualisation

(~5 min)

An interactive infographic that shows the extent of Bark Beetle infestation in the harvested timber of Central Europe.

Go to the Visualisation

Reading

(15 min)

A resource that describes the strategies employed by Bhutan to predict climate change induced Bark Beetle outbreaks in its forest ecosystems.

Go to the Reading

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘What is an ecosystem?’ by Khan Academy, to introduce your students to the topic of natural ecosystems.
  2. Use the text to define ecosystems and their components.
  3. Describe the different types of ecosystems found in the natural world.
  4. Use the tool to explain how matter and energy is conserved in ecosystems.
  5. Further, discuss the stability and dynamics of an ecosystem- elaborate on the equilibrium within an ecosystem and how it responds to disturbances.
  6. Use the text to describe the resistance and resilience of an ecosystem, in response to disturbances to its equilibrium.
  1. Use another reading in the same resource, ‘Food chains & food webs’ to explain how food chains and food webs represent the flow of energy and matter within ecosystems.
  2. Use the tool to define producers, consumers, decomposers and to describe trophic levels within ecosystems.
  3. Explain what autotrophs and heterotrophs are and use the tool to describe primary, secondary, tertiary, quaternary, and apex consumers.
  4. Discuss the energy transfer within these systems and their limiting factors.
  1. Use the end-of-module quiz, ‘Practice: Food chains and food webs’, to assess student understanding of the topic of ecosystems and food webs.
  2. Use the associated links (video or textual hints) to enable students to answer the questions correctly.

Optional: Use the two video micro-lectures included in this resource to improve students’ understanding of the defined topics.

 

Step 2: Discuss an example of an ecosystem affected by climate change

(Go to the Video and Associated Student Worksheet )

  1. Use this educational resource, ‘Liz Hadly Tracks the Impact of Climate Change in Yellowstone’ by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Biointeractive, to discuss how the ecosystems of Yellowstone National Park, USA, are affected by climate change.
  2. First, play the embedded video (7.5 min) to describe the impacts of warming temperatures on forest ecosystems.
  3. Discuss, using the video, how this results in outbreaks of bark beetle populations that attack and destroy large areas of pine and spruce trees in the National Park.
  4. Explain how the destruction of these trees disrupts a food chain involving squirrels (primary consumers) and bears (apex consumers), thus upsetting the energy flow within this ecosystem.
  5. Use the video to describe how lowered water availability also affects aquatic biosystems that include amphibians in Yellowstone National Park.
  6. Use the student worksheet to encourage classroom discussion and to evaluate students’ understanding of the impact of climate change on food webs and ecosystems.

Step 3: Extend understanding of the extent of Bark Beetle infestation (Go to the Infographic)

  1. Use the interactive infographic, ‘Bark beetle ravages central Europe’s forests’ by Reuters, to discuss with your students, the extent of bark beetle infestation in the harvested timber from the forests of Central Europe, from the years 2012-2018.
  2. Ask your students to investigate the cause-effect of higher incidences of beetle infestation in the data represented and encourage them to find a correlation, if any, to the prevailing climatic conditions for those countries.

Step 4 : Discuss further using the example of Bhutan’s efforts to prevent climate induced Bark Beetle infestation 

(Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the technical note, ‘Predicting Bark Beetle Outbreaks using GIS, Climate and Phenology Data’ by Dr. Kaka Tshering and Chimi Tshering, Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environmental Research (UWICER), Bhutan; and University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria; to explain to your students how global warming has impacted the ecosystems in the forests of Bhutan.
  2. Use the text to discuss how frequent bark beetle outbreaks, amongst other reasons, have resulted in making many such ecosystems unstable.
  3. To counteract this, explain how studies were carried out to simulate spatial and temporal distribution of bark beetle outbreaks with rise in temperature: using GIS, climate and phenology data.
  4. Direct your students to read the entire document.
  5. Finally, encourage classroom discussions on how this information can be used to preempt bark beetle outbreaks and protect the susceptible forest ecosystems of Bhutan.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As an undergraduate Economics teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach the concept of Carbon Pricing and the instruments to implement it- Carbon Tax and Cap-and-Trade/Emissions Trading System (ETS). This lesson plan includes a resource to help students understand the importance of shadow price in the cost-benefit analysis of carbon pricing. This will enable students to understand how carbon emissions, one of the drivers of climate change, are affecting global economics.

The use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics.

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Megha Jacob, Jesus and Mary College (Delhi University), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute a Lesson Plan? CONTACT US

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Carbon pricing is used as an instrument for making climate policies. Explain.
  1. What is the difference between market prices and shadow prices?
  1. What is the importance of shadow pricing in evaluating the costs of greenhouse gases?
  1. In the context of climate change, what are discount rates, marginal abatement costs and statistical value of life?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax

Emissions Trading System (ETS), Cost-Benefit Analysis

Shadow Price, Market Price, Social Cost, Marginal Abatement Cost

Discount Rate, Stabilization Goals, Internal Carbon Pricing, Externalities

Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change

Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
90-100 min

Contents

Reading

(~25 min)

A reading to introduce and describe in detail, the different aspects of global carbon pricing and its importance as an instrument for climate policies.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(40-50 min)

A reading to introduce the topic of Shadow and Market Prices and to explain concepts such as Social Cost of Carbon (SCC), Shadow Price of Carbon (SPC), and Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) in the context of internal carbon pricing in the UK.

Go to the Reading

Classroom /Laboratory Activity

(~25 min)

An interactive visualization tool with map, data and downloadable graphs to understand the carbon pricing initiatives of various nations over a thirty-year timeline.

Go to the Activity

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Carbon Pricing Dashboard’ by World Bank to introduce the topic of carbon pricing.
  2. Play the embedded video, “Climate Countdown: Carbon Pricing” by Connect4Climate (~5 min), to explain the importance of carbon pricing.
  3. Use the sub-sections in the reading resource to describe what is carbon pricing, what are the main types of carbon pricing, and why it is important for governmental or organizational policy making.
  4. Use the text to also distinguish between international and national/subnational/regional carbon pricing.
  5. Finally, introduce the concept of internal carbon pricing and the factors that determine it.

 

Step 2: Extend the understanding (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘The Social Cost of Carbon and the Shadow Price of Carbon: what they are, and how to use them in economic appraisal in the UK’ by Richard Price and Simeon Thornton and Stephen Nelson, Economics Group, Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra), London, to introduce the concepts of shadow prices and market prices and explain the link between them.
  2. Use this paper to explain the need for climate informed policies in the economic assessment of a country.
  3. Given its significance in greenhouse gas emissions, use carbon as an example to explain the social costs of carbon and its shadow price in internal carbon pricing.
  4. Further, compare the marginal abatement costs and social costs of carbon for different stabilization goals as determined by the Stern Review.
  5. Finally, introduce the concept of discounting and discount rates for calculating carbon prices.
  6. This reading uses the United Kingdom (UK) as the area of study but this reading can be discussed in the context of other regions.

 

Step 3: Classroom/Laboratory Activity (Go to the Carbon Pricing Dashboard)

  1. Use the interactive map and data, ‘Carbon Pricing Dashboard- Map & Data’ by World Bank, to visualize the information available on the carbon pricing initiatives implemented by several nations over the past thirty years.
  2. Use the tabs to navigate to data available on the greenhouse gas emissions, the carbon prices implemented across different countries and the value of the carbon pricing initiatives selected (ETS or Carbon Tax).
  3. Encourage your students to explore different regions or countries, download the data/graphs on their carbon pricing data and draw comparisons to improve understanding of the real-world scenario of carbon pricing across various geographies.

 

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As an Undergraduate Environmental Sciences or Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about ecological niches- their characteristics and the factors that affect them- and the biogeography of a species. More specifically, this lesson plan will teach your students about the implications of climate-induced disturbed ecosystems on the ecological niches and the biogeographical distribution of Mountain Gorillas; and about the scientific strategies employed to prevent this and thereby, aid in their conservation.

Mountain Gorillas inhabit sub-montane and montane habitats in two regions of Central Africa- the Bwindi and the Virunga areas bordering the countries of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda and Uganda. These isolated populations are effectively ecological islands, as the lower reaches of these regions are inhabited by rural communities. Environmental degradation due to climate change and anthropogenic activities is severely affecting the natural dietary and ranging patterns of Mountain Gorillas, and thereby endangering their survival in the wild. This lesson plan includes resources to help understand these issues.

The lesson plan will describe how Bamboo, their preferred food and an integral component of their diet, is now extensively being planted in Uganda to restore degraded forest ecosystems and provide resources for sustainable living and economically viable livelihoods to local human settlements. Thus, Bamboo cultivation helps in restoring the natural habitat and provides sustainable livelihoods to local communities and thereby, help to conserve Mountain Gorillas.

This lesson plan, thus, allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Environmental Sciences or Biological Sciences (Conservation of Endangered Species).

A Teacher contributed lesson plan by Lukato Denis and Nandala Isaac Fred (Nyabyeya Forestry College); Dr Catherine A Masao (Institute of Resource Assessment, University of Dar es Salaam); Marceline Kabanzira (AUC); Sheba Ndagire (UAIA); and Rashedah Agero (Msitu Institute, Uganda).

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is an ecological niche? Describe the factors affecting it.
  2. What is the biogeography of a species? Explain how it can be affected by climate related factors.
  3. Describe the ecological niche occupied by Mountain Gorillas in Central Africa.
  4. How can the Mountain Gorillas of Central Africa be affected by climate change?
  5. Explain how extensive planting of Bamboo in Uganda can contribute towards Mountain Gorilla Conservation in Africa.
  6. Using the example of integrated Bamboo planting as a supplement to natural resources, explain how a scientifically well-planned program could help achieve the United Nations defined Sustainable Developmental Goals (SDGs).

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Environmental Sciences, Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Ecological Niche, Biogeography, Habitat Use

Species Distribution, Dietary Habits, Ranging Patterns

Group Sizes, Feeding Competition, Reproductive Strategies

Habitat Degradation, Bamboo Plantation, Mountain Gorillas, Conservation

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere

Climate and the Anthroposphere

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
70 min

Contents

Reading

(~15 min)

A reading to define and introduce the topic of ecological niches and the biogeography of a species. It also explains how ecological niches determine the stability of ecosystems and the biodiversity of a region.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(25 min)

A reading that describes how climatic and non-climatic anthropogenic factors can affect the natural ecosystems and biodiversity of Uganda.

Go to the Reading

page 10, 11,12, section 2.2 & 2.3

Readings

(~15 min)

A case study of climate-induced habitat changes for Mountain Gorillas in Uganda that is putting their survival at risk.

Go to the Reading

Page 21, Box 5

Reading

(~10 min

A reading to describe the climate adaptation strategies outlined for Mountain Gorilla conservation, ecosystems restoration, and the provision of livelihoods in Uganda, Rwanda and DRC.

Go to the Reading

page 45, 46 & 47, section 9.8

Reading  and Associated Audio

(~5 min)

(~10 min

A brief reading and an associated audio file that describes how Bamboo planting can be useful for Mountain Gorilla conservation.

Reading and Associated Audio File

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use this reading, ‘Ecological niches’ by Britannica.com, to define the ecological niche of a species, describe its characteristics and explain the factors involved in defining it.
  2. Use the examples given in the text to explain how natural selection works on the physical and biological constraints of a species in a given environment, and thereby determines the ‘niche’ that it occupies within elaborate ecosystems.
  3. Discuss how this ‘niche’ cannot be shared with another species competing for the same resources.
  4. Further, discuss how the biodiversity of a region is defined by these ecological niches that permit a wide variety of species to coexist with a finite set of resources.
  1. Navigate to the section on ‘Biogeographic aspects of biodiversity’ and use it to define the biogeography of a species.
  2. Use the embedded link to help explain ‘island biogeography’ and to describe the factors involved in the colonization of this controlled area of study, by different species of flora and fauna.
  3. Explain how isolated land areas like mountaintops and fragmented forests also follow the rules of island biogeography for species colonization.
  4. Discuss the examples given in the text to support this theory.

 

Step 2: Develop the topic further to discuss the influence of climate change on the biodiversity of Uganda

(Go to the Reading) page 10, 11,12, section 2.2 & 2.3

  1. Use section 2.2, page 10 and 11, of the reading, ‘Climate Change and Biodiversity in Uganda’ by Climatelinks (USAID), to discuss how a changing climate is likely to influence the natural ecosystems of Uganda.
    1. Use the points enumerated to describe different scenarios of climate change and the subsequent disruptions in the ecological balance between species and the flora and fauna distribution in Uganda.
    2. Discuss how these disturbances could affect the ecological niches occupied by various species and their abilities to adapt to such changes within a short span of time.

2. Use section 2.3, page 12, of the same reading to also describe the possible effects of non-climatic (anthropogenic) factors on Uganda’s biodiversity and ecosystems.

3. Explain how the effect of these factors may be exacerbated by climate related factors: for example, droughts leading to exploitation and agricultural expansion into forest habitats.

Step 3: Discuss the case study of the effect of climate change on Mountain Gorillas in Uganda

(Go to the Reading )Page 21, Box 5

  1. Use the reading, ‘Box 5: Mountain gorillas in the Virunga mountains face new threats as their habitat changes’ on page 21 from ‘Wildlife in a changing climate’ by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), to discuss the case study of how climate change and anthropogenic activities are affecting the natural habitat and range distribution of Mountain Gorillas in Africa.
  2. They are geographically isolated in two populations in the Bwindi and the Mgahinga National Parks and are restricted to the higher reaches of the volcanic mountaintops. Surrounded by rural communities that are heavily dependent on forest resources at the lower altitudes, these gorilla populations are an ‘archipelago of ecological islands’ and therefore, highly vulnerable to ecological disturbances. They occupy different ecological niches in these forest ecosystems. Bamboo stands are highly sought after by the Virunga Gorillas for their tender shoots and high protein content while the Bwindi Gorillas eat more fruit and are arboreal. In season, Bamboo forms nearly 90% of the Mountain Gorilla’s diet. Nevertheless, Mountain Gorillas feed across a wide variety of plants that helps towards the rich biodiversity and maintenance of healthy ecosystems in these regions (For more information on their habits, feeding and ranging patterns, check the additional resources section of this lesson plan). However, warmer temperatures and change in precipitation patterns affect the vegetation and thus, the habits of these mammals.
  3. Apply the understanding from the previous section to explain how climate and non-climate stressors can affect the ecological balance and thus, the natural feeding and ranging patterns of the Mountain Gorillas.
  4. Explain that increased temperatures may move the growth of vegetation to higher altitudes and force them to inhabit higher areas. However, due to the tapering nature of the mountaintops, Gorilla habitat gets further restricted.
  5. Discuss how climate induced shifting bamboo cover not only adversely affects food availability for the Gorillas but also resource availability for people dependent on it thus, bringing them in direct conflict with each other.
  6. Further, explain that changing climatic conditions and heavy reliance on forest resources by humans has resulted in large scale habitat degradation putting further constraints on the physical and biological well-being of the species, making them more vulnerable to climate change.

 

Step 4: Improve understanding of the Mountain Gorillas’ habitat degradation due to climate related factors (Go to the Reading) page 45, 46 & 47, section 9.8

  1. Use the reading, ‘Case #8 Mountain Gorillas, Ecosystem Services and Local Livelihoods in Rwanda, Uganda and DRC’, section 9.8, pages 45-47 of the report, ‘BIODIVERSITY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT- HARNESSING SYNERGIES AND CELEBRATING SUCCESSES’ by Guy Midgley et al, provided by UNFCC, to discuss the implications of climate change on Mountain Gorillas and the livelihoods of local communities in the Virunga region.
  2. Initiate classroom discussions on the findings of the report that mainly point towards restoration of Gorilla habitat through reforestation efforts for Gorilla conservation.
  3. Also, explain how the burden on forest resources due to human activity, can be reduced by using alternative resources like fast growing renewable Bamboo plants that can be creatively harnessed for sustainable living and for providing livelihoods in local communities.
  4. Finally, discuss how large-scale Bamboo planting could not only provide adequate food for Gorillas but also help restore degraded forest ecosystems and thus, be an effective climate adaptation strategy.

 

Step 5: Extend the understanding of the benefits of Bamboo as a natural resource

Report  Bamboo can help to “combat climate change" and Associated Audio File

  1. Use this brief news report ‘Bamboo can help to “combat climate change" and the associated audio file (interview of the Director General of the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR), Hans Friedrich), by UN News to explain the benefits of growing Bamboo as a fast-growing renewable natural resource to offset the adverse effects of climate change.
  2. Use this tool to explain how Bamboo is highly effective in reforestation and preventing soil erosion.
  3. Further, discuss the different ways in which Bamboo can be used in sustainable living and for providing economically viable livelihoods.
  4. Finally, discuss how restoration of disturbed natural ecosystems and the provision of new resources and livelihoods by Bamboo planting can reduce the burden on other forest resources, prevent further habitat degradation and thereby, aid Mountain Gorilla conservation.
  5. Read about the potential benefits of Bamboo by exploring item 3 and about an extensive Bamboo planting programme in Africa- Bamboo For Good (B4G)- by exploring item 4, in the additional resources section of this lesson plan.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As an undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about differences in photosynthesis in different types of plants (C3, C4 and CAM) and how they are affected by climate change: which is more resilient or less resilient. You can discuss all these basic concepts in plant physiology using the case study: Uganda’s massive expansion of Bamboo, a C3 plant, to address the issue of heavy deforestation, under changing climatic conditions.

This lesson plan includes resources that teach about the C3, C4 photosynthetic pathways in plants and describes the differences in their physiological responses to changing environmental conditions like rising atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and temperatures. You can also use these resources to teach photorespiration, nutrient and water uptake, stomatal conductance, carbon -fixation and, more importantly, homoeostasis for photosynthetic efficiency under these varying conditions. Use this lesson plan to explain how this understanding can be applied to devise climate adaptation strategies by using the example of large-scale Bamboo plantation in Uganda.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences (specifically Plant Physiology).

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are C3, C4, and CAM plants? Describe the differences in their photosynthetic pathways?
  2. Describe what factors have the most impact on the photosynthetic efficiencies of C3, C4 and CAM plants.
  3. How global warming and higher CO2 concentrations may affect the growth and development of C3, C4 and CAM plants?
  4. Explain physiological limitations in C3, C4 and CAM plants to adapt to climate change.
  5. How is a C3 plant Bamboo, suited to restore the fractured forest ecosystems of Uganda?

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline
  • Plant Physiology, Photosynthetic Pathways, C3, C4, and CAM Plants
  • Photorespiration, Stomatal Conductance, Photosynthetic Efficiency
  • Temperature Adaptation, Temperature Acclimation, Homoeostasis
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere

Climate Mitigation and Adaptation

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
80 min

Contents

Video micro-lecture

(~12 min)

A micro-lecture that introduces the topic of photosynthesis and describe the differences in C3, C4 and CAM photosynthetic pathways in plants.

Video: Photosynthesis

Video micro-lecture

(7.5 min)

A video micro-lecture that introduces the C3, C4 photosynthetic pathways and explains how plants have evolved to respond differently to changing climatic conditions.

Video : Plant Response to Climate Change

Readings

(~40 min)

Two readings that describe the photosynthetic responses of plants to factors of climate change:

  1. A reading to discuss the difference in the responses of C3 and C4 plants to rising levels of atmospheric CO2.
  2. A reading to describe the differences in temperature adaptation and acclimation for the C3, C4 photosynthetic pathways.
Readings (10 min) Two readings to discuss the extensive planting of a C3 plant Bamboo, in Uganda:

1) A case study of Bamboo For Good (B4G) initiative that has program partnerships in Uganda and other East African Countries for growing Bamboo to address ‘critical social, economic, environmental, and wildlife habitat needs’.

Case study:  Bamboo For Good (B4G)

2) A tabular representation of the attributes of planting Bamboo as a climate adaptation strategy against human-induced large-scale deforestation.

Reading: “The poor man’s carbon sink: Bamboo in climate change and poverty alleviation” (page 28, Table 3)

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Video)

  1. Introduce the topic by playing the video micro-lecture, “Photosynthesis” from bozemanscience. This video explains the process of photosynthesis, chloroplasts and photoreceptors, the light reaction and the Calvin cycle, and gives an overview of photosynthetic pathways in C3, C4, and CAM plants.
  2. Use the video to explain how these pathways are affected by stomatal conductance, which in turn affects nutrient and water uptake by the plants.
  3. Further, explain the influence of photorespiration on photosynthetic efficiencies and thereby, carbon fixation in C3, C4 plants- use the resource, ‘C3, C4, and CAM plants. How the C4 and CAM pathways help minimize photorespiration.’ by Khan Academy, from the additional resources section, to explain this in detail.

 

Step 2: Extend discussion to explain how the C4/CAM plants have evolved in response to climate change (Go to the Video)

  1. Play the video micro-lecture, ‘Plant Response to Climate Change’ by Prof. Raghu Murtugudde (content developed at Science Media Centre, IISER Pune), to explain that C3 and C4 type plants evolved differently as a response to changes in temperature and CO2
  2. This micro-lecture explains the possible influence of CO2 levels and climate change on the growth of plants and consequently on vegetation and crop productivity.

 

Step 3: Further the understanding of the effect of climate change on the photosynthetic efficiencies of plants

Reading "Effects of Rising Atmospheric Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide on Plants"

Reading "Temperature response of photosynthesis in C3, C4, and CAM plants: temperature acclimation and temperature adaptation"

  1. Provide your students with printouts of the following readings to discuss the influence of climate change related factors- increased atmospheric CO2 and rising global temperatures-on the photosynthetic efficiencies of C3 and C4 plants.
  2. Use the reading “Effects of Rising Atmospheric Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide on Plants” from Nature Education to discuss the effects of elevated CO2 levels on the photosynthetic efficiency of field-grown plants.
    • Use the text to explain that plant physiology and biochemical compositions change in response to high CO2
    • Secondary effects like changes in stomatal conductance affect efficiency of carbon fixation and water uptake in plants.
    • Thus, differences in the responses of C3 and C4 plants under these conditions are noted.
    • Discuss the results showing a higher rate of photosynthesis for C3 plants with increased CO2 atmospheric concentrations compared to C4 plants.
  3. Use the reading, ‘Temperature response of photosynthesis in C3, C4, and CAM plants: temperature acclimation and temperature adaptation’, from Springer Science+Business Media, to explain how the type of photosynthetic pathway determines the ability of a plant to respond to climate related temperature changes.
  4. Use this reading to discuss plant phenotypic plasticity, temperature acclimation and temperature adaptation in terms of photosynthetic efficiencies of C3 and C4 plants.
  5. Discuss this in conjunction with the perceived improved photosynthetic efficiency of C3 plants at higher temperatures compared to C4 plants.

 

Step 4: Discuss the case study of Bamboo Plantation in Uganda

Two readings to discuss the extensive planting of a C3 plant Bamboo, in Uganda:

 Case study of  Bamboo For Good (B4G)

 Reading: “The poor man's carbon sink: Bamboo in climate change and poverty alleviation” (page 28, Table 3)

  1. Use the resource, ‘B4G- Bamboo For Good’ by Pacific Bamboo Resources, to discuss the case study of a collaborative effort of a number of public and private institutions to ‘mobilize bamboo resources for good’ in East Africa and specifically in Uganda.
  2. Navigate to various tabs on the website to learn more about the partnership programs in Uganda that work towards ‘social empowerment, economic vitality, and environmental health’ through its different projects.
  3. Use this table- Table 3. Bamboo attributes for climate change, page 28- from ‘The poor man’s carbon sink: Bamboo in Climate Change and Poverty Alleviation’ by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), to discuss the attributes of Bamboo as the plant chosen to provide a fast growing and sustainable green cover to restore the human-induced fragmented forest ecosystems of Uganda.
  4. In the context of this lesson plan, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using Bamboo as a climate adaptation strategy against deforestation in Uganda.
  5. Elaborate on the possibility of improved photosynthetic efficiency of this species under increased temperature and atmospheric CO2 conditions.
  6. Discuss how this contrasts with its sensitivity towards water stress and drought like conditions, the other aspects of climate related factors that impact photosynthetic efficiencies of C3 plants.

Use the resources (one video and one reading) in the additional resources section of this lesson plan to discuss the benefits of using Bamboo to restore vegetation in large areas of Uganda that are denuded of natural forest cover due to deforestation by anthropogenic activities.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

Classroom/Laboratory Activity: What are Aerosols?
Reading: Water Vapour Feedback and Earth’s Climate Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Volcanoes and Climate
Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Thermal Potential of Carbon dioxide Video lecture: Plant Responses to Climate Related Abiotic Stress
Teaching Module: Plant Response to Climate related Temperature and Water Stress Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Photosynthesis Under Variable Environmental Conditions
Reading: Photosynthesis and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Video micro-lecture: Phase Diagrams and Earth’s Climate
Video: Permafrost and Climate Change Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Permafrost and Climate Change
Visualization: pH Levels of Oceans and Atmospheric CO2 Reading: Climate-Informed Development to Mitigate Global Poverty

As a high school English teacher, you can use this lesson plan to help you in teaching reading and analysis skills as part of English Language Teaching (ELT). The lesson plan involves training students in skills such as skimming and close reading, and comprehension based on the reading.

The article used for this study is Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen’s, ‘Geology of Mankind’, that describes the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Functional English or English Language Teaching (ELT).

This is a teacher-submitted lesson plan, contributed by Dr. Pooja Sancheti, Visiting Faculty, IISER Pune, India

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Paul J. Crutzen

A Nobel Prize-winning,  atmospheric chemist

Questions

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. learn to skim and close read a non-fiction text
  2. learn to answer questions that range in difficulty; to test basic comprehension, vocabulary in context, and inference
  3. understand the meaning and significance of the term ‘Anthropocene’

Anthropocene is a new term, proposed in 2000 by Paul Crutzen. The Anthropocene defines Earth’s most recent geologic time period (Anthropocene) as being human-influenced, or anthropogenic, based on overwhelming global evidence that atmospheric, geologic, hydrologic, biospheric and other earth system processes are now altered by humans.

Find out more

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Humanities, English Literature
Topic(s) in Discipline Reading Comprehension, Scanning

Skimming, Close Reading, SQ3R Method

Vocabulary, Inference, Summarizing

Non-fiction, Anthropocene

Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere

Climate and the Biosphere

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
50-60 min

Contents

Reading

(~10 min)

A text to introduce and explain the reading techniques of skimming and close reading.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(30 – 40 min)

A text to examine using the reading techniques of skimming and close reading. The text used is Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen’s article, ‘Geology of Mankind’, that describes the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’.

Go to the Reading

Classroom Activity

(~10 min)

A multiple-choice questionnaire to test the students’ understanding of the above text followed by an analysis of answers through peer review.

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Introduction to reading techniques

1. Use the text, ’Reading Strategies: Skimming vs Close Reading’, by GradProSkills, Concordia University, Montreal, to introduce to your students the techniques of skimming and close-reading.
2. Explain to your students the difference between ‘scanning’ and ‘skimming’.
3. Discuss the points to consider for skimming articles of diverse types such as scientific and engineering journal papers, and essays in humanities.
4. Explain how and when the technique of close-reading is employed.
5. Discuss the SQ3R (survey, question, read, recite, review) method of close reading for improving reading comprehension.

 

Step 2: Apply the understanding of reading techniques to study the chosen text

Use the text, ‘Geology of Mankind’ by Paul Crutzen, to employ the two main reading strategies discussed before.

A) Skimming the article (6-8 min):

  1. First, remind the students of the technique of skimming where the reader rapidly runs their eye throughout the passage without looking for any specific information.
  2. Explain that the aim of skimming is to gather the basic idea of what the text might be dealing with, and some key words that may pop out.
  3. Then, hand out copies of ‘Geology of Mankind’, to the class. Ask them not to look at it until the entire class has a copy each. Instruct your students to now skim the article. Use a stop watch and give the students 90-120 seconds to skim Crutzen’s article. Keeping the time limited is important so that students are only able to skim and not close read.
  4. Once the time is up, ask the students to mention (without looking at the text) whatever they may have gathered from this initial reading.
  5. Ask them for key words that they may have noticed. Write these words on the blackboard/whiteboard. They will likely include “Anthropocene”, “telluric”, “greenhouse gases”, “epoch”, “anthropogenic”, “chlorofluorocarbons”, “millennia”, “ozone”, and “catastrophe”. Explain the meanings of these words to them.

At this point, the idea is not to indicate to them if they have understood the article and its argument correctly; it is simply to collate the bare minimum information they have gathered and impressions regarding the text’s content and the tone that they may have gathered. The cumulative of the students’ answers attained through skimming and the vocabulary discussed will form a backbone for the following step of close reading.

B) Close reading and discussion (15-20 min):

  1. Now, ask the students to return to the article and begin to carefully read each line.
  2. Instruct them to note their ideas about the main argument of the article and the proof in text for the same.
  3. Ask them to underline/highlight the main points in the text.
  4. Give them about 10 minutes to read.
  5. Once the reading is done, direct a discussion around the following broad points (10 min):
    • a) What is the writer’s main argument?
    • b) What examples of the argument are found in the text?
    • c) What is the chronology of the Anthropocene according to the author?

 

Step 3: Classroom Activity

  1. Use copies of the following questionnaire to test the students’ understanding of the text. The questions are aimed at the details in the article and to test their close reading skills. They may refer to the text to locate the relevant parts to find the answers. Give about 5 minutes for this exercise.
  2. The Student Questionnaire can be found here.
  3. Ask them to read their answers aloud in class and through peer review, correct those that they got wrong.
  4. The key to the student questionnaire, for your reference: 1 c, 2 a, 3 d, 4 b, 5 d, 6 b, 7 c, 8 d, 9 a, 10 a

As a Humanities or Social Sciences high school or undergraduate teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about the Constitution of a country, the components of a nation’s Constitution, and the recognition that climate change is a fundamental constitutional issue for certain nations. This lesson plan uses the Constitution of Bhutan as an example.

Bhutan transitioned from a monarchy led state to a democratic nation recently and adopted its constitution in 2008. By perusing the Constitution of Bhutan, you can teach your students about various parts of a nation’s Constitution including the preamble, the fundamental rights and duties of a citizen, and principles of state policy amongst others. This lesson plan includes a tool to study the constitutions of different nations and to compare their national policies on various issues like climate, climate change and the environment. In the Constitution of Bhutan, the promotion of Gross National Happiness (GNH) is a principle of state policy and this lesson plan will enable your students to understand how Bhutan’s GNH is threatened by climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in History/Civics in the Humanities or Social Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. How is the Constitution structured?
  2. What are the purposes of a government and how is it organized?
  3. Who is a citizen of a Nation? What are the fundamental rights and duties of a citizen?
  4. What are the major similarities and differences between Bhutan’s Constitution and your nation’s Constitution?
  5. How is Bhutan’s GNH impacted by climate change?

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Jigme Tenzin and Tshering Choden (Khasadrapchu Middle Secondary School), Tej Prasad Kafley and Chador Wangmo (Rinchen Kuenphen Primary School), Tshewang Dema (Motithang Higher Secondary School), and Dorji Yangzom (Dechencholing Higher Secondary School), Thimphu, Bhutan.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Monarchy, Democracy, Constitution

Articles of the Constitution, the Preamble to the Constitution

Parliament, Government, Citizenship

Fundamental Duties, Fundamental Rights

Principles of State Policy, Rules of Governance

Gross National Happiness, Poverty, Environmental Policy

Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Location Global
Language(s) English, Some tools are also in Arabic, Spanish
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-70 min

Contents

Video micro-lecture

(~6.5 min)

A video micro-lecture that describes what a nation’s Constitution is and why it is fundamentally important for it.

Go to the Video

Reading

(20 min)

The Constitution of The Kingdom of Bhutan as an example of a Constitution of a democratic nation with emphasis on the State Policy of promoting Gross National Happiness (GNH).

Go to the Reading

Video and Associated Reading

 (~20 min)

A documentary (~12 min) and an associated media write-up on a United Nations Development Project (UNDP) report that lists the impacts of climate change on Bhutan’s state policy of pursuing GNH.

Go to the Video

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

(20 min)

An exploration of a website to study and compare the Constitutions of almost 200 countries. The tool is also available in Arabic or Spanish for around 50 constitutions.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Video)

  1. Use this video micro-lecture, ‘What is a Constitution?’ by the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA), to introduce the concept of a Constitution and explain why it is fundamentally for every nation to have it.
  2. Explain how the Constitution defines the aims and ideals of the nation that it represents.
  3. Use the tool to introduce the different parts of the constitution such as the Preamble, the Articles of the Constitution, the State Policies, the pillars of democracy- Parliament, Government and Judiciary, citizenship, fundamental rights and duties of every citizen and the rules of governance.

Step 2: Develop the topic further using an example (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the document, “The Constitution of The Kingdom of Bhutan” by the National Council of Bhutan, as an example to describe the different parts of a country’s constitution.
  2. Go through every section to give a brief overview of Bhutan’s Constitution.
  3. Use the reading to discuss with your students, what they perceive are the aims and ideals of the Bhutanese people.
  4. Draw attention to Article 5 that pertains to the Environment and discuss the fundamental duty of every citizen and the Royal Government to protect the natural environment of Bhutan, conserve its rich biodiversity, and prevent its ecological degradation: and thereby, ‘ensure a safe and healthy environment’.
  5. Use this point to bring focus to the Preamble that pledges to ‘enhance the unity, happiness and well-being of the people for all time’. Discuss how this pledge ties into the Principles of State Policy outlined in Article 9, no. 2- ‘The State shall strive to promote…Gross National Happiness’.

Step 3: Discuss further (Go to the Video)

  1. Use the news report, ‘Climate change threatens Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness’ by Surekha Subarwal and Sonam Tsoki Tenzin of the UNDP to discuss the findings of a 2011 report published by the Gross National Happiness Commission Secretariat and UNDP, on the impact of climate change on Bhutan’s GNH.
  2. First, play the documentary, ‘PEI Bhutan, in pursuit of Sustainable Development’ by the UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative, to initiate your students to how climate change adversely affects a cross-section of the people of Bhutan. Discuss how this goes against the ethos of the Constitution in achieving Gross National Happiness in Bhutan.
  3. Then, use the text to discuss the greater impact of climate change on ‘the livelihoods of a quarter of Bhutan’s population that live in poverty and depend on subsistence farming and local natural resources which are vulnerable to changing weather patterns and melting glaciers’. Optional: Further information about the global link between poverty and climate change can be obtained in the additional resources section.
  4. Use the report to explain the threats to Bhutan’s natural resources and the measures adopted to adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change. Explain how Bhutan has strived to become a carbon-neutral state; and by increasing forest cover to 70-80 percent of land, is now a carbon sink for the world.
  5. Finally, discuss the sustainability strategies employed by the Gross National Happiness Commission of Bhutan to improve resilience against climate change.

Step 4: Classroom/Laboratory Activity (Go to the Activity)

  1. Explore the website, ‘CONSTITUTE’, by Comparative Constitutions Project, University of Texas, Austin, to study almost 200 different national constitutions. The tool is also available in Arabic or Spanish for around 50 constitutions.
  2. Use the tool to discuss the constitution of a nation or to compare policies between constitutions- for example, the environment or climate policies.
  3. Use the navigation tools to ‘quickly find relevant passages’ for a particular topic, ‘filter searches’ for specific regions or time periods, ‘read excerpts in List or Compare view’ and ‘pin for further analysis’.
  4. The documents are available to be downloaded, exported to Google Docs or rendered in PDF.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goals, apart from 4 and 13

As an undergraduate Social Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about Capitalism, Capitalist Modes of Production, History of Capitalism, Consumerism, Materials Economy and its effect on climate change.

Students will learn about the history of capitalism- the factors that led to the creation of a capitalist society and be able to describe the various aspects of a capitalist economy. They will learn how capitalist modes of production have driven consumerism in societies and contributed to a large extent to climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Social Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is capitalism?
  2. Describe the global rise of a capitalist society.
  3. What are capitalist modes of production?
  4. What is a materials economy and how does it impact consumption patterns?
  5. How is consumerism increasingly being linked to cultural and social identities?
  6. How has capitalism affected climate change?

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Nupurnima Yadav, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalist Modes of Production,
Rise of Capitalism, Consumerism
Materials Economy, Commodification
Production of Capital
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
80-90 min

Contents

Reading

(~40 min)

A reading that describes the history of capitalism and the capitalist modes of production.

Go to the Reading

(only ‘Introduction’ and the 1st chapter, till pg. 43)

Video micro-lecture

(22 min)

A micro-lecture that describes the linear production and consumption pattern of a capitalist society (United States) that has led to the exploitation of Earth’s finite natural resources.

Go to the Video

Reading

(~25 min)

A reading that describes the link between a capitalist/consumer economy and climate change.

Go to the Reading

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion

  1. Use the reading, ‘Historical Capitalism with Capitalist Civilization’ (only ‘Introduction’ and the 1st chapter, till pg. 43), by Immanuel Wallerstein to introduce the topic of capitalism, explain the ideology of capitalism, and describe its historical development in societies.
  2. Explain how capitalism has always existed as a historical social process.
  3. Describe how commodification of processes led to the rise in capitalism.
  4. Use the reading to describe different modes of capitalist production such as unequal exchange of goods and vertical integration of processes.
  5. Discuss the factors involved, such as availability of labor, that influence the capitalist mode of production.
  6. Emphasize on the role of the proletariat in the building of the capital.
  7. Finally, describe how a feudal yet egalitarian European society in the 15th century was transformed by the 17th century, with the establishment of a capitalist society.
  8. Discuss the emerging of capitalism in the first industrialized nation- Britain- alongside the agrarian and industrial revolutions.
  9. Explain how social and economic developments led to the rise of capitalism in Britain- transformation from a feudal to a wage-labor society.

Go to the Reading  (only ‘Introduction’ and the 1st chapter, till pg. 43)

Step 2: Extend the understanding

  1. Play the video, ‘The Story of Stuff’, by Annie Leonard to describe how capitalism leads to a consumerist society.
  2. Explain how commodification of the capital leads to a materials economy.
  3. Use the video to describe consumerism and to show how it is linked to social and cultural identities of nations.
  4. Explain how the linear production and consumption pattern of the United States that has led to several environmental and social issues.
  5. Describe how the production and consumption of goods release large amounts of greenhouse gases and contribute significantly to climate change.

Go to the Video

Step 3: Discuss how capitalism affects climate change

  1. Use the reading, ‘Climate Change and Capitalism’, by Jonathan T. Park, University of Utah, to discuss the link between capitalism and climate change.
  2. Explain how the consumer ideology in a capitalist society results in the overproduction and overconsumption of goods.
  3. Discuss the implications of this: exploitation of natural resources, high energy expenditure, excess waste production and extensive environmental degradation due to pollution.
  4. Emphasize that capitalist modes of production require large scale burning of fossil fuels to meet energy requirements, and these in turn contribute towards global warming.
  5. Thus, discuss with your students how the capitalist model can be modified for a sustainable future: preservation of natural resources and mitigating climate change.

Go to the Reading

Mapped Sustainable Development Goals, apart from 4 and 13

As an undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about plant diseases, plant pathogens, disease pathology in plants and the impact of climate on the incidence and severity of plant disease.

This lesson plan enables students to learn about plant pathogens and disease. Climate changes such as increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global warming not only affect the growth and cultivation of crops but also the reproduction, spread and severity of plant diseases. This lesson plan teaches about the influence of climate on plant diseases.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Potato leaf infected with a fungal blight
Image: Encyclopædia Britannica

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is plant disease? How does it differ from plant disorders?
  2. What are the primary causal agents of disease in plants?
  3. What are plant pathogens?
  4. What are the signs and symptoms of plant disease?
  5. How do changing climatic conditions impact the development and spread of disease in plants?

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Aditi Kothari-Chhajer, Dr. Amit Vashishtha and Dr. Neeti Mehla, Sri Venkateswara College, (Delhi University), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Common scab of potato
Image: Nigel Cattlin—Holt Studios International/Photo Researchers, Inc.

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Plant Pathology, Plant Pathogens, Plant Disease
Plant Disease Causal Agents, Plant Host,
Plant Parasitic Vector, Pathogenesis
Host-Pathogen-Environment Triangle
Crop Security, Food Security
Climate Topic Climate and the Biospheret
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
90-120 min

Contents

Video micro-lecture

(~20 min)

An introductory video micro-lecture that gives an insight into plant diseases caused by various causal agents: bacteria, nematodes, viruses and fungi. It also briefly describes disease management strategies in field crops.

Go to the Video

(up to 19.30 min)

Reading

(~40 min)

A reading that describes the effect of climate change on plant diseases. Climate influences the incidence as well as the temporal and spatial distribution of plant diseases.

Go to the Reading

Laboratory/

Field Activity

(~30-60 min)

A field activity that teaches about the signs and symptoms of disease in plants.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Introduce the topic by playing a micro-lecture (video)

  1. Play the video micro-lecture, ‘Introduction to Plant Diseases of Field Crops ‘, by Dr. Damon Smith from University of Wisconsin, Integrated Crop and Pest Management, to introduce the topic of plant disease.
  2. Use the video to describe various causal agents (pathogens) that are responsible for the development of disease in plants.
  3. Describe the course of pathogenesis in plants due to pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, nematodes and fungi.
  4. Use the video to recognize how plant disease differs from plant disorders.
  5. Emphasize on the significance of the host-pathogen-environment triangle for the healthy growth of plants.
  6. Finally, discuss how targeted disease management strategies are employed for crop security.

Go to the Video (up to 19.30 min)

Step 2: Explain the effect of climate change on plant disease

  1. Use the reading, ‘The Effect of Climate Change on Plant Diseases’, by Yáñez-López et al (2012), African Journal of Biotechnology, 11(10), 2417-2428, to explain how climate change impacts pathogenesis in plants.
  2. Explain that climate can affect the developmental stages of pathogens, the dispersal of pathogens, and the geographical distribution of hosts and pathogens.
  3. Thus, discuss how climate change related factors such as global warming and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can affect plant-pathogen interactions.
  4. Describe how the changing plant disease distribution and occurrence rates results in greater crop losses and affect food security.
  5. Finally discuss how sustainable food production with disease management strategies could be directed for a changing climate.

Go to the Reading

Step 3: Extend the understanding

  1. Use this activity, ‘Disease Plant Walk’, by the American Pathological Society, to teach your students about the signs and symptoms of disease in plants.
  2. Distinguish between healthy and diseased plants. Extend the students’ understanding of host-pathogen interactions by identifying different diseases in the observed plants and discussing their causal agents.
  3. Direct your students to record their observations and to do a follow-up set of observations (after a few days or weeks), in order to note how the disease progressed in these plants.
  4. Encourage your students to analyze the recorded observations using parameters such as the host-pathogen-environment triangle and the temporal and spatial distribution of disease.
  5. Emphasize on the role of environmental factors on the severity of disease and disease progression.
  6. Extend the discussion to include climate change related factors such as global warming and increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and their possible impacts on plant disease, which in turn can affect crop/food security.

Go to the Activity

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As an undergraduate Chemistry teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach the Beer-Lambert Law and its application in atmospheric radiation absorption studies.

This lesson plan will enable students to learn about the Beer-Lambert Law and understand its application for studying the molar absorptivity of greenhouse gases.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the Beer-Lambert Law? How is it expressed in an equation?
  2. Define the molar absorptivity of a chemical medium.
  3. How is the intensity of transmitted light affected by the molar absorptivity of the medium?
  4. How does the path length affect the absorbance of transmitted light?
  5. How would increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases affect the absorbance of sunlight?

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Pragya Gahlot and Dr. Rekha Yadav, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Diagram illustrating absorption of light according to the Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law.

Find out more: American Physical Society

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry
Topic(s) in Discipline Beer-Lambert Law, Molar Absorptivity

Absorbance of Incident Light

Transmittance of Incident Light

Intensity of Transmitted Light

Greenhouse Gases, Molar Absorption Coefficient

Molar Extinction Coefficient

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere

The Greenhouse Gas Effect

Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online
Approximate
Time Required
55-60 min

Contents

Reading

(~30 min)

A reading that introduces the Beer-Lambert Law and derives the expression for the law. It also includes several examples to show the application of the Beer-Lambert Law for absorbance of transmitted light in medium, under different conditions.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~10 min)

A reading that uses the Beer-Lambert Law to explain the increasing global warming potential of Earth’s atmosphere due to the higher concentrations of greenhouse gases, in recent times.

Go to the Reading

Visualization

(~15 min)

A simulation to explore the effects of the change in concentration of medium and path length on the absorbance of transmitted light.

Go to the Visualization

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use chapter reading, ‘The Beer-Lambert Law’ by LibreTextsTM, to introduce the topic of light transmittance through a medium and Beer-Lambert’s Law.
  2. Explain how light transmitted through a medium is affected by its concentration.
  3. Also, discuss the importance of the path length for light transmittance through a medium.
  4. Use the reading to derive an expression for the Beer-Lambert’s Law.
  5. Emphasize on the non-linear (exponential) relation between transmittance and concentration of medium.
  6. Thus, define its molar absorptivity or molar absorption coefficient or molar extinction coefficient (ε).
  7. Use the examples given in the text, to teach students to use the Beer-Lambert’s Law to calculate values for the concentration, pathlength, and molar absorptivity of a given medium.

Step 2: Extend the understanding (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Chemical Connections to Climate Change’ by Tom Kuntzleman, Chemical Education Xchange (ChemEd X), to teach students how the Beer-Lambert Law can be used to study the transmittance of sunlight through the atmosphere.
  2. Discuss the composition of the atmosphere and list out the gases that make up the atmosphere.
  3. Extend the understanding of the Beer-Lambert Law to evaluate the absorbance values of individual gases in the atmosphere.
  4. Use the text to initiate a discussion about the absorption potential of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane.
  5. Discuss how this results in warming on Earth due to the greenhouse effect.
  6. Finally, use the reading to explain how this greenhouse gas effect is exacerbated by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Step 3: Explore the topic further (Go to the Visualization)

  1. Use the simulation, ‘Beer’s Law Lab’ by PhET Interactive Simulations, University of Colorado, to allow students to explore the Beer-Lambert’s Law for absorbance/transmittance of incident light through a solution.
  2. Encourage the students to note the absorbance/transmittance values of incident light when the simulation is run.
  3. Direct the students to run the simulation for different solution concentrations, pathlengths and wavelengths of incident light.
  4. Use the data generated to observe the correlations between these varying parameters (concentration of solution, pathlength and wavelength of incident light) and absorbance/transmittance values.
  5. Initiate an enquiry-based discussion for further understanding of these correlations eg how much does the absorbance value change when the concentration of a solution is doubled.

Pierre Bouguer

August Beer

J H Lambert

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use these set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about insects, insect biodiversity and the impact of climate change on insects and insect behavior.

The lesson plan allows students to study about insects and the role they play in the ecosystem. The students will be able to link the impact climate change has on the existence as well as behavior of insects. The hands-on activity will enable the students to understand the impact of changing temperature on insect behavior.

Thus, this lesson plan helps to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in the Biological Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are insects? What roles do they play in the ecosystem?
  2. What are the possible impacts of climate change on insects?
  3. What are the possible impacts of climate change on insect behavior?

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Namita Nayyar, Assistant Professor, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Chafer beetles (Hoplia caerulea)

Find out more: http://iberianature.com/lucyblog/tag/hoplia-caerulea/

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Insects, Arthropods, Ecology,

Animal Behavior, Insect Behavior

Insect Biodiversity, Food Web, Food Security

Invasive Species, Vector-borne Diseases

Impact of temperature variation on Insects

Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
110-120 min

Contents

Reading

(~30 min)

A reading that introduces the biology and ecology of insects.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~15 min)

A report that links the impact of climate change on insect populations.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(~10 min)

A reading that describes altered insect behavior in response to temperature fluctuations.

Go to the Reading

(Read only Page 42-43: Main concepts and Skills)

Classroom /Laboratory Activity

(~45-60 min)

A hands-on classroom/laboratory activity to study insect responses (behavior) to temperature variations.

Go to the Activity

(Page 48)

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use this reading, ‘Insect Biology and Ecology: A Primer’, by Anthony Shelton, Professor of Entomology, Cornell University, to introduce the topic of insects.
  2. First, discuss its classification within Class Insecta, Phylum Arthropoda.
  3. Next, use the reading to explain basic insect anatomy and insect growth and development.
  4. Deliberate upon the different types of insects (bugs, mosquitoes, houseflies, grasshoppers, spiders, etc.) to highlight the existence of a vast variety of insects in the biosphere.
  5. Discuss the roles that insects play in the ecosystem (pollinators, commercial importance, natural enemy of pests, scavengers, etc.). Thus, explain the importance of maintaining a balance in the insect populations for the wellbeing of an ecosystem.
  6. Finally, stress on the delicately balanced interactions and the inter-dependence of insects and the environment that are ubiquitous in the natural world.

 

Step 2 : Explain the link between climate change and insects (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the report, ‘Climate-Change Impact on Insects 'Simply Cannot be Ignored’’, by the Entomological Society of America, to discuss the findings of several studies on the impacts of climate change on insect survival.
  2. Begin by discussing a study that has reported a dramatic loss of insect populations in Puerto Rico’s Luquillo rainforest over a span of approximately 35 years. Highlight the associated decline in the population of lizards, frogs, etc. that consume arthropods and therefore, the intrinsic balance within food webs.
  3. Compare this study with other studies mentioned in the report.
  4. Explain the adverse impacts of climate related rapid decline in the global insect populations on insect biodiversity, food security, vector-borne diseases, invasive species, etc.
  5. Finally, facilitate a discussion among the students about the urgency of finding solutions to this problem as climate change can affect global biodiversity.

Step 3 : Discuss the possible effect of global warming on insect behavior (Go to the Reading)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Interesting Insects’ (Chapter 1, Lesson 3, Pages 42-43: Main Concepts and Skills) from ‘Integrating Climate Change Issues in Southeast Asian Schools; A Teachers’ Guide’ by Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO), to understand the implications of climate change related increase in the average temperature of the Earth on insect behavior.
  2. Explain to your students how environmental temperature variations can show an immediate effect on insect behavior due to their cold-blooded physiology.
  3. Also discuss the long-term effects of varying temperatures on insect populations such as changes in insect phenology and life cycles.
  4. Note: Read only Page 42-43: Main concepts and Skills from the suggested reading.

Step 4 : Classroom/Laboratory Activity (Go to the Activity, Page 48)

  1. Use this laboratory activity, ‘Interesting Insects’ (Chapter 1, Lesson 3, Page 48: A COLD BLOODED BUG’s LIFE) from ‘Integrating Climate Change Issues in Southest Asian Schools; A Teachers’ Guide’ by SEAMEO, to investigate the immediate responses of insects to varying external temperatures.
  2. Using the worksheet provided, direct your students to firstly collect all relevant material and follow the instructions for the experiments.
  3. Ask your students to record all their observations of insect responses to temperature changes. F
  4. Finally, use the ‘Guide Questions’ to analyze the observations on changes in insect behavior due to temperature variations.

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a High School or Undergraduate Chemistry or Environmental Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about allotropy, various allotropes of carbon and their structural and physical properties, black carbon, sources of black carbon and its impact on Earth’s climate.

This lesson plan will help students understand the concept of allotropy and various allotropes of carbons. Students will learn about black carbon, the effect of black carbon on the Earth’s albedo and therefore, its impact on the climate. This lesson plan will also help students to understand how the immediate effect of controlling black carbon emission can potentially slow down the rate of global warming.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Chemistry or Environmental Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are allotropes? What are the various allotropes of carbon and their properties?
  2. What are the sources of black carbon?
  3. What are the different effects of black carbon on clouds? How does it modify rainfall pattern?
  4. How does the deposition of black carbon on ice caps affect melting of the ice?
  5. Explain how black carbon can have a cooling or warming effect on the planet?
  6. What is the effect of black carbon on human health?

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Shefali Shukla, Sri Venkateswara College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Light-absorbing soot (arrows) form chain-like aggregates and can glom on to light-reflecting sulfates (large rounded particles).

Find out more: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/3844

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Chemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Allotropy, Allotropes of carbon, Black Carbon

Sources of Black Carbon

Heating and Cooling Effects of Black Carbon,

Effect of Black Carbon on Human Health

Black Carbon Albedo, Black Carbon Emission

Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere, The Greenhouse Gas Effect, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
90-120 min

Contents

Reading

(~15 min)

A reading that defines what is allotropy and describes some allotropes of carbon with their properties and uses.

Go to the Reading

Video

(~ 6 min)

A video that introduces black carbon, an allotrope of carbon and describes its impact on health and climate.

Go to the Video

Reading

(~10 min)

A reading that describes the albedo effect of black carbon and how it affects the nature and formation of clouds, resulting in both, a warming and cooling effect on the Earth’s surface.

Go to the Reading

Classroom /Laboratory Activity

(~60-90 min)

For high school students:

A laboratory activity to demonstrate the effect of black carbon on surface temperatures.

Go to the Activity for high school

 

For undergraduates:

A classroom activity to discuss the implications of black carbon emissions on health and climate.

Go to the Activity for undergraduates

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

  • Use this textbook reading, ‘Allotropes of Carbon’, provided by Lumen Learning, to introduce allotropy and discuss the various allotropes of carbon.
  • Use this tool to explain the structural details of carbon allotropes, their physical and chemical properties and their applications, especially in materials science.

 

Step 2 : Discuss an allotrope of carbon- Black Carbon (Go to the Video)

  • Use the video, ‘Black Carbon’ by NBC News Learn, to introduce the topic of black carbon, an allotrope of carbon and describe its sources.
  • Use the video to describe its impact on health and climate. Explain using the video, how black carbon contributes to global warming by altering the albedo of clouds and land and ice surfaces.
  • Discuss how cutting down black carbon emissions can have an immediate impact on the greenhouse effect caused by it.

 

Step 3 : Develop the topic further  (Go to the Reading)

  • Use the feature article, ‘Black Carbon and Warming: It’s Worse than We Thought’, by Carl Zimmer in YaleEnvironment360, published by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, to discuss a report that suggests that black carbon is second only to carbon dioxide in its heat trapping power.
  • Use the reading to explain to your students, the various ways in which clouds are affected by soot or black carbon.
  • Discuss how the albedo effect of black carbon, especially in clouds, affects Earth’s atmosphere as well as its surface temperatures.
  • Emphasize how black carbon deposition is speeding up the melting of Himalayan Glaciers.
  • Finally, explain why a reduction in black carbon emissions could cause an immediate slowdown of the planet’s warming.

 

Step 4 : Classroom/Laboratory Activity

For high school students: (Go to the Activity for high school)

  • Use this inquiry-based hands on laboratory activity, ‘Changing Planet: Black Carbon- A Dusty Situation’, adapted by Missy Holzer, Jennifer Bergman, and Roberta Johnson of the NESTA/Windows to the Universe team, to help the students to understand the albedo effect of black carbon.
  • Follow the instructions to obtain data for the surface heat absorption capacity of varying concentrations of black carbon on paper.
  • Materials for set-up including students’ worksheets are listed in the right-hand column of the summary table.
  • Use the graphed data to discuss with your students the influence of black carbon on the heat absorption ability of the Earth’s surface.
  • Discuss how cutting down of black carbon emissions can reduce global surface temperatures.

 

For undergraduates: (Go to the Activity for undergraduates)

  • Use this group activity, ‘Energy and the Poor- Black Carbon in the Developing Nations’, by Science Education Research Center at Carleton College (SERC Carleton), to discuss how the burning of fossil fuels and biomass-based fuels results in black carbon emissions in developing countries.
  • Use this activity to enable students to ‘critically evaluate the impacts of varied household energy sources, synthesize a wide range of social, health and environmental impacts and generate solutions to these problems’.
  • The plan includes downloadable notes for students and teachers with suggested points for discussion.
  • Use the activity plan to direct a ‘jigsaw’-method of discussion where individuals within groups research and summarize their findings on varied selected topics related to black carbon, its impacts, and solutions and then re-group to summarize their findings in a ‘concept-map’ to represent all the aspects of discussion.

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about phenotypic plasticity in living organisms, as a response to environmental fluctuations.

This lesson plan allows students to understand the concept of phenotypic plasticity and to differentiate between acclimation and adaptation, in response to climate related abiotic factors. The lesson plan emphasizes how climatic conditions affect the morphology, physiology and behavior of organisms. It includes learning material that enables them to understand how phenotypic plasticity in plants help them to cope with climate change.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Leaf cells and chloroplasts

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is phenotypic plasticity?
  2. What is the difference between adaptation and acclimation? Illustrate with examples.
  3. How does phenotypic plasticity in plants help them to cope with climate change?
  4. How do changes in climatic conditions affect the morphology, physiology and behavior of organisms? Give examples.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by by Dr. Amit Vashishtha, Dr. Aditi Kothari-Chhajer and Dr. Neeti Mehla, Sri Venkateswara College, (Delhi University), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Phenotypic Plasticity, Adaptation

Acclimation, Abiotic Factors

Genetic Variation, Range Shift

Climate Topic Climate and the Biospheret
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-120 min

Contents

Reading and Associated Video

(~25 min)

A reading that explains what phenotypic plasticity is and how it helps an organism to survive under variable environmental conditions. It also explains the difference between adaptation and acclimation by organisms in response to a changing environment.

Go to the Reading

 

An associated video that reiterates the distinction between acclimation and adaptation and the role of phenotypic plasticity in helping an organism cope with changing climatic factors, with suitable examples.

Go to the associated video

(up to 10.22 min)

Classroom/ Laboratory activity

(35-95 min)

A lab activity that teaches students how the amount of available light for plants affects the phenotypic characteristics of their leaves.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Introduce the topic by playing a micro-lecture (video)

  1. Use the reading, ‘Coping with climate change’, by University of California Museum of Paleontology and National Center for Science Education, to teach your students how animals and plants respond to a changing environment by modifying their morphology, physiology and behavior.
  2. Explain what adaptation to a changing environment means for a living organism.
  3. Introduce the concept of phenotypic plasticity and explain how this enables an organism to cope with variable environmental conditions.
  4. Use the text to distinguish between acclimation and adaptation.
  5. Emphasize that adaptation is based on genetic variation in organisms and that the trait is passed on in successive generations to adapt to long term environmental changes.
  6. Explain that phenotypic plasticity enables organisms to cope with short term changes in the environment and do not have a genetic basis.

 

  1. Use the associated video, ’Coping with Climate Change- Evolution in the News’, by Dr. George Gilchrist, Professor of Biology, College of William and Mary, Virginia, to reiterate the concepts of phenotypic plasticity, acclimation and adaptation in organisms in response to a changing environment by discussing specific examples of plants and animals.
  2. Using examples from this video, explain how ‘range shift’ and ‘plasticity’ by organisms in response to climate change has limitations and can threaten the survival of several species.
  3. Go to the associated video  (up to 10.22 min)

OPTIONAL: (30-50 min)

Extend your students’ understanding of the topic by using the end of text ‘Discussion and extension questions’ from the reading resource, to enable a classroom discussion. Use the links to readings given here to assess the adaptation or phenotypic strategies adopted by specific plant and animal species. Explore the topic further using the links to ‘Related lessons and teaching resources’.

Step 2: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity

  1. Use this hands-on laboratory activity, ‘Developmental and Phenotypic Plasticity in Leaves’, by Radford University, Virginia, to study leaf morphology and phenotypic plasticity in plants.
  2. Download and print the activity worksheets for the students. Use the introductory text to remind students that despite being genetically identical, variations are observed in different plants of the same species due to phenotypic plasticity.
  3. Follow the instructions given in the worksheet to conduct the activity of collection and analysis of leaf morphology from plants in two different micro-environments: sun and shade.
  4. Use the data collected to compare the morphologies of leaves of plants exposed to these different light intensities.
  5. Encourage a classroom discussion using the questions given in the worksheet, to enable students to understand the role of phenotypic plasticity in helping plants cope with environmental differences: in this case, light intensity.
  6. Extend the discussion to include climatic factors such as rising temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, that can result in phenotypic changes as a coping strategy in plants.

Go to the Activity

As a high school or undergraduate Biological Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to teach about metabolism in living organisms, metabolic rate and factors affecting metabolic rate including the impact of increasing global temperatures due to climate change.

This lesson plan will enable students to understand the role of metabolism in living organisms and the various factors that influence it. Students will be able to understand how climate change could influence the metabolic rate of organisms and affect their physiology and survival. A hands-on lab activity will enable students to assess temperature driven changes in metabolic rate of ectotherms and endotherms.

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Biological Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is metabolism?
  2. What are the factors that influence the metabolic rate of an organism?
  3. How does the metabolism of organisms respond to climate change?
  4. Discuss the impact of increasing global temperatures on metabolic rate.
  5. Climate change could exert negative effects on reproduction in Ectotherms. Explain.

Teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Subhash Rajpurohit, Ahmedabad University, India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Photo : ANTHONY PAGANO/USGS

Find out more: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42909866

 

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Metabolism, Metabolic Rate, Factors affecting Metabolic Rate, Ectotherms, Endotherms

Homeotherms, Heterotherms, Thermoneutral Zone (TNZ)

Lower Critical Temperature (LCT), Upper Critical Temperature (UCT)

Climate and the Biosphere
Location Global
Language(s) English
Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
90 – 120 min

Contents

Reading

(15 min)

A reading that introduces the topic of metabolism and metabolic rate in living organisms and describes the factors influencing it.

Go to the Reading

Reading

(15 min)

A reading that describes the impact of increasing global temperatures on the metabolic rates of cold-blooded animals- ectotherms.

Go to the Reading

Video
(1.45 min)
A short video that shows why climate related melting ice forces polar bears to invest five times more energy in swimming rather than walking and thus, impacts their survival rates.

Go to the Video

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity

( 60-90 min)

A classroom/laboratory activity to measure the metabolic rate in living organisms and note changes under diverse temperatures; to gain insight on the possible effect of rising temperatures due to climate change on the metabolic rates of these organisms.

Go to the Activity

 

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1:  Introduce the topic with a reading

  1. Introduce the topic of metabolism and metabolic rate using the reading ‘Metabolic rate’ by Khan Academy.
  2. Discuss the various factors that influence the metabolic rate in animals.
  3. Use the text to describe endotherms and ectotherms.
  4. Explain how endotherms and ectotherms are affected by the ambient temperature of their surroundings
  5. Use this reading to define basal metabolic rate (BMR) in living organisms and how it affects energy expenditure by them.

Go to the Reading

Step 2 : Discuss the impact of climate change on metabolic rate

Use the reading, ‘Global metabolic impacts of recent climate change’ by Dillon et al, October 2010, Nature 467(7316):704-6, to explain to your students how tropical ectotherms that constitute a large percentage of Earth’s biodiversity, could be more severely affected by rising temperatures due to climate change.

Go to the Reading

Step 3: Play a video

  1. Play the video, ‘When ice melts, polar bear use 5x more energy to swim instead of walk’ by Blaine Griffen, Brigham Young University, to explain the possible influence of climate change- melting ice caps due to rising temperatures- on the metabolic rate of the polar bear leading to higher energy expenditure and resultant body weight loss.
  2. Use this video to explain how this effect on metabolism lowers the reproductive rates and affects the survival of the species.

Go to the Video

Step 4: Conduct a classroom/laboratory activity

  1. Use this laboratory activity, ‘Animal Metabolism’ by Saddleback College, California, to enable students to test the effect of varying temperatures on the metabolic rates of an endotherm (mouse/rat) and an ectotherm (goldfish).
  2. Firstly, use the information given in the worksheets to explain to the students the thermoneutral zone (TNZ), lower critical temperature (LCT) and upper critical temperature (UCT) for all organisms.
  3. Explain why it differs for different types of organisms.
  4. Use the worksheet instructions to explain the different ways in which the metabolic rates for these organisms is determined and to set up the experiments.
  5. Instruct the students to make graphs of the results and to compare the changes in metabolic rates of the organisms in response to changing temperature.
  6. Discuss the results of these experiments in the context of global temperature rise due to climate change.

Go to the Activity

 

 

Mapped Sustainable Development Goal(s), apart from 4 and 13

Video : When ice melts, polar bears use 5x more energy to swim instead of walk | Brigham Young University

As a High School or Undergraduate Economics or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about poverty, the impact of climate change on global poverty and the ways to manage it in the current and future scenarios.

As a High School or Undergraduate Economics or Social Sciences teacher, you can use this set of computer-based tools to help you in teaching about poverty, the impact of climate change on global poverty and the ways to manage it in the current and future scenarios.

This lesson plan includes reading resources to teach students about poverty, how it is exacerbated by climate change and the measures needed to manage it using the guidelines provided by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Thus, the use of this lesson plan allows you to integrate the teaching of a climate science topic with a core topic in Economics or Social Sciences.

Use this lesson plan to help your students find answers to:

  1. Define poverty and briefly explain its causes.
  2. What is the ‘vicious circle of poverty’? How can the poverty cycle be broken?
  3. ‘It is the poor who are affected most by climate change’. Do you agree? Give reasons in support of your answer.
  4. Explain the impact of climate change on poor women and children.
  5. How are the struggles against poverty and climate change interlinked?
  6. What policies and actions are needed to mitigate climate change as well as reduce poverty?

A teacher-contributed lesson plan by Dr. Ameeta Motwani, Jesus and Mary College (University of Delhi), India.

Want to know more about how to contribute? Contact us.

Photo collage : Climate scenarios, global climate reports NOAA image-landscapes

Find out more: https://www.noaa.gov/news/march-2019-was-second-hottest-on-record-for-globe

About Lesson Plan

Grade Level High school, Undergraduate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Poverty, Absolute or Extreme Poverty, Poverty Trap
Poverty Cycle, Human Development
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Climate Adaptation
Climate Mitigation, Disaster Management, Resilience, Inequality
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Location Global
Language(s) English

Some resources are also available in Spanish, French, Arabic and Russian

Access Online, Offline
Approximate
Time Required
60-80 min

Contents

Reading

(~45-60 min)

A chapter reading that defines what is poverty, poverty in the context of a country’s economy, and the causes for poverty, with reference to South-East Asian countries. It also describes the relationship of climate change and poverty and outlines strategies to counteract the impacts of climate change.

Go to the Reading

(Refer Chapter VII)

Reading

(15 min)

A feature story on a comprehensive report by the World Bank that describes the threat of climate change to poor people and the ways to offset it through adaptation and mitigation strategies. This story is available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic and Russian.

Go to the Reading

Here is a step-by-step guide to using this lesson plan in the classroom/laboratory. We have suggested these steps as a possible plan of action. You may customize the lesson plan according to your preferences and requirements.

Step 1: Topic introduction and discussion (Go to the Reading)

Use this chapter reading, ‘Chapter VII: Impact of Climate Change on POVERTY’ from a teachers’ guidebook on climate change, ‘Integrating Climate Change Issues in Southeast Asian Schools’ by the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) to introduce to your class the topic of poverty and to discuss various aspects of it through a close reading of the text.

  1. Use the reading to first define poverty and to explain that the definition of ‘poverty’ is not the same for all nations and that it is based on the country’s level of economic progress.
  2. Explain the causes of poverty and therefore, parameters like access to food, water, shelter, healthcare, infrastructure and education that define the state of well-being or poverty of a nation’s population.
  3. Discuss, using the text, the causes for varying proportions of poor people in different nations with emphasis on the Southeast Asian countries.
  4. Explain terms like ‘absolute or extreme poverty’ and ‘poverty trap’ to describe the various degrees of poverty across the social strata within a society.
  5. Use the text to discuss how poverty disproportionately affects women, children and the elderly or infirm, making them more vulnerable to the impacts of poverty.
  6. Using figure 7.2, pg. 258, explain what the poverty cycle is and its implications across generations.
  7. Further, discuss the relationship between poverty and climate change. Explain how they are interconnected and using figure 7.1, pg 255, explain the impacts of climate change on poverty. Emphasize how climate change exacerbates poverty and therefore, the vulnerabilities of the poor. Use the reading to comment on how poverty in turn adversely affects climate change.
  8. Using the text, define and discuss climate adaptation, climate mitigation, disaster management, and resilience building measures to deal with climate change.
  9. Identify the basic causes of poverty- lack of income, access and power- and describe ways in which these problems can be addressed by countries.
  10. Finally, stress on the need for government policies to alleviate poverty and to tackle climate change, the two major challenges for sustainable global development.

Step 2 : Explore the topic further (Go to the Reading)

Use this feature story, ‘Rapid, Climate-Informed Development Needed to Keep Climate Change from Pushing More than 100 Million People into Poverty by 2030’, by the World Bank to talk about the findings of a comprehensive report published by them, ‘Shock Waves: Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty’. The link to the full report can be found in the additional resources section. This feature story is available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic and Russian.

  1. Play the video, ‘Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty’, by the World Bank Group to highlight the need for policies to manage the effects of climate change in order to protect the poor, that are worse affected by it.
  2. Read the text to emphasize to your students that measures taken to eradicate global poverty are thwarted by climate related factors and therefore, there is a need to address climate change in conjunction with poverty alleviating development work.
  3. Use the infographic, ‘Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty’, to walk your students through the impacts of climate change on poor people, the implications of inaction on climate change related factors for global poverty and the ways to address both issues of poverty and climate change through ‘climate smart development’.