Reading: Social Cost of Carbon 

A journal article by William Nordhaus on the critical role of the social cost of carbon (SCC) in determining climate change economics and policies. This paper estimates the SCC using the Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy (DICE model). 

Students will understand the application of the DICE model to calculate the SCC in the development of climate change policies. They will also learn how the SCC is central in climate change regulatory policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. “The most important single economic concept in the economics of climate change is the social cost of carbon (SCC).” Discuss.  
  2. Describe the DICE model and its application in determining the SCC.
  3. How does the SCC affect the economic growth of a country? Explain through examples

About the Tool 

Tool Name Revisiting the social cost of carbon
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Social Cost of Carbon, DICE model, Climate Change Policy, Climate Economics, Economic Policy, Econometrics
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by William D. Nordhaus (Yale University)
Hosted at Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Willingness to Pay for Climate Stability

A review article by Evan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on willingness to pay (WTP) for climate policy. This working paper is divided into five sections as follows:

  1. Section 1 describes the characteristics of WTP as an empirical tool for climate stability.
  2. Section 2 discusses literature review on WTP for climate policy, through to social and behavioural aspects.
  3. Section 3 explains calculations used and the results of comparison of various studies.
  4. Section 4 discusses a new research agenda to improve factors for identifying WTP.
  5. Section 5 concludes the study.

Students will learn about WTP in context to climate stability and the need to study it. They will also learn about which factors are commonly used to identify WTP and how they are calculated through empirical assessment. Additionally they will also learn about the challenges of using the current factors in determining the WTP and what can be done to improve its measurement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is willingness to pay (WTP)?
  2. How is WTP calculated with regards to climate policy?
  3. What factors are commonly used to define willingness to change and how can they be improved?

About the tool

Tool NameWillingness to Pay for Climate Policy: A Review of Estimates
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Economic Theory, Public Policy, Integrated Assessment Model, Consumer Psychology, Economic Policy
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEvan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hosted atSocial Science Research Network Website
Linkhttps://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1626931
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Long-term Cost of Climate Change

A reading by Louise Lerner, The University of Chicago, that summarises the economic cost of carbon as viewed from the perspective of geologists. This research challenges the traditional cost of carbon, which has been priced at $100 per ton of carbon emission, by stating the cost of carbon to be between $10,000 to $750,000 depending on the geophysical and economic scenarios.

Students will learn about the cost of carbon, discount rate, climate models, and socioeconomic costs amongst others. They will learn the difference between short term and long term carbon cost modelling and why a carbon cost of $100 does not give a holistic scenario of the impacts of carbon emissions.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘cost of carbon’ imply?
  2. What is the difference between the traditional cost of carbon and the new cost of carbon calculated in this reading?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate change will ultimately cost humanity $100,000 per ton of carbon, scientists estimate
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Economic Cost, Social Cost of Carbon, Cost of Carbon, Discount Rate
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byLouise Lerner,  University of Chicago
Hosted atPhys.org by Science X Network
Linkhttps://phys.org/news/2020-09-climate-ultimately-humanity-ton-carbon.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Global Warming – A Negative Externality

A short video by Hoesung Lee, Korea University and vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on carbon pricing and climate change. The video discusses the importance of putting a price on carbon emissions and related activities since climate change is an example of a global externality. Lee further explains the linkages of the environment with

 economic growth and development. 

Students will learn the concept of global warming as a negative externality. They will also understand the importance of putting a price on carbon emissions to reduce global warming and the need for global cooperation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are negative externalities in economics?
  2. What are the negative externalities associated with climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameHoesung Lee on carbon pricing
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineExternality, Negative Externality, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Environmental Protection
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (2 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCarbon Brief
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Wm8-eYdMm0
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Post-pandemic Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 1

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains a compilation of the scientific evidence of human caused climate change, its analysis through economic theory, and discussion on possible alternatives for development. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. The Science of Climate Change: This chapter provides scientific evidence to link the increase in greenhouse gases to climate change along with its impact at the regional and global level. [pp 1 – 22 (as per table of contents) or pp 46 – 67 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Economics, Ethics and Climate Change: This chapter discusses the externalities and the cost-benefit analysis of climate change. It focuses on the risks and uncertainty it may pose to free markets, economic policies, welfare, equity, justice, freedoms and rights. [pp 23 – 40 (as per table of contents) or pp 68 – 85 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Ethical Frameworks and Intertemporal Equity:​​ This chapter looks at the relevance of some technical frameworks such as – intertemporal appraisal, cost-benefit analysis, and discounting, in tackling various challenges posed by climate change. [pp 41 – 54 (as per table of contents) or pp 86 – 99 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how to analyse climate change through the lens of economics. They will also learn about the economic activities that have contributed most to greenhouse gas emissions and the possible policy challenges that may arise from it.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does an increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases cause global warming?
  2. State some of the economic risks and uncertainties caused due to a rise in greenhouse gas emissions?
  3. What is discounting? How is this method used to calculate the economic risks in the Stern Review?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart I: Climate Change: Our Approach from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Economic Risk, Economic Policy, Cost-Benefit analysis, Discounting, Uncertainty
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolReading (pp 1 to 54 ) –  as per table of contents; (pp 46 – 99) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change Part 4

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which looks at policy response to climate change. Some of the main policies discussed in this reading are carbon pricing, technology advancement, and policies related to availability of information and consumer behaviour. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. Harnessing markets to reduce emissions: This section looks at the types of carbon pricing and policy designs focusing on taxation and trading.  It also discusses the difference between the two and how taxation and trading impacts regional and global policy makers differently. [pp 309 – 323 (as per table of contents) or pp 354 – 368 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Carbon pricing and emission markets in practice: This section looks at the practicality of carbon pricing and its application in various sectors. It mainly focuses on the credibility, flexibility and predictability in policy design for carbon pricing. [pp 324 – 346 (as per table of contents) or pp 369 – 391 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Accelerating technological innovation: This section focuses on the motivation behind technology policies specifically focusing on sectors such as power generation, transportation and energy use. It also states the need to invest in R&D for improving existing technologies. [pp 347 – 376 (as per table of contents) or pp 392 – 421 (as per scrolling)]
  4. Beyond carbon markets and technology: This section looks at consumer behaviour and policies that remove barriers that stop individuals from taking action. It also looks at how policies can be used to influence preferences and behaviours – focusing mainly on the energy sector. [pp 377 – 402 (as per table of contents) or pp  422 – 447 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn about economic policies that focus on reduction of carbon such as carbon pricing, cap and trade, energy production, usage and distribution policies and policies that can change consumer behaviour. They will get a holistic view of how economic policies are designed and how they impact individuals and key economic sectors.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is ‘Carbon Pricing’?What is the difference between carbon taxation and carbon trading?
  2. Is carbon pricing a practical solution to climate change? 
  3. What are some examples of efficient policy making in the energy sector? 

About the Tool

Tool NamePart IV: Policy responses for mitigation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies, Economics of Energy, Carbon Pricing, Cap and Trade
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolReading (pp 308 to 402) –  as per table of content; (pp 353 to 447 ) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change Part 5

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which analyses adaptation as a response to reducing vulnerability to climate change. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. Understanding the economics of adaptation: This section states the key adaptation concepts. It also gives an economic framework for the same. [pp 404 – 415 (as per table of contents) or pp 448 – 460 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Adaptation in the developed world: This section looks into the barriers and challenges to adaptation. It focuses on how developed countries can promote adaptation through policy and information dissemination. [pp 416 – 429 (as per table of contents) or pp 461 – 474 (as per scrolling)]
  3. The role of adaptation in sustainable development: This section looks at the challenges faced by developing countries in adapting to climate change and the emphasises the need for support from the international community. [pp 430 – 447 (as per table of contents) or pp 475 – 492 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how the cost of adaptation differs depending on the availability of infrastructure, financial capability and access to public services. They will also be able to calculate the cost of adaptation depending on if there are prior mitigation policies and different climate scenarios.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How effective are adaptation strategies to climate change?
  2. How does adaptation differ for developed and developing countries?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart V: Policy responses for adaptation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Economic Policy, Adaptation, Mitigation, Cost-Benefit Analysis
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolReading (pp 403 to 447) –  as per table of content; (pp 448 to 492) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change Part 6

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains various dimensions of action that will be needed to reduce the risk of climate change for mitigation and adaptation. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. Framework for understanding international collective action for climate change:  This section draws from game theory and international relations to provide a framework on international collective action and review the existing international co-operation. [pp 450 – 467 (as per table of contents) or pp 494- 511 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Creating a global price for carbon: This section looks at the challenge of creating a broadly comparable price for carbon around the world. It also considers what was effective from previous global conventions like the Kyoto Protocol and looks at the scope of expanding emissions trading schemes. [pp 468 – 489 (as per table of contents) or pp 512 – 533 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Supporting the transition to a low carbon global economy: This section discusses how diffusion of technology and investment in low carbon infrastructure can accelerate the transition towards a low carbon economy. It also explores Clean Development Mechanism and how carbon finance can be expanded to respond to the current scale of climate change. [pp 490 – 515 (as per table of contents) or pp 534 – 558 (as per scrolling)]
  4. Promoting effective international technology co-operation: This section analyses the impact of international co-operation in accelerating innovation in low-emission technologies for adaptation.  [pp 516 – 536 (as per table of contents) or pp 559 – 579 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Reversing emissions from land use change: This section looks at the opportunities available to reverse emissions from land use, specifically the challenge of providing economic incentives to reduce deforestation. [pp 537 – 553 (as per table of contents) or pp 580 – 596 (as per scrolling)]
  6. International support for adaptation: This section examines how international arrangements for adaptation can support national efforts and contribute to an equitable international approach. [pp 554 – 569 (as per table of contents) or pp 597 – 612 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Conclusions: This section concludes the finding of the Review and emphasises the importance of building and sustaining international collective action on climate change [pp 572 –621 (as per table of contents) or pp 613 – 662 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn about the importance and challenges of international collective action through existing frameworks of international conventions like the Kyoto Protocol. They will also learn about the technologies that can be adapted to transition to a low carbon economy and how this will differ for developing and developed countries.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How can international collective action help combat climate change?
  2. What are the steps needed to transition towards a low carbon economy?
  3. What international arrangements can be made to help developing countries adapt to climate change?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart VI: International Collective Action from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies, Game Theory, International Relations, Kyoto Protocol, Clean Development Mechanism
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of toolReading (pp 449 to 621) –  as per table of content; (pp 493 – 662) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Nuclear Energy, Security and Climate change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Classroom/Laboratory Activity: The Global Climate Change Game

An interactive classroom activity ‘The Global Climate Change Game’ by James Copestake and Tom Ellum, University of Bath, that applies theoretical economic concepts in the context of climate change. The game involves role-play by students to understand.international climate change negotiations between countries influenced by ethics and morals. The game introduces concepts like ‘green spending’ and ‘carbon tax’ and requires students to maximize their countries’ net benefit to avoid catastrophes. 

Students will learn about economic concepts that relate to climate change as well as understand how these concepts function in a global market. They will also learn about the economic decisions and incentives that countries take to reduce the effect of climate change on economic growth and development. Students will further learn about how public good and benefit influences these economic decisions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘green spending’?
  2. How does public good and benefit influence climate change negotiations?
  3. Compare countries and their greenhouse gas emissions and net economic growth.

About the tool

Tool NameThe Global Climate Change Game
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineGreen Spending, Carbon Tax, Climate Change Negotiations, Economic Growth
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Classroom/Laboratory Activity 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJames Copestake and Tom Ellum
Hosted atThe Economics Network 
Linkhttps://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/showcase/copestake_climate#Relating_the_game_to_theoretical_issues
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Capitalism and Global Warming

A reading by Jonathan T. Park, University of Utah, that discusses the link between climate change and capitalism. This reading discusses how consumer ideology in a capitalist society results in the overproduction and overconsumption of goods. It includes discussions on exploitation of natural resources, high energy expenditure, excess waste production and extensive environmental degradation due to pollution.

Students will learn how capitalist modes of production require large scale burning of fossil fuels to meet energy requirements that contribute towards global warming. They will also learn how the capitalist model can be modified for a sustainable future.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are capitalist modes of production?
  2. Discuss the relationship between capitalist modes of production, fossil fuel burning and global warming.

About the Tool 

Tool Name Climate Change and Capitalism
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Capitalist Modes of Production, Rise of Capitalism, Consumerism, Materials Economy, Commodification, Fossil Fuels, Natural Resources
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Jonathan T. Park
Hosted at University of Utah
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Marxism and Carbon Markets

A reading titled ‘Greening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets’ by Steffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog that discusses a Marxist assessment of carbon markets and their role in the evolution of global capitalism and climate change. The reading discusses four major marxist concepts: metabolic rift, capitalism and world ecology, uneven development and accumulation through dispossession, sub-imperialism, to establish a structure for an analysis of carbon markets. The reading further discusses the importance of understanding historical global capitalism development and its link to nature, especially within the Global South. 

Students will learn about Marx’s theories and carbon markets and their role in mitigating climate change. They will also learn about the concept of ‘greening capitalism’ and its role in the future of economic growth and development. Students will further learn about the importance of mapping and acknowledging historical global capitalism development to understand the current state of climate change in the Global South. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Greening Capitalism? 
  2. Explain the link between history, capitalism and nature in the Global South
  3. Carbon markets could affect capitalist dynamics to achieve a global sustainable economy. Discuss 

About the tool

Tool NameGreening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Greening Capitalism, Historical Materialism, Economic Policy, Marxism
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySteffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog
Hosted atResearch Gate
Linkhttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/239735675_Greening_Capitalism_A_Marxist_Critique_of_Carbon_Markets
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Audio: Climate Change and Real Estate Pricing

An audio interview that introduces the effects of climate change on real estate pricing. This interview is by Climate Cast, MPR News, with Ed Walter, Urban Land Institute Global CEO.

Students will learn how real estate firms view climate change and how rising sea levels, storm surges, and unprecedented flooding affects land prices. Through a case study, students will understand how climate change affects individual house locations and real estate pricing.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How are climate change and real estate related?
  2. What is the impact of climate change on land prices?
  3. How are large real estate firms addressing climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name Climate change risk showing up in real estate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Economics, Economics of Climate Change, Carbon Pricing, Economics of Fossil Fuels
Climate Topic Land Pricing, Real Estate Pricing, Disaster Management
Type of Tool Audio (5 mins)
Grade Level High-school, Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by BBC World Service (Paul Huttner)
Hosted at MPRNews
Link Audio Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic