Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on the Politics of Climate Change

A video lecture by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this video lecture, Ghosh discusses the politics of climate change. 

Students will understand the importance of political narratives in climate change writing. They will also learn about the parallel evolution of political narratives and rise in carbon emissions. Students will further understand why novelists often find it difficult to integrate politics and climate change in their writing. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the politics of climate change.
  2. Why is it important to discuss the evolution of political narratives and climate change?
  3. How do political movements influence literature?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePolitics, Climate Politics, Literature, Fiction
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (1 hr 15 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNoSxNTPFHU&t=8s
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: ‘The Great Derangement’: A conversation

A short discussion led by Dr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India on Amitav Ghosh’s book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’, that summarizes key points of Ghosh’s work.This video includes discussions on topics such as

  1. Why is climate change ‘unimaginable’ or ‘unthinkable’?
  2. Why does the missing narrative of climate change require the unmasking of ‘unbelievable choices’ we have made in the past?
  3. How did the rift in narrative between the human and the non-human come about? 
  4. How has the association of nature and culture evolved historically?
  5. How does Western individualism as opposed to non-Western collective values affect climate action?
  6. Why is there a need for a more philosophical approach with the contextualization of history to deal with global climate change?

Students will learn about the complex narrative of climate change and the challenges it poses to fiction. They will also learn about how non-fiction caters to a specific demographic and, therefore, the need to include climate change in fictional works to reach a wider audience. Students will also learn about the importance of using ‘realism’ as opposed to ‘surrealism’ as a way of communicating this global crisis. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why have climate change topics been underrepresented in fiction writing?
  2. What does Amitav Ghosh mean by ‘The Great Derangement’?
  3. How does the evolution of historical narratives influence contemporary narratives on climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Conversation on Amitav Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, History, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (19 min 30 sec)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr Maya Dodd with Paloma Chandrachud, FLAME University, India. Produced for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU platform
Linkhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1zF2VIWoF5_yJs_zzw5XLc42TskGhImu8/view
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

E-Learning Course: Atmospheric Science

A e-learning course titled, ‘Introduction to Atmospheric Science’ developed by C Balaji, IIT Madras, for National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL), India. This course contains video lectures on the following topics:

  1. Introduction
  2. Atmosphere-A brief survey (Pressure, Temperature and Chemical composition)
  3. Atmosphere-A brief survey contd … (Vertical structure of the atmosphere)
  4. Vertical structure of atmosphere contd … and The Earth system – Oceans
  5. The Earth system – Oceans Contd … and Marine biosphere
  6. The Earth system – Hydrological cycle
  7. The Earth system – Hydrological cycle contd … and Carbon cycle
  8. The Earth system – Carbon cycle contd…, and Carbon in the oceans Earth’s crust
  9. The Earth system – Carbon in the oceans Earth’s crust
  10. Atmospheric Thermodynamics- Introduction
  11. The hydrostatic equation
  12. Hypsometric equation and pressure at sea level
  13. Basic Thermodynamics
  14. Concept of air parcel and dry adiabatic lapse rate
  15. Potential temperature
  16. Skew-T ln-P chart
  17. Problems using Skew-T ln-P chart
  18. Problems using Skew-T ln-P chart.
  19. Problems using Skew-T ln-P chart..
  20. Lifting Condensation Level (LCL)
  21. Lifting condensation level Contd…
  22. Saturated Adiabatic and Psuedo-adiabatic processes
  23. Equivalent potential temperature and wet bulb potential temperature
  24. Normand’s rule – Chinook winds
  25. Problems on Chinook wind and static stability
  26. Static stability-Brunt-Visala frequency
  27. Conditional and convective instability
  28. Static stability – Problems using radiosonde data and skew T ln P chart
  29. The second law of thermodynamics – Clausius Clapeyron relation
  30. Clausius Clapeyron relation contd..
  31. Atmospheric radiation – Radiation laws
  32. Planck’s distribution and Inverse square law
  33. Physics of scattering, emission and absorption
  34. Physics of scattering, emission and absorption contd…
  35. Radiative Transfer Equation – Derivation
  36. Radiative Transfer Equation contd …
  37. Radiative heating profiles of the atmosphere
  38. Climate Dynamics – Introduction
  39. Climate sensitivity and feedback
  40. Climate change
  41. Atmospheric dynamics

A transcript on the lectures is also provided.

Students will be introduced to the various aspects of atmospheric sciences and learn about some of the key phenomena, theories and equations used to study it.  

About the tool

Tool NameIntroduction to Atmospheric Science
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Physics
Topic(s) in DisciplineAtmospheric Sciences, Earth system, Atmosphere, Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, Clausius Clapeyron, Planck’s law, Radiative Transfer, Radiation 
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Type of tool E – Learning Course
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byC Balaji, IIT Madras
Hosted atNPTEL
Linkhttps://nptel.ac.in/courses/119/106/119106008/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio/Reading: Air Travel and Carbon Offset

A short audio and reading by MPR News on ‘Carbon Offset’ that gives an overview of what carbon offsets mean and how you can purchase them. It talks about the emission reduction that is linked to the travel industry through the principle of carbon credit.

Students will learn about carbon credit, emissions reduction, and carbon offset in the airline travel industry. They will also learn how consumers of air travel can buy carbon offsets to reduce individual carbon footprint and reduce deforestation.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is carbon offsetting?
  2. How can buying carbon credit reduce individual carbon emission?

About the Tool

Tool NameCarbon offsets 101: How they work and how to get the biggest bang for your buck
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Credit, carbon Offset, Emission reduction, Greenhouse Gas Reduction, Carbon Footprint
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolAudio (7 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byPaul Huttner and Megan Burks
Hosted atMPR News
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: Economic Trade-offs

A teaching module titled ‘Choices’ from a course on climate change by the Fraser Institute. This teaching module will help students understand the importance of trade-offs and evaluate the costs and benefits of climate change proposals.

Students will learn about carbon emissions, trade-offs, opportunity costs, and resource use. They will be exposed to two types of trade-offs: resource trade-offs and policy trade-offs. Through the ‘Birthday Money’ activity, students will learn how cost can be managed given a fixed income and how increase in costs can impact overall resource use and distribution.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Given the annual income of your household, how will housing costs change with a 10% rise in costs due to climate change?
  2. What are the trade-offs made by policy makers in order to meet the demands of stakeholders?

About the Tool

Tool NameChapter 6: Choices from Understanding Climate Change: Lesson Plans for the Classroom
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineTrade-offs, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Opportunity Costs, Emission Costs, Carbon Trade-offs, Economic Policy
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolTeaching Module
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byFraser Institute
Hosted atFraser Institute Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline/ Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Climate Change and Trade Policies

A classroom/ laboratory activity by Alan Green, Stetson University, that uses a team debate approach for a two-step discussion on trade policies. The first step is a discussion on the long term trend of declining employment in manufacturing in the U.S. The second step is a discussion on the challenge of climate change and international trade agreements.

Students will learn to apply economic models and analysis to support their arguments on relevant policy issues. They will also learn about protectionist measures, demand-supply analysis, direct and indirect compensation, manufacturing trends, and international trade. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are some protectionist policies to counter decline in manufacturing?
  2. How is international trade impacted by climate change?
  3. How can trade agreements be more inclusive of climate change threats?

About the Tool

Tool NameTrade Applications: Addressing the Decline of Manufacturing and the Challenge of Climate Change Through Trade Policy
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Trade, Trade Policy, Trade Agreements, Demand and Supply, International Trade
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolClassroom/ Laboratory Activity (50-75 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byAlan Green, Stetson University
Hosted atStarting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Climate Action and Capitalism

An audio conversation between Jason Jay, director of the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, and Rajesh Kasturirangan and Curt Newton, from The Climate Conversations, to discuss the role of market forces and government regulation in climate action. They discuss the theoretical framework of capitalism – its heroic value as well as exploitative nature. They also analyse geopolitical interests in fossil fuels and alternative energies, and the challenges of transitioning to green energy.

Students will learn about climate action and climate justice at an individual level through parallels from geopolitical discussions. They will also learn about the limitations and challenges of capitalism in enabling ‘authentic’ conversations around climate action. Students will also learn how to create conversation around climate change by the use of shared values to understand and discover better solutions.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is capitalism and how has it impacted climate action?
  2. Why is it difficult to have open and authentic conversations about climate action?

About the Tool

Tool NameClimate Conversations S2E12: Market Forces and Climate Action
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineCapitalism, Climate Action, Climate Justice, Market Forces
Climate TopicClimate and Society; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolAudio (35 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byClimateX Team
Hosted atClimate Portal
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Audio: Overview of Carbon Pricing

An audio conversation with Christopher Knittel, MIT, about carbon pricing and its impact on individual lifestyle. This audio podcast looks at the complexities of carbon pricing, its type, approximate individual cost and public policy around it.

Students will learn about the basics of carbon pricing and be introduced to carbon tax, cap and trade, and how and what such a tax will be used for. They will learn what carbon tax would mean for an individual consumer and what incentives can be used to create lifestyle changes towards a more sustainable consumption. Additionally, students will also look at the alternatives to carbon pricing.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. What are the common policies associated with carbon pricing?
  3. How does carbon tax affect individual consumption?
  4. How should the government use the carbon taxes? 

About the Tool

Tool NameE7: TIL about carbon pricing
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Cap and Trade, Public Policy
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolAudio (11 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byTILclimate Podcast
Hosted atClimate Portal
Linkhttps://climate.mit.edu/podcasts/e7-til-about-carbon-pricing
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Social Cost of Carbon

A reading titled ‘The Social Cost of Carbon and the Shadow Price of Carbon’ by Richard Price, Simeon Thornton and Stephen Nelson  Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), London, that discusses the topics of social cost of carbon (SCC) and shadow pricing of carbon (SPC) when formulating appraisals and climate change policies. This resource uses the United Kingdom (UK) as the area of study but can also be used for other regions. The reading introduces the concepts of shadow prices and market prices and explains the link between them. It includes discussions  on the benefits of calculating both the SCC and the SPC to reflect the overall cost of greenhouse gas emissions to determine a well-informed stabilisation goal. It further includes discussions to understand the importance of climate informed policies in the economic assessment of a country.

Students will learn about the social cost of carbon and the shadow price of carbon. They will learn how to  compare the marginal abatement costs and social costs of carbon for different stabilization goals as determined by the Stern Review. Students will further learn the application of the SCC and the SPC when determining cost-effectiveness of resources, the concepts of discounting and discount rates for calculating carbon prices

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Carbon pricing is used as an instrument for making climate policies. Explain.
  2. What is the difference between market prices and shadow prices?
  3. What is the importance of shadow pricing in evaluating the costs of greenhouse gases?

About the tool

Tool NameThe Social Cost of Carbon and the Shadow Price of Carbon: what they are, and how to use them in economic appraisal in the UK 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Social Cost of Carbon, Shadow Price of Carbon, Carbon Pricing, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Market Price, Stabilization Goals, Marginal Abatement Cost, Emissions 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationUnited Kingdom 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRichard Price, Simeon Thornton and Stephen Nelson
Hosted atMunich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA)
Linkhttps://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/74976/1/MPRA_paper_74976.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline 
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video Lecture: Radiation Laws

A video lecture titled, ‘Atmospheric radiation – Radiation laws’ from the e-learning course, ‘Introduction to Atmospheric Science’ developed by C Balaji, IIT Madras, for National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL), India. This video lecture includes discussions on various aspects of radiation, atmospheric radiation and the radiation laws. 

Students will be introduced to radiation, radiation laws and the concept of blackbodies. They will further learn about Earth’s energy balance and how to calculate surface temperatures using the Stefan-Boltzmann law. They will also learn about Wien’s displacement law, and Planck’s distribution. 

A transcript of the lecture is also provided.

  1. Define ‘blackbody’. 
  2. What are the features of ‘Planck’s distribution’?
  3. How can Stefan – Boltzmann law be used to calculate the surface temperature of planet earth?

About the tool

Tool NameAtmospheric radiation – Radiation laws
DisciplinePhysics, Earth Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineRadiation, Blackbody, Atmospheric Radiation, Stefan-Boltzmann Law, Wien’s Displacement Law, Planck’s Distribution
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere
Type of tool Video Lecture (47 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byC Balaji, IIT Madras
Hosted atNPTEL (https://nptel.ac.in/courses/119/106/119106008/)
Linkhttps://youtu.be/rHLDHaCcdDw
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video : Behavioral psychology and climate change

A video lecture that discusses behavioural psychological responses to climate change. It focuses on individual lifestyle decisions which are influenced by capitalism, technology advancement, politics, social perceptions and personal gain and benefit; and how this further affects their behavioural responses to climate change.     

Students will learn about behaviourism, consumerism and climate change. They will understand aspects of classical conditioning and behaviourism such as optimisation and rationalization and their importance in individual decision making. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss behavioural psychological responses to climate change
  2. Discuss the link between individual decision making and the seven barriers of sustainability
  3. How does classical conditioning affect individual decision making with regards to climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change: Action and Inaction
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Classical Conditioning, Optimisation, Rationalisation
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video lecture
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Dr Robert Gifford
Hosted at The Institute of International and European Affairs
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Human behaviour and climate change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 2

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains predictions on mortality, ecosystems and income levels. This reading includes results of their modelling that states that climate change will cause an average of 5% reduction in the global per capita consumption over the next 2 centuries, with an addition of 145 – 220 million people falling below poverty line in South Asian and sub-Saharan Africa by 2100, and an expected increase in child mortality to 165,000 – 250,000 children per year.  The reading is subdivided into four chapters, as follows:

  1. How climate change will affect people around the world: This chapter draws correlations between climate change and potential implications for access to food, water stress, health and well-being, land and the environment. It gives a detailed analysis of global warming implications from 1ºC rise up to temperature change of 5ºC and above. [pp 55 – 91 (as per table of contents) or pp 100 – 136 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Implications of climate change for development: This chapter looks at developing countries and their vulnerability to climate change due to their dependence on climate sensitive sectors such as agriculture. Apart from food insecurity and damage to the healthcare systems, there will be mass migrations and conflict which will hamper growth and development. [pp 92 – 121 (as per table of contents) or pp 137 – 166 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Costs of climate change in developed countries: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate change on the developed countries and explains how for moderate amounts of warming some higher latitude countries will face short-term benefits due to rise in agriculture yields, lower winter mortality, lower heating requirements and possible boosts in tourism. However, they will face disastrous impacts due to climate shocks at higher temperatures. [pp 122 – 142 (as per table of contents) or pp 167 – 187 (as per scrolling)]
  4. Economic modelling of climate change impacts: This chapter details the modelling work conducted for estimating the monetary impact of climate change by using an Integrated Assessment Model with a temperature rise of 2-3ºC as the starting point. [pp 143 – 167 (as per table of contents) or pp 188 – 212 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how melting glaciers, crop yield decline, ocean acidification, displacement, malnutrition, rising sea levels and species extinction will impact the global economy through empirical analysis. They will also learn what makes developing countries most vulnerable to climate change. They will understand how certain adverse effects of climate change are already underway and early mitigation may be the only way to control the impacts. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How will a 2ºC temperature rise scenario differ from a 4ºC temperature rise scenario?
  2. Discuss climate vulnerabilities of:
    1. Developed Countries
    2. Developing Countries
  3. Define and explain the ‘Mendelsohn’ model, the ‘Tol’ model, and the ‘Nordhaus’ model.

About the Tool

Tool NamePart II: The Impacts of climate change on growth and development from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Econometrics, Integrated Assessment Model, Per Capita Consumption, GDP, Economic Growth
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 55 to 167 ) –  as per table of content; (pp 100 – 212) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 3

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains discussions on the need to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the subsequents cost of doing the same. The reading is subdivided into seven chapters, as follows:

  1. Projecting the growth of greenhouse gas emissions: This chapter discusses the past drivers of global emissions growth and a future prediction with ‘business-as-usual’ scenario in case of climate policy inaction.  [pp 169 – 192 (as per table of contents) or pp 214- 237 (as per scrolling)]
  2. The challenge of stabilisation: This chapter details steps that can be taken to stabilise GHG emissions and the cost of delay. [pp 193 – 210 (as per table of contents) or pp 238 – 255 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Identifying the costs of mitigation: This chapter looks at how mitigation costs are identified for various methods to reduce GHG emissions, who will pay for them, and what will be the long-term impacts of GHG cost-cutting. [pp 211 – 238 (as per table of contents) or pp 256 – 283(as per scrolling)]
  4. Macroeconomic models of costs: This chapter goes into the modelling approaches to calculate costs, the factors that may impact these costs, and how GHG emission cost-cutting might affect GDP. [pp 239 – 252 (as per table of contents) or pp 284 – 297 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Structural change and competitiveness: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate-change policies about market structure, trade, location and industrial emissions on market competitiveness.  [pp 253 – 268 (as per table of contents) or pp 298 – 313(as per scrolling)]
  6. Opportunities and wider benefits from climate policies: This chapter looks at the benefits and opportunities of climate change action for various industries and services and how it will impact the overall financial market.  [pp 269 -283 (as per table of contents) or pp 314 – 328 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Towards a goal for climate change policy: This chapter looks at cost-benefit analysis and climate change policy in the long run with a focus on fast changes to avoid adverse risks.  [pp 284 – 307 (as per table of contents) or pp 329 – 352(as per scrolling)]

Students will learn the cause of the rise in greenhouse gas emissions and how, due to advancement in energy technology, income growth is no longer solely dependent on emission growth. They will also learn that the benefits of climate change policies for markets and industries outweigh its costs in the long-run. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What will happen if we continue with the ‘business-as-usual’ scenario of greenhouse gas emissions?
  2. State cost-effective methods and techniques to reduce greenhouse gas emission.
  3. How does The Review calculate marginal costs and marginal benefits of climate change policy?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart III: The economics of stabilisation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Integrated Assessment Model, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 168 to 307) –  as per table of content; (pp 213 – 352) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: The Maya Civilization and Climate Change

A video lecture titled ‘The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale’ by B.L Turner II, Arizona State University, on the archaeology and geography of climate change during the Maya Civilization. The lecture discusses the depopulation and decline of the ancient civilization, during the tenth and eleventh centuries, potentially due to climate change. It includes discussions on the “millennial long wave” of population growth and decline that indicates the flourishing of a civilization and its subsequent decline. Turner further discusses the dependence of the Maya people on the land and how climate change could have led to environmental degradation and agrarian collapse. Through the use of geographic and climate data, the lecture draws a timeline for the rise and collapse of the Maya civilization, changes in societal structures and functioning, and efforts to adapt to environmental and climate change.

Students will learn about how climate changes could have contributed to the decline of the Maya civilization. They will also learn about the relationship of people, land and the environment and the rise and fall of their societal and economic structures. Additionally, they will learn about concepts like “environmental determinism”. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss whether climate change contributed to the decline of the Maya civilization.
  2. Discuss the term “environmental determinism”
  3. Discuss the archaeology and geography of climate change during the Maya civilization.

About the tool

Tool NameThe Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineArchaeology, History, Maya Civilization, Environmental Determinism, Agrarian, Land use Land cover, 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video (50 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard Museums of Science & Culture 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Audio: Climate Psychotherapy

An audio conversation between Caroline Hickman and Tree Staunton, hosted by the Climate Psychology Alliance, about the need for climate and environmental awareness in psychotherapy. 

This tool can be used to teach your students about ‘Eco-anxiety and ‘Eco-empathy in the therapy room. Additionally, students will learn about crisis work, negative capability, and resonance in psychotherapy. Students will also understand how climate-aware therapy can tackle climate emergencies through shared concern such as loss, despair, grief  and a sense of abandonment.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Why has climate change become a prevalent discussion in psychotherapy?
  2. How can a therapist become  climate-aware?
  3. What is eco-anxiety and how is it impacting individuals who come in for psychotherapy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Talking Climate Change in Therapy Room
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Psychotherapy, Climate-aware therapy, Eco-anxiety, Eco-empathy, Climate Vulnerability, Grief, Loss, Despair
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of Tool Audio (44 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate (Senior Level), Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation None
Developed by Climate Psychology Alliance: Caroline Hickman and Tree Staunton
Hosted at Climate Psychology Alliance: Difficult Truths
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Climate change, mental health and well-being

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Coping with Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Climate Risk and Megacities

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on the impacts of climate change on large urban cities.The reading describes risks and direct and indirect impacts of climate change on the security of urban cities specifically coastal megacities.

Students will understand the impacts of climate change on urban megacities including large coastal agglomerates. They will also learn about the fragility and resilience of cities vulnerable to security risks caused by climate change.They will further understand related security, environmental, human rights and governance issues and policies.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact urban coastal cities? 
  2. How does climate change cause human migration and displacement? Give examples.
  3. Does migration to megacities create instability and conflict? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameCoastal Megacities vs. The Sea: Climate and Security in Urban Spaces
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineUrban Environment, Development Studies, Urbanization, Human Migration, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJanani Vivekananda and Neil Bhatiya in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/7_coastal-megacities.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic