Reading: Gender Dimensions of Human Health and Climate Change

A reading by the World Health Organization titled ‘Gender, Climate Change and Health’ that discusses the gender dimensions of human health and climate change. Using specific climatic events such as heatwaves and flooding, the reading discusses some direct and indirect health issues that impact men and women differently. It further discusses issues such as domestic violence and nutrition deficiency and links with climate change. The reading also discusses the increased vulnerability of women to climate risks and hence the need for gender analysis in policy making. The reading also includes discussions on gender-sensitive approaches and gender-responsive interventions to increase health equity and ensure effective climate mitigation and adaptation. The reading is divided into five subtopics: 

  1. A background of gender, health and climate change 
  2. Impacts: Health 
  3. Impacts: social and human consequences of climate change 
  4. Responses to climate change 
  5. Conclusion, gaps in understanding and issues for urgent action 

Students will learn about gender and health inequity to climate change impacts. They will also learn about health risks of climate change to women, the social and human consequences of climate change, and the need to formulate gender-sensitive climate change policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does climate change impact women’s health? 
  2. What are some social consequences of climate change? 
  3. Discuss the need for gender sensitive and inclusive climate policies.

About the tool

Tool NameGender, Climate Change and Health 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Women Studies, Human Health, Domestic Violence
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byWorld Health Organization
Hosted atWorld Health Organization Website
Linkhttps://www.who.int/globalchange/GenderClimateChangeHealthfinal.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video Micro-lecture: Oceans, Ocean Circulation and Sea Surface Temperatures

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland that introduces basic concepts in oceanography. This video lecture is part of a MOOC titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn basic concepts of oceanography such as trade winds, atmospheric pressure, Thermohaline circulation (THC), Walker circulation, upwelling and downwelling, Coriolis effect, and gyres amongst others. Through the use of ocean cycles and models, students will be able to chart the changes in surface temperature patterns and relate that to carbon dioxide and methane concentrations over time.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of the oceans and ocean circulation with respect to the climate of the Earth.
  2. Why is the rate of change in sea surface temperature different for the Antarctic ocean when compared to other oceans?

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L03 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 03
DisciplineEarth Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineOceanography, Ocean Circulation, Currents, Sea Surface Temperature, Thermohaline Circulation, Coriolis, Trade Winds
Climate TopicClimate and the Hydrosphere; Climate and Atmosphere,  Climate Variability Record; Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Type of toolVideo (44 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NCR) at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER)
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Biodiversity, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions of climate change with relation to biodiversity and ecosystems. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the traditional role of women as household managers, how they tend to use natural resources in the house, traditional knowledge systems and current gender gaps in the sector. 

Students will be introduced to the role of women in household related natural resource use and decision making. They will learn the importance of women’s knowledge of local biodiversity and their efforts in conservation and natural resource management. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change in biodiversity and natural resource management.
  2. Discuss gender inequality in terms of needs, knowledge and behaviour in biodiversity conservation.
  3. Discuss the term “biopiracy”.
  4. Discuss the current state of women representation in biodiversity, conservation and natural resource management.

About the tool 

Tool NameBiodiversity, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Gender and Biodiversity, Biodiversity, Conservation, Natural Resource Management
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/biodiversity.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video Micro-lecture: Climate Change and Human Evolution

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the impacts of climate change on human evolution and early civilizations. This video lecture is part 1 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn how climate change possibly impacted speciation, bipedalism, evolution of brain size, cultural evolution and the appearance and disappearance of certain ancient civilizations. They will also learn about the impact of various glacial and interglacial periods, East-African aridification, and changes in sea surface temperature and rainfall on human evolution and history during the Pleistocene. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How has climate change potentially impacted our evolution from apes to Homo sapiens?
  2. Explain the relationship between plate tectonics, El Nino patterns and human evolution.
  3. Discuss examples of species extinction by early human in Africa and Australia. 

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L01 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 01
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Evolution, Anthropology, Human History, Early Civilizations, Bipedalism,  East-African Aridification
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere, Climate and Biosphere, Climate Variability Record
Type of toolVideo (42 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Ancient Civilizations and Climate Change

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the historic record of human activity from the start of the Holocene period, 11,000 years ago, to the Little Ice Age. This video lecture is part 2 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn about the impact of human activities on Earth’s climate throughout human history. They will also learn how ancient civilizations such as the Indus Valley civilization, the Vikings, Nile River civilizations, the Mayans and the European civilizations expanded during the Holocene optimum. They will further understand the decline of these civilizations during the last glacial maximum. In addition, students will also learn about the Little Ice Age, colonisation, war and disease.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the Holocene optimum? What were its impacts on the Vikings?
  2. What are ‘Natural Forcings’ and how did it cause the Little Ice Age?
  3. How is the Manchu conquest of China related to the Little Ice Age?

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L02 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 02
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineAnthropology, History, Ancient Civilizations, Indus Valley civilization, Vikings, Nile River civilizations, Mayan civilization, European civilizations, Holocene, Little Ice Age, Last Glacial Maximum
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere; Climate Variability Record; Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms; Climate and Society
Type of toolVideo (40 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER)
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Historical Climatology- The Roman Empire

A video by Michael McCormick, Harvard University that discusses the link between science, history and climate change. The lecture discusses the history of Rome and Medieval Europe through the use of archaeological tools, genetics and computer science. It highlights some drastic climatic events that led to changes within the Roman Empire. Additionally, the lecture discusses the challenges that medieval societies faced in understanding, responding to, adapting to and mitigating environmental events. 

Students will learn the role of Historical Studies in understanding impacts of climate change on the Roman Empire and Medieval Europe. They will also learn about the techniques developed and used by historians and climate scientists to study historical climate from a thousand years ago. Additionally, students will learn about the major historical climate crises.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is historical climatology?
  2. Discuss the 4 phases of the climate during the Roman Empire
  3. How does history inform current climate  action?

About the tool

Tool NameConnecting Roman and Medieval Climate and Historical Change
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Historical Climatology, Archaeology, Anthropology, Roman Empire, Medieval Europe
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Lecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0PWjxs-wXI
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Climate Change and Mountain Gorillas of Central Africa

A case study titled ‘Mountain gorillas in the Virunga mountains face new threats as their habitat changes’ from ‘Wildlife in a Changing Climate’. This case study describes threats to mountain gorillas that live in the Virunga Volcanoes Conservation Area of Central Africa due to climate-change induced shifts in vegetation. It also describes a brief history of conservation efforts of mountain gorillas as well as the current threats to their habitat.

Students will learn about how climate change is affecting the habitat of endemic flora and fauna in the reserve. They will also learn about mountain gorilla conservation in the midst of civil war, habitat degradation, and poaching.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the threats that the mountain gorillas of Central Africa face due to climate change?
  2. Briefly discuss how the mountain gorilla of Central Africa is a conservation success story.

About the Tool 

Tool Name Box 5: Mountain gorillas in the Virunga mountains face new threats as their habitat changes from Wildlife in a changing climate
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Biodiversity, Biogeography, Conservation, Vegetation Shift, Mountain Gorilla, Habitat
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Africa, Uganda
Language English
Translation
Developed by Tetra Tech ARD U.S.
Hosted at Climatelinks of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Marxism and Carbon Markets

A reading titled ‘Greening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets’ by Steffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog that discusses a Marxist assessment of carbon markets and their role in the evolution of global capitalism and climate change. The reading discusses four major marxist concepts: metabolic rift, capitalism and world ecology, uneven development and accumulation through dispossession, sub-imperialism, to establish a structure for an analysis of carbon markets. The reading further discusses the importance of understanding historical global capitalism development and its link to nature, especially within the Global South. 

Students will learn about Marx’s theories and carbon markets and their role in mitigating climate change. They will also learn about the concept of ‘greening capitalism’ and its role in the future of economic growth and development. Students will further learn about the importance of mapping and acknowledging historical global capitalism development to understand the current state of climate change in the Global South. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Greening Capitalism? 
  2. Explain the link between history, capitalism and nature in the Global South
  3. Carbon markets could affect capitalist dynamics to achieve a global sustainable economy. Discuss 

About the tool

Tool NameGreening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Greening Capitalism, Historical Materialism, Economic Policy, Marxism
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySteffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog
Hosted atResearch Gate
Linkhttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/239735675_Greening_Capitalism_A_Marxist_Critique_of_Carbon_Markets
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video: India’s Climate Change Policies

A video lecture on India’s climate change policies and governance by Navroz Dubash, Center for Policy Research.  This video lecture is part 2 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.  The video discusses the history of India’s climate change policy. It also includes discussions on public narrative and policy frameworks through two main themes:

  1. India’s changing climate narrative: This section focuses on the history of India’s climate change policy and the change in public climate change narrative. The section discusses climate equity, 
  2. Emerging climate policy framework: This section discusses the current policy framework and stakeholders in mitigating climate change 

The lecture discusses specific climate change impacts such as decreased agricultural yields, increased rainfall, melting of glaciers and water scarcity that directly affect the economic development of India. Dubash explains India’s growing energy needs and the potential threat that climate change may have on the development of the energy sector. Additionally, the lecture discusses India’s current carbon emitting position with regards to other countries such as the U.S.A and China, creating an upper limit of emissions. The lecture also discusses the potential synergy of development and climate mitigation through the concept of “ urban co-benefits” where sectors like transport can develop to include mitigation techniques. Dubash also discusses the current institutional landscape for climate governance that starts with governing bodies such as the Ministry of Environment and Forest in 2007 and continues with the National Action Plan in 2009. Lastly, the lecture discusses the three pledges that India, as part of the Paris Agreement, has undertaken to carry out: 

  1. Decrease emission intensity by 33-35% by 2030
  2. To convert from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources by 2030
  3. Sequester 2.5-3.0 billion tons of carbon dioxide in the forest sector by 2030

Students will learn about the history of India’s climate change policies. They will also learn about the climate change narratives in India and how it has been influenced by inequity, social  impacts such as poverty and water scarcity and geopolitical drivers such as foreign policy, country alliances and global economic development. Students will further learn about the institutions and local governing bodies that influence climate change policy making. They will further learn about India’s current position within global climate mitigation initiatives and the competition of development within countries.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the history of India’s climate change policies.
  2. Discuss the change of climate change narratives in India over the last 20 years.
  3. How does the debate between development and climate change mitigation influence climate change policy making?

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO8 LO2 Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Public Policy
Topic(s) in DisciplinePublic Policy, Climate Change Policy, Governance, India Climate Change Policy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video (36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationAsia, India 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Impacts of Climate Change on Biodiversity in Uganda

A reading from the report of the USAID titled ‘Climate Change and Biodiversity in Uganda’ that describes the effect of climatic and non-climatic stressors on its biodiversity and ecosystem goods and services. This reading describes expected changes in flora and fauna, increase in frequency and severity of floods and forest fires in specific regions of Uganda due to climate change. This reading is from chapters 2.2 (Climate Change and Potential Impacts on Biodiversity) and 2.3 ( Non- Climate Stressors on Biodiversity & Ecosystem Goods & Services) of the report.

Students will learn about how an increase in temperature can affect the hydrological cycle, change the distribution of flora and fauna, lead to decrease in availability of ecosystem resources, cause colonization by invasive species, trigger human wildlife conflicts, cause natural disasters and disease outbreaks, and affect the livelihoods of people in Uganda.  They will also learn about how climatic and non-climatic stressors potentially alter ecosystems.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change can affect biodiversity in Uganda. 
  2. List how climatic stressors affect ecosystem goods and services.
  3. How do climatic stressors affect non-climatic stressors?
  4. Discuss how climate change and loss of biodiversity can lead to increased human-wildlife conflict?
  5. How will climate change affect the livelihoods of people in Uganda?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Climate Change and Biodiversity in Uganda
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Biodiversity, Ecosystem, Ecological Stressors, Ecosystem Goods and Services, Habitat, Habitat Loss
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Africa, Uganda
Language English
Translation
Developed by Tetra Tech ARD U.S.
Hosted at Climatelinks of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic