Video/ Microlecture: Quantum Physics

A microlecture that describes the photoelectric effect and how it works with respect to greenhouse gases. This video by Shohini Ghose for TEDxVictoria describes how light and matter possess energy and how the transfer of this energy occurs between different bodies.

Students will learn briefly about the discovery of the photoelectric effect and its relevance to quantum physics. They will further be introduced to various technologies, such as solar cells, which utilize this phenomenon and how they may help combat global warming. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Describe the photoelectric effect.
  2. Describe the greenhouse effect. 
  3. Discuss the various technologies discussed in the video that utilize the photoelectric effect that may help combat global warming.

About the tool

Tool NameHow Quantum Physics Can Help Us Fight Climate Change
DisciplinePhysics, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineQuantum Physics, Photoelectric Effect, Photons, Wavelengths of Light, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation, Greenhouse Effect, Solar Cells, Quantum Entanglement
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (15 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byShohini Ghose
Hosted atTEDxVictoria
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change

A reading that describes natural carbon sources and sinks. This reading by Noelle Eckley Selin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes how anthropogenic activities alter the concentration of carbon in various sources and sinks, thus, contributing to global warming.

Students will learn about the various types of carbon sinks and sources. They will further understand the importance of the removal of this excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using technologies for carbon capture and storage, and carbon sequestration.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the natural sources and sinks of carbon on Earth?
  2. Discuss the importance of carbon sequestration for climate mitigation.
  3. Discuss carbon sequestration through carbon capture and storage technologies.

About the tool

Tool NameCarbon Sequestration
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Sequestration, Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate and the Biosphere; Climate and the Lithosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNoelle Eckley Selin
Hosted atBritannica
Linkhttps://www.britannica.com/technology/carbon-sequestration
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

E-Learning Courses on Climate Change

Series of two E-Learning Courses on Introduction to Climate Change and Climate Science

Following are two online courses in Climate Change and Climate Science by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

Reading: Carbon Sequestration in Soil

A reading by Judith D. Schwatz for YaleE360, published at the Yale School of the Environment, that describes how carbon is stored in soil. It discusses carbon sequestration, carbon capture and storage and carbon sources and sinks. It further highlights how the release of carbon from the soil due to anthropogenic activities can cause global warming. 

Students will learn about ‘soil carbon’ and its role in sequestering carbon dioxide. They will understand the importance of land restoration and some of the techniques and methods utilised to improve soil quality. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘carbon sequestration’?
  2. Discuss the role of soil in the carbon cycle?
  3. Describe some of the methods used to restore land. 

About the tool

Tool NameSoil as Carbon Storehouse: New Weapon in Climate Fight?
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Carbon Sequestration, Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate and the Lithosphere; Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJudith D. Schwatz 
Hosted atYaleE360, published at the Yale School of the Environment
Linkhttps://e360.yale.edu/features/soil_as_carbon_storehouse_new_weapon_in_climate_fight
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Teaching Differentiating Functions through Solar Energy Data

A classroom/ laboratory activity titled, ‘Country Photovoltaic Energy Production’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Ithaca College, USA, to teach differentiating functions – logistic and exponential, using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes data of photovoltaic (solar) energy production of several countries from 1990 to 2016.

This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided. 

Students will learn how to apply their understanding of logistic and exponential functions and apply the Quotient (or Product) Rule to describe the rates of increase of photovoltaic energy production over time in several countries such as Germany, Italy, and USA, amongst others, in recent times. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are differentiating functions?
  2. Distinguish between logarithmic, exponential, and logistic differentiating functions.
  3. How has the rate of global solar energy production changed since 1990?
  4. How do the rates of solar energy production in select countries (from the given datasets) differ from that of the World?
  5. Discuss how the use of photovoltaic energy can be a viable alternative to fossil fuels to combat global warming.

About the Tool

Tool NameCountry Photovoltaic Energy Production
DisciplineMathematics and Statistics
Topic(s) in DisciplineLogarithmic, Exponential, Logistic Differentiating Functions, Quotient or Product Rule
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolClassroom/Laboratory Activity
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byThomas J. Pfaff
Hosted atSustainability Math 
Linkhttp://sustainabilitymath.org/calculus-materials/
AccessOnline, Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Differentiation and Wind Energy

A classroom/ laboratory activity titled, ‘Wind Energy by Selected Countries and World’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Ithaca College, USA, to teach polynomial and logistic differentiation using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes wind energy production data of several countries from 1980 to 2016.

This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet.The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.

Students will learn how to apply their understanding of polynomial and logistic differentiation and apply the Quotient (or Product) Rule to describe the rates of increase of wind energy production over time in countries such as China, Spain, USA, and the World.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are differentiating functions?
  2. Describe polynomial and logistic differentiation using examples.
  3. How has the rate of global wind energy production changed since 1980?
  4. How do the rates of wind energy production in select countries (from the given datasets) differ from that of the World?
  5. Discuss how the use of wind energy can be a viable alternative to fossil fuels to combat global warming.

About the Tool

Tool NameWind Energy by Selected Countries and World
DisciplineMathematic and Statistics, 
Topic(s) in DisciplinePolynomial and Logistic Differentiation, Quotient or Product Rule
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate Variability Record
Type of toolClassroom/Laboratory Activity
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byThomas J. Pfaff
Hosted atSustainability Math 
Linkhttp://sustainabilitymath.org/calculus-materials/
AccessOnline, Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: World Petroleum Consumption

A classroom/ laboratory activity titled, ‘World Petroleum Consumption’ from Sustainability Math by Thomas J. Pfaff, Ithaca College, USA, to teach integration using a hands-on computer-based classroom activity that includes world petroleum consumption data from 1980 to 2016

This data is provided in an Excel spreadsheet. The classroom activity also includes a Word document that contains directions on how to use different mathematical methods on the data provided.

Students will learn how to apply their understanding of the relationship between a function and its integral and to set up and solve equations with an integral to describe the trend of world petroleum consumption over time. Additionally, they will also be able to answer how this global petroleum consumption is responsible for carbon emissions that have contributed towards post-industrial age global warming.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the relationship between a function and its integral?
  2. How has the world petroleum consumption changed since 1980?

About the Tool

Tool NameWorld Petroleum Consumption
DisciplineMathematics and Statistics
Topic(s) in DisciplineIntegration, Integral Function, Function
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolClassroom/Laboratory Activity
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byThomas J. Pfaff
Hosted atSustainability Math 
Linkhttp://sustainabilitymath.org/calculus-materials/
AccessOnline, Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: Biogeochemical Cycles and Climate Change

A teaching module that discusses the carbon cycle and the nitrogen cycle. This reading by University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) describes the 2 cycles and details how the components are cycled through different parts of the Earth- atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere. 

Students will be introduced to biogeochemical cycles, the processes involved, and how the carbon and nitrogen cycles work. They will further understand how anthropogenic activities potentially alter the functioning of such cycles and how this contributes to climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the carbon cycle? Describe its components and processes.
  2. What is the nitrogen cycle? Describe its components and processes.
  3. Discuss how biogeochemical cycles influence Earth’s climate?

About the tool

Tool NameBiogeochemical Cycles
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Nitrogen Cycle, Sequestration, Capture and Storage, Sources and Sinks, Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate Topic Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms; Climate and the Atmosphere, Climate and the Biosphere; Climate and the Hydrosphere, Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Teaching Module
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byUniversity Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)
Hosted atUCAR Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Introduction to Climate Change Economics

A video micro lecture by David Archer, The University of Chicago, titled ‘The Economics of Climate Change’ which is  a part of an e-learning course on science and modelling of climate change. This video discusses the ‘tragedy of commons’ to understand how climate change impacts society. The lecture also introduces concepts like ‘external cost’, ‘internal cost’, ‘carbon tax’ and ‘cap and trade’ when discussing carbon emissions and pollution. Archer discusses the advantages of using economic mechanisms to ensure carbon emissions are controlled. 

Students will be introduced to the basic economics of climate change. They will also learn about the advantages of various economic schemes that can help ensure reduced carbon emissions and control environmental damage. Students will further learn about the ethical concerns that arise in the debate between the cost of climate change and the cost of mitigating climate change. 

 Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the ‘tragedy of commons’?
  2. Discuss the economics of climate change.
  3. Discuss the ethical concerns that arise due to climate change mitigation policies.

About the tool

Tool NameThe Economics of Climate Change from ‘Week 12: Mitigations’ of ‘Global Warming I: The Science and Modeling of Climate Change’ Coursera Course 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Economics, Tragedy of the Commons, External Cost, Carbon Tax, Cap and Trade, Carbon Emissions
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation 
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (9 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byDavid Archer, University of Chicago
Hosted atCoursera
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The COVID-19 Pandemic, Recession and Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy, Economic Recovery, Economic Policy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Conflict and water wars

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Classroom/ Laboratory activity: Climate Mitigation and Willingness to Pay

A classroom/laboratory activity based on data on citizens’ willingness to pay to reduce carbon emissions as a method of mitigating climate change. This data is collected through an online survey by the German government and is available for download in Excel, R, and Google Sheet formats.

Students will be able to analyse the data to construct indices for measuring attitudes or opinions. They will also learn to use Cronbach’s alpha and Likert scale. Additionally, they will use mean, standard deviation, correlation/correlation coefficient, and confidence interval to analyze the results. Through this activity, they will be able to compare the measures of willingness to pay with climate policymaking. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘willingness to pay’?
  2. How to measure willingness to pay for non-market goods like abatement to pollution?
  3. What is Cronbach’s alpha? How is it used to assess indices for internal consistency?

About the tool

Tool NameMeasuring Willingness to Pay for Climate Change Mitigation
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Likert Scale, Cronbach’s Alpha, Value of Abatement, Contingent Valuation, Climate Change Economics
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Classroom/ Laboratory Activity  
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCORE Project
Hosted atCORE Project Website
Linkhttps://www.core-econ.org/doing-economics/book/text/11-01.html
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsIntermediate

Reading: Willingness to Cooperate and Climate Policy

A reading titled ‘Cooperation in the Climate Commons’ by the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. This working paper describes the willingness to cooperate as a climate solution and how it is impacted by different mitigation efforts.

Students will learn how mitigation efforts depend either on an individual’s willingness to voluntarily adapt ‘green’ consumer behaviour or through enforcement of costly public policy or a combination of the two. They will further study how various factors, such as peer pressure, social interventions, individual beliefs, trust in economic development, and local punishment policies, impact mitigation efforts. They will also learn how international and domestic climate policy affects individuals’ willingness to cooperate. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are ‘climate commons?
  2. How does willingness to cooperate through voluntary adaptation of green consumer behaviour differ from forceful implementation of costly public policy?
  3. What is the ‘zero-contribution’ proposition and why did the study reject it?

About the tool

Tool NameCooperation in the Climate Commons
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Theory, Willingness to Cooperate, Public Policy, Climate Commons, Global Commons, Tragedy of the Commons, Mitigation, Economic Policy, Tragedy of the Commons
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. Authored by Stefano Carattini, Simon Levin and Alessandro Tavoni
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, UK
Linkhttps://www.cccep.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/working-paper-259-Carattini-et-al.pdf?from_serp=1
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Willingness to Pay for Climate Stability

A review article by Evan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on willingness to pay (WTP) for climate policy. This working paper is divided into five sections as follows:

  1. Section 1 describes the characteristics of WTP as an empirical tool for climate stability.
  2. Section 2 discusses literature review on WTP for climate policy, through to social and behavioural aspects.
  3. Section 3 explains calculations used and the results of comparison of various studies.
  4. Section 4 discusses a new research agenda to improve factors for identifying WTP.
  5. Section 5 concludes the study.

Students will learn about WTP in context to climate stability and the need to study it. They will also learn about which factors are commonly used to identify WTP and how they are calculated through empirical assessment. Additionally they will also learn about the challenges of using the current factors in determining the WTP and what can be done to improve its measurement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is willingness to pay (WTP)?
  2. How is WTP calculated with regards to climate policy?
  3. What factors are commonly used to define willingness to change and how can they be improved?

About the tool

Tool NameWillingness to Pay for Climate Policy: A Review of Estimates
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Economic Theory, Public Policy, Integrated Assessment Model, Consumer Psychology, Economic Policy
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEvan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hosted atSocial Science Research Network Website
Linkhttps://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1626931
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Post-pandemic Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 3

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains discussions on the need to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the subsequents cost of doing the same. The reading is subdivided into seven chapters, as follows:

  1. Projecting the growth of greenhouse gas emissions: This chapter discusses the past drivers of global emissions growth and a future prediction with ‘business-as-usual’ scenario in case of climate policy inaction.  [pp 169 – 192 (as per table of contents) or pp 214- 237 (as per scrolling)]
  2. The challenge of stabilisation: This chapter details steps that can be taken to stabilise GHG emissions and the cost of delay. [pp 193 – 210 (as per table of contents) or pp 238 – 255 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Identifying the costs of mitigation: This chapter looks at how mitigation costs are identified for various methods to reduce GHG emissions, who will pay for them, and what will be the long-term impacts of GHG cost-cutting. [pp 211 – 238 (as per table of contents) or pp 256 – 283(as per scrolling)]
  4. Macroeconomic models of costs: This chapter goes into the modelling approaches to calculate costs, the factors that may impact these costs, and how GHG emission cost-cutting might affect GDP. [pp 239 – 252 (as per table of contents) or pp 284 – 297 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Structural change and competitiveness: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate-change policies about market structure, trade, location and industrial emissions on market competitiveness.  [pp 253 – 268 (as per table of contents) or pp 298 – 313(as per scrolling)]
  6. Opportunities and wider benefits from climate policies: This chapter looks at the benefits and opportunities of climate change action for various industries and services and how it will impact the overall financial market.  [pp 269 -283 (as per table of contents) or pp 314 – 328 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Towards a goal for climate change policy: This chapter looks at cost-benefit analysis and climate change policy in the long run with a focus on fast changes to avoid adverse risks.  [pp 284 – 307 (as per table of contents) or pp 329 – 352(as per scrolling)]

Students will learn the cause of the rise in greenhouse gas emissions and how, due to advancement in energy technology, income growth is no longer solely dependent on emission growth. They will also learn that the benefits of climate change policies for markets and industries outweigh its costs in the long-run. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What will happen if we continue with the ‘business-as-usual’ scenario of greenhouse gas emissions?
  2. State cost-effective methods and techniques to reduce greenhouse gas emission.
  3. How does The Review calculate marginal costs and marginal benefits of climate change policy?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart III: The economics of stabilisation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Integrated Assessment Model, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 168 to 307) –  as per table of content; (pp 213 – 352) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change Part 5

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which analyses adaptation as a response to reducing vulnerability to climate change. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. Understanding the economics of adaptation: This section states the key adaptation concepts. It also gives an economic framework for the same. [pp 404 – 415 (as per table of contents) or pp 448 – 460 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Adaptation in the developed world: This section looks into the barriers and challenges to adaptation. It focuses on how developed countries can promote adaptation through policy and information dissemination. [pp 416 – 429 (as per table of contents) or pp 461 – 474 (as per scrolling)]
  3. The role of adaptation in sustainable development: This section looks at the challenges faced by developing countries in adapting to climate change and the emphasises the need for support from the international community. [pp 430 – 447 (as per table of contents) or pp 475 – 492 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how the cost of adaptation differs depending on the availability of infrastructure, financial capability and access to public services. They will also be able to calculate the cost of adaptation depending on if there are prior mitigation policies and different climate scenarios.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How effective are adaptation strategies to climate change?
  2. How does adaptation differ for developed and developing countries?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart V: Policy responses for adaptation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Economic Policy, Adaptation, Mitigation, Cost-Benefit Analysis
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolReading (pp 403 to 447) –  as per table of content; (pp 448 to 492) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change Part 6

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains various dimensions of action that will be needed to reduce the risk of climate change for mitigation and adaptation. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. Framework for understanding international collective action for climate change:  This section draws from game theory and international relations to provide a framework on international collective action and review the existing international co-operation. [pp 450 – 467 (as per table of contents) or pp 494- 511 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Creating a global price for carbon: This section looks at the challenge of creating a broadly comparable price for carbon around the world. It also considers what was effective from previous global conventions like the Kyoto Protocol and looks at the scope of expanding emissions trading schemes. [pp 468 – 489 (as per table of contents) or pp 512 – 533 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Supporting the transition to a low carbon global economy: This section discusses how diffusion of technology and investment in low carbon infrastructure can accelerate the transition towards a low carbon economy. It also explores Clean Development Mechanism and how carbon finance can be expanded to respond to the current scale of climate change. [pp 490 – 515 (as per table of contents) or pp 534 – 558 (as per scrolling)]
  4. Promoting effective international technology co-operation: This section analyses the impact of international co-operation in accelerating innovation in low-emission technologies for adaptation.  [pp 516 – 536 (as per table of contents) or pp 559 – 579 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Reversing emissions from land use change: This section looks at the opportunities available to reverse emissions from land use, specifically the challenge of providing economic incentives to reduce deforestation. [pp 537 – 553 (as per table of contents) or pp 580 – 596 (as per scrolling)]
  6. International support for adaptation: This section examines how international arrangements for adaptation can support national efforts and contribute to an equitable international approach. [pp 554 – 569 (as per table of contents) or pp 597 – 612 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Conclusions: This section concludes the finding of the Review and emphasises the importance of building and sustaining international collective action on climate change [pp 572 –621 (as per table of contents) or pp 613 – 662 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn about the importance and challenges of international collective action through existing frameworks of international conventions like the Kyoto Protocol. They will also learn about the technologies that can be adapted to transition to a low carbon economy and how this will differ for developing and developed countries.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How can international collective action help combat climate change?
  2. What are the steps needed to transition towards a low carbon economy?
  3. What international arrangements can be made to help developing countries adapt to climate change?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart VI: International Collective Action from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies, Game Theory, International Relations, Kyoto Protocol, Clean Development Mechanism
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolReading (pp 449 to 621) –  as per table of content; (pp 493 – 662) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic