Video/Micro Lecture: A Commentary on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s The Climate of History: Four Theses

A short video commentary  by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India  on ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’ by Dipesh Chakrabarty. This video commentary summarizes Dipesh Chakrabarty’s essay on the link between history, literature and climate change. Dodd summarizes the four theses posed by Chakrabarty in his essay.   

Students will learn about the link between climate change and history of the human species and the planet. They will specifically learn about the ‘Anthropocene’ and the four theses that Dipesh Chakraborty poses to better understand the evolution of human history and the environment.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between human history and environmental history.
  2. What are the four theses posed by Dipesh Chakrabarty in his essay? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Commentary By Maya Dodd on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineAnthropocene, History, Literature, Fiction, Non-fiction, Environmental Humanities 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (5 min 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, Pune, India for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU
Linkhttps://videos.files.wordpress.com/G0y5ng1D/m-dodd_video-micro-lecture_dcfourtheses_hd.mp4
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Dipesh Chakrabarty ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’

An essay by Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago titled ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’  that discusses the link between human history and climate change. The reading discusses the environmental history of the planet, the ‘Anthropocene’ and how humans have become geological agents with respect to climate change. Chakrabarty presents four arguments in his essay. These are 

  • Thesis 1: The distinction between natural and human history is a distinction that has to be dropped in this new era. 
  • Thesis 2 talks about the emergence of humans as a geological force and how this “severely qualifies humanist histories of modernity/ globalization”. 
  • Thesis 3: The Anthropocene requires us to put global histories of capital in conversation with the species history of humans. 
  • Thesis 4 talks about how we can probe the limits of historical understanding by the cross hatching of species history and capital history.

Students will learn about the ‘Anthropocene’ and the link between environmental history and human history. They will further understand the relationship between global histories of capital and the species history of humans.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does the crisis of climate change spell the collapse of the distinction between natural history and human history?
  2. What is the idea of the ‘Anthropocene’ and how does it qualify humanist theories of freedom?
  3. How do you reconcile the global histories of capital and the species history of humans in the Anthropocene?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Climate of History: Four Theses
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Cultural Studies, Anthropocene, Environmental History 
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDipesh Chakrabarty The Climate of History: Four Theses Critical Inquiry (Vol 35 No. 2) 
Hosted atFaculty of Law, University of Victoria, Canada
Linkhttp://www.law.uvic.ca/demcon/2013%20readings/Chakrabarty%20-%20Climate%20of%20History.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: What is Cli-Fi?

A video micro lecture by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, that discusses the genre of climate fiction (Cli-Fi). The video introduces this new genre of writing and includes definitions by contemporary artists, authors and filmmakers. This video further highlights new sub-genres such as ‘anthropocene fiction’ and ‘solar punk’ that have their origins in Cli-Fi.

Students will learn about the new genre of climate fiction in literature. They will also learn how authors, artists, and filmmakers portray the current global crisis and their challenges. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is climate fiction (Cli-Fi)? 
  2. How can Cli-Fi inform and provide solutions to help mitigate climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameWhat is Cli-Fi?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature, Anthropocene Fiction, Solar Punk
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (2 mins 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9XuxHtfOxQ
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Climate Change and Human Evolution

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the impacts of climate change on human evolution and early civilizations. This video lecture is part 1 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn how climate change possibly impacted speciation, bipedalism, evolution of brain size, cultural evolution and the appearance and disappearance of certain ancient civilizations. They will also learn about the impact of various glacial and interglacial periods, East-African aridification, and changes in sea surface temperature and rainfall on human evolution and history during the Pleistocene. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How has climate change potentially impacted our evolution from apes to Homo sapiens?
  2. Explain the relationship between plate tectonics, El Nino patterns and human evolution.
  3. Discuss examples of species extinction by early human in Africa and Australia. 

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L01 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 01
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Evolution, Anthropology, Human History, Early Civilizations, Bipedalism,  East-African Aridification
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere, Climate and Biosphere, Climate Variability Record
Type of toolVideo (42 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Capitalism and Global Warming

A reading by Jonathan T. Park, University of Utah, that discusses the link between climate change and capitalism. This reading discusses how consumer ideology in a capitalist society results in the overproduction and overconsumption of goods. It includes discussions on exploitation of natural resources, high energy expenditure, excess waste production and extensive environmental degradation due to pollution.

Students will learn how capitalist modes of production require large scale burning of fossil fuels to meet energy requirements that contribute towards global warming. They will also learn how the capitalist model can be modified for a sustainable future.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are capitalist modes of production?
  2. Discuss the relationship between capitalist modes of production, fossil fuel burning and global warming.

About the Tool 

Tool Name Climate Change and Capitalism
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Capitalist Modes of Production, Rise of Capitalism, Consumerism, Materials Economy, Commodification, Fossil Fuels, Natural Resources
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Jonathan T. Park
Hosted at University of Utah
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Video: Who Is Responsible For Climate Change? Who Needs To Fix It?

This video gives an overview of global climate change, historical and annual carbon emissions, and biggest and smallest contributors to the emissions. This video is part of a series about climate change supported by Breakthrough Energy

Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Climate Change and Food Security in Africa

A classroom/laboratory activity to learn about suitable climatic conditions for a crop and to determine how climate change may affect food production (specifically, cocoa production).

Visualization, Classroom/Laboratory Activity: A Story Map on Climate Change and Human Migration

A visualization and classroom/laboratory activity to learn about regions and communities that are affected by the problem of climate refugees and environmental migration because of the effects of climate change.

Has Humanity Pushed Earth into a New Geological Epoch: the “Anthropocene?”

In this audio podcast from the Climate History Podcast, “Professor Dagomar Degroot interviews Professor John McNeill (Georgetown University) about the Anthropocene: the proposed geological epoch in which Earth’s environment is most profoundly shaped by humanity.”

Teaching Module: The Impact of ENSO and Human Activities on River Hydrology (a case study of the Huanghe River)

A teaching module to learn about the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) by performing calculations and analyzing results for Tahiti and Darwin (Australia), and for the Huanghe River in China.

UNESCO Short Course: Climate Change in the Classroom

This is a UNESCO course for secondary teachers on climate change education for sustainable development. As mentioned by UNESCO, this six day course supports teacher education institutions to introduce climate change education into their pre-service and in-service training programme. The course is designed to give teachers confidence in facilitating climate change education for sustainable development across the curriculum and inside and outside the classroom. The course suggests that the teaching of climate change should go beyond the science classroom. It proposes a pedagogical framework, exercises, regional resource and facilitation guidelines to teacher educators.