Video/ Microlecture: Global Warming – A Negative Externality

A short video by Hoesung Lee, Korea University and vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on carbon pricing and climate change. The video discusses the importance of putting a price on carbon emissions and related activities since climate change is an example of a global externality. Lee further explains the linkages of the environment with

 economic growth and development. 

Students will learn the concept of global warming as a negative externality. They will also understand the importance of putting a price on carbon emissions to reduce global warming and the need for global cooperation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are negative externalities in economics?
  2. What are the negative externalities associated with climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameHoesung Lee on carbon pricing
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineExternality, Negative Externality, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Environmental Protection
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (2 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCarbon Brief
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Wm8-eYdMm0
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Human Migration and Displacement

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on human migration and displacement caused by climate change. It describes the impacts of climate change on voluntary and forced human migration and displacement through examples from South Asia, the Middle East and western China.

Students will learn about the key drivers and impacts of climate change that influence migration and displacement. They will also understand the role of climate change in increasing the likelihood of regional conflict. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect migration and displacement?
  2. What are the reasons behind involuntary and voluntary migration and displacement?
  3. What are the four drivers of migration that result from climate change?
  4. What role does climate change play in the likelihood of regional conflict?

About the Tool 

Tool NameMigration and Displacement in a Changing Climate
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Migration, Displacement, Conflict, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal, South Asia, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, China 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRobert McLeman in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/12_migration-and-displacement.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change Poetry

A set of poems commissioned by the Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) that feature 9 poems on the theme of climate change. The poems are based on the collective understanding of climate change and human response to this global phenomenon. These pieces were commissioned as part of ‘Seven Dimensions of Climate Change’ series of the RSA and include the following poems

  1. ‘A Climate of Change’ by George the Poet 
  2. ‘How’s My Coal’ by Simon Barraclough
  3. ‘Except for the Lone Wave’ by Grace Nichols 
  4. ‘Untitled’ by Tom Chivers 
  5. ‘We Have Everything We Need’ by Selena Nwulu
  6. ‘Water is Company’ by Ruth Padel 
  7. ‘Polar Heart’ by Simon Barraclough
  8. ‘Inheritance’ by John Agard 
  9. ‘Alongside Beans’ by Alice Oswald 

Students will learn about climate change and its impacts on society through poetry. They will also learn about linkages of  science and human emotion. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is climate poetry?
  2. How can poetry be used to tackle the issue of climate change?
  3. What are the essential components of poetry? 

About the tool: 

Tool Name9 Original Poems on Climate Change
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry, Literature
Climate Topic Climate and Society  
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) 
Hosted atThe Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA)  
Linkhttps://www.thersa.org/globalassets/pdfs/events/climate-change-poetry-anthology.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Food Insecurity in Somalia

A video titled ‘Locust swarm threatens Somalia food crisis’ by AP Archive that discusses the threat of the recent desert locust outbreak to Somalia’s food and crop production. The video also discusses how the rapid maturing of the desert locust may lead to mass breeding and result in further migration to other regions of Africa. The video highlights the fact that since Somalia may already be vulnerable, the locust outbreak could cause additional stress  and cause food insecurity. 

Students will learn about the link between climate change, changing weather patterns, desert locusts breeding and migration, and food insecurity in Somalia. They will also learn about potential strategies to prevent future outbreaks. Students will further understand the need for international cooperation to tackle the situation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the impact of the desert locusts outbreak on agriculture and food security in Somalia.
  2. How has climate change caused changes  in weather patterns in Somalia? 

About the tool: 

Tool NameLocust swarm threatens Somalia food crisis
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Agricultural Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Agriculture
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture
Type of tool Video (5 mins 15 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Somalia
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAP Archive 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aoclw68b0mM
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Gene Editing in Tomato Plants

A video that describes a new gene editing technology, ‘CRISPR: Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats’, which could be utilized in agricultural production in response to climate change. This video by Zachary Lippman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), highlights his use of CRISPR gene editing in two varieties of tomato plants to make them flower and ripen earlier than usual.

Students will learn briefly about growth cycles in tomato plants, and their tendency to reduce yield when days are longer. They will further understand the use of CRISPR technology in tomato plants and how this approach is useful to obtain faster and higher yields of the tomato crop.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change might impact the growth of the tomato plant.
  2. Discuss the role of CRISPR in agricultural production using the tomato crop as an example. 

About the tool

Tool NameGene editing yields tomatoes that flower and ripen weeks earlier
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGene Editing, CRISPR, Tomato Plant, Cultivation
Climate Topic Climate and Agriculture; Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Video (3 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byZachary Lippman
Hosted atCold Spring Harbor Laboratory on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: GM Crops in Sub-Saharan Africa

A reading by John Agaba, Alliance for Science, Cornell University, that describes the importance of food security in Sub-Saharan Africa, in the face of climate change. This reading includes several examples of genetically modified crops and why they are favoured by farmers in Sub-Saharan African countries.

Students will learn about genetically modified crops and some arguments surrounding their utilization. They will further understand how genetically modified crops could possibly bolster food security in several Sub-Saharan African countries that are dealing with failed crops due to climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Briefly describe Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). 
  2. Why do farmers prefer to plant hybrid or genetically modified crops? List some of the examples.
  3. Discuss the arguments surrounding GM crop utilization in Africa.

About the tool

Tool NameAfrican farmers want GMO seeds to help weather climate change
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGenetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), GMO Crops
Climate Topic Climate and Agriculture; Climate and the Biosphere; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal, Africa
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJohn Agaba
Hosted atAlliance for Science, Cornell University
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Insect Behaviour and Temperature Variation

A short reading from Chapter 1, Lesson 3 of ‘Integrating Climate Change Issues in Southeast Asian Schools; A Teachers’ Guide’ that describes how changes in temperature can affect insect life cycles and populations. This lesson titled  ‘Interesting Insects’ by the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) highlights the implications of increased temperatures on insect behavior.

Students will understand how temperature variations can directly impact insect behavior due to their cold-blooded physiology. They will also learn about the potential increase in populations and life cycles per season of insects or pests.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How do temperature variations affect the physiology of insects? 
  2. Discuss how climate change can affect insect behaviour and populations?   

About the tool

Tool Name‘Interesting Insects’ (Chapter 1, Lesson 3, Pages 42-43: Main Concepts and Skills)
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineAnimal Behavior, Insects, Insect Behavior, Life Cycle, Insect Biodiversity
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)
Hosted atSoutheast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: To Bee or Not To Bee

A video that describes how climate change affects plants and insect pollination. This video by NASA scientist, Wayne Esaias, describes current research on impacts of climate change on pollination cycles of bees using satellite imagery. 

Students will learn that global warming has potentially caused changes in flowering period that may not coincide with bee visitation periods; thus, impacting pollination in flowering plants. They will further understand the interdependence of bees and flowering plants and how climate change may affect their survival.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss, with an example, the plant-pollinator system in the classroom.
  2. How is climate change impacting the pollination of flowers by honey bees? 

About the tool

Tool NameSting of Climate Change
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplinePollination, Fertilization, Flowering, Insect Pollination, Pollinators, Plant-Pollinator Systems
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Video (5 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Middle School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byWayne Esaias
Hosted atNASA Scientific Visualization Studio
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Rap Music and Climate Change

A music album titled ‘The Rap Guide To Climate Chaos’ by Baba Brinkman that contains 24 tracks on climate change. The album discusses the science, politics and economics of climate change. The tracks cover a variety of topics such as greenhouse gases, carbon emissions, climate taxes and green capitalism.  

Tracks include – Options, I.P.C.C., Keep It Positive, Greenhouse (feat. Aaron Nazrul), Party Don’t Stop, Run the Joules, Mo Carbon Mo Problems, What’s Beef (feat. Bill Nye), Battle Lines, Lost in the Numbers, Bright Side, Fossil Fuel Ballers (feat. Aaron Nazrul), Exxon Knew, Laudato Si, Yank the Plug, Make It Hot, Regulators, Carbon Bubble (feat. Mariella), Stranded Assets, Ride Electric (feat. Fand), This or That, Freedom Ain’t Free, Stand Up, Makin’ Waves (feat. Gaia’s Eye) 

In songs such as ‘IPCC’, Brinkman addresses the findings of the committee and even internal disagreements on projections. On songs such as ‘Greenhouse’, he takes the listener through a sonic journey of development including the greenhouse effect, predicted rise in global temperatures from Svante’s study and puts them alongside the findings of the IPCC and its accuracy. He critiques his own consumption and the paradox of being unable to individually contribute to reducing the impact of climate change without large scale policy reforms. Brinkman speaks extensively about cap and trade vs climate taxes, and the ecological debt that richer countries owe the marginalized. The album also focuses on Exxon’s failures and lies.

The album can be found at https://music.bababrinkman.com/album/the-rap-guide-to-climate-chaos

Note that the album is available for purchase at the link above.

The tracks are available for free viewing on YouTube as part of Baba Brinkman’s performance for ‘Talks At Google’. This free resource can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1ZH6R3Idb4&t=759s

Students will learn about the topic of climate change through music and learn about its current impacts.  They will also learn about the important stakeholders in climate change politics and how climate change politics plays a huge role in the development of the global economy. Students will further learn about how music can be used to discuss science based topics in order to better understand them.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate change? Discuss the various perceptions of climate change 
  2. Discuss climate change topics and the politics underlying the problem
  3. What is the role of fossil fuel burning in the warming of the planet?
  4. What is green capitalism?

About the tool

Tool NameThe Rap Guide To Climate Chaos
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change, Music, Rap, Hip-Hop 
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change, Climate and the Anthrosphere, Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Audio (60 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byBaba Brinkman
Hosted atBaba Brinkman Music/ Talks at Google 
LinkAlbum Link or Youtube Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Teaching Module: Poetry Writing

A classroom activity designed by the Poetry Society, UK that demonstrates techniques to write climate change poetry. This module provides a step by step guide in poetry writing. It uses Amanda Dalton’s poem ‘How to Disappear’ to draw on the theme of ‘disappearance’ which the reader can interpret on both personal levels as well as for the planet impacted by global warming. 

Students will learn techniques of poetry writing, specifically climate change poetry. They will also learn to narrate their emotions and perceptions about climate change through poetry.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the essential components of poetry?
  2. What are some things that may disappear from the Earth due to global warming?
  3. Discuss an idea for a climate change related poem.

About the Tool 

Tool NameVanishing Acts: Connecting Climate Change and Poetry 
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHelen Mort
Hosted atThe Poetry Society, UK
Linkhttps://poetryclass.poetrysociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Vanishing-Acts-Poetry-and-Climate-Change-Helen-Mort-2.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Climate Change Poems read by Celebrities

An audio resource that contains 21 poems on climate change. Compiled by UK poet laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, the resource provides audio files on themes of climate change by renowned poets, narrated by celebrities. The resource includes the following poems read by different celebrities:

  1. James Franco reads ‘Causeway’ by Matthew Hollis
  2. Jeremy Irons reads ‘Storm’ by Michael Longley 
  3. Ruth Wilson reads ‘Vertigo’ by Alice Oswald 
  4. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘Zoological Positivism Blues’ by Paul Muldoon 
  5. Michael Sheen reads ‘Scratching for Metaphor in the Somerset Coalfields’ by Sean Borodale
  6. Kelly Macdonald reads ‘Extinction’ by Jackie Kay 
  7. Maxine Peake reads ‘A Mancunian Taxi-driver Foresees His Death’ by Michael Symmons Roberts 
  8. Tamsin Greig reads ‘Last Snowman’ by Simon Armitage
  9. Iain Glen reads ‘Nostalgia’ by Don Paterson
  10. Iwan Rheon reads ‘Cantre’r Gwaelod*’ by Gillian Clarke 
  11. James Franco reads ‘Still like with Sea Pinks and High Tide’ by Maura Dooley
  12. Jeremy Irons reads ‘Turbines in January’ by Colette Bryce
  13. Ruth Wilson reads ‘Silent Sea’ by Rachael Boast
  14. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘The Solace of Artemis’ by Paula Meehan
  15. Michael Sheen reads ‘The Rhinoceros’ by Robert Minhinnick 
  16. Kelly Macdonald reads ‘X’ by Imtiaz Dharkar
  17. Maxine Peake reads ‘Doggerland’ by Jo Bell  
  18. Tamsin Greig reads ‘A Language of Change’ by David Sergeant
  19. Iain Glen reads ‘California Dreaming’ by Lachlan McKinnon
  20. Gabriel Byrne reads ‘Late Sentinels’ by Peter Fallon 
  21. James Franco reads ‘I was Born into a World’ by James Franco 

Both audio mp3 and text versions of the poems are available on the website

Students will learn about climate change through the use of poetry. They will also understand the techniques involved in writing and analysing poetry.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How is climate change portrayed in modern poetry?
  2. How do you analyse a poem? 

About the Tool 

Tool Name‘Our melting, shifting liquid world’: celebrities read poems on climate change
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePoetry, Literature 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading, Audio
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCarol Ann Duffy
Hosted atThe Guardian
LinkAudio Link
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: A Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi) Syllabus

An article published by Yale Climate Connections on resources for teaching climate fiction. The article features Elizabeth Rush, a climate fiction educator at Brown University, who discusses the ways in which climate fiction can create a relationship between humans, their environment and technology. The article provides educators a list of climate fiction novels and short stories. Cli-Fi resources reviewed in the article include ‘The Tamarisk Hunter’ by Paolo Bacigalupi, ‘Gold, Fame, Citrus’ by Claire Vaye Watkins, ‘Monstro’ by Junot Díaz, ‘New York 2140’ by Kim Stanley Robinson, and ‘10:04’ by Ben Lerner.

Through the Cli-Fi books listed, students will learn about climate change and the importance of Cli-Fi. 

Use this tool and the resources listed therein to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate fiction link society, climate change and technology?
  2. How can cli-fi provide solutions to mitigate climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameWhat’s on your climate fiction syllabus?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale Climate Connections with Elizabeth Rush, Brown University 
Hosted atYale Climate Connections
Linkhttps://yaleclimateconnections.org/2018/04/whats-on-your-climate-fiction-syllabus/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Can Cli-Fi Save The Planet?

A short article by Dan Bloom in The Medium about potential ways in which climate fiction (Cli-Fi) is now helping students engage with climate change and can provide potential solutions to the crisis. In this short article, Bloom, who is thought to have coined the term ‘Cli-Fi’ discusses the increase in climate fiction in the fields of education, writing, and media across the world. 

Students will learn about Cli-Fi, and how it is helping with youth engagement in the current climate crisis. Students will further understand the importance of popular media in youth involvement for the climate movement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How can Cli-Fi impact the climate movement?
  2. Why is it important to include Cli-Fi in today’s classrooms?

About the Tool 

Tool NameCan “Cli-Fi” Help Keep Our Planet Livable?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature, Education  
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDan Bloom
Hosted atThe Medium
LinkGo To Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: ‘The Great Derangement’: A conversation

A short discussion led by Dr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India on Amitav Ghosh’s book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’, that summarizes key points of Ghosh’s work.This video includes discussions on topics such as

  1. Why is climate change ‘unimaginable’ or ‘unthinkable’?
  2. Why does the missing narrative of climate change require the unmasking of ‘unbelievable choices’ we have made in the past?
  3. How did the rift in narrative between the human and the non-human come about? 
  4. How has the association of nature and culture evolved historically?
  5. How does Western individualism as opposed to non-Western collective values affect climate action?
  6. Why is there a need for a more philosophical approach with the contextualization of history to deal with global climate change?

Students will learn about the complex narrative of climate change and the challenges it poses to fiction. They will also learn about how non-fiction caters to a specific demographic and, therefore, the need to include climate change in fictional works to reach a wider audience. Students will also learn about the importance of using ‘realism’ as opposed to ‘surrealism’ as a way of communicating this global crisis. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why have climate change topics been underrepresented in fiction writing?
  2. What does Amitav Ghosh mean by ‘The Great Derangement’?
  3. How does the evolution of historical narratives influence contemporary narratives on climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Conversation on Amitav Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, History, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (19 min 30 sec)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr Maya Dodd with Paloma Chandrachud, FLAME University, India. Produced for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU platform
Linkhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1zF2VIWoF5_yJs_zzw5XLc42TskGhImu8/view
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 1

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains a compilation of the scientific evidence of human caused climate change, its analysis through economic theory, and discussion on possible alternatives for development. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. The Science of Climate Change: This chapter provides scientific evidence to link the increase in greenhouse gases to climate change along with its impact at the regional and global level. [pp 1 – 22 (as per table of contents) or pp 46 – 67 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Economics, Ethics and Climate Change: This chapter discusses the externalities and the cost-benefit analysis of climate change. It focuses on the risks and uncertainty it may pose to free markets, economic policies, welfare, equity, justice, freedoms and rights. [pp 23 – 40 (as per table of contents) or pp 68 – 85 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Ethical Frameworks and Intertemporal Equity:​​ This chapter looks at the relevance of some technical frameworks such as – intertemporal appraisal, cost-benefit analysis, and discounting, in tackling various challenges posed by climate change. [pp 41 – 54 (as per table of contents) or pp 86 – 99 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how to analyse climate change through the lens of economics. They will also learn about the economic activities that have contributed most to greenhouse gas emissions and the possible policy challenges that may arise from it.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does an increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases cause global warming?
  2. State some of the economic risks and uncertainties caused due to a rise in greenhouse gas emissions?
  3. What is discounting? How is this method used to calculate the economic risks in the Stern Review?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart I: Climate Change: Our Approach from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Economic Risk, Economic Policy, Cost-Benefit analysis, Discounting, Uncertainty
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolReading (pp 1 to 54 ) –  as per table of contents; (pp 46 – 99) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Mental Health Risks of Climate Change

An audio lecture from the ‘Climate Change and Health’ audio series by Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, that discusses how climate change and environmental change will impact physical and mental health and well-being. The audio also discusses the connections between mental, physical and community health. 

Students will learn about cognitive, psychological and behavioural disorders caused by climate change. They will also learn about the current and future impacts of climate change on mental well being and the urgent need to address it. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change affects aspects of mental health. 
  2. How is community health impacted by climate change? Discuss in the classroom 
  3. What are some direct and indirect mental health impacts of natural disasters caused by climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change and Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Community Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health, Climate and Society
Type of tool Audio (10 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHarvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Locust Plague of East Africa

An article titled ‘A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame’ by Madeleine Stone in the National Geographic that discusses the relationship between the 2019-20 desert locust swarms in East Africa and climate change. The article focuses on how rising sea surface temperatures, storms and cyclones, changing ocean circulation patterns caused by human activity may have triggered this trans-oceanic disaster and destruction of food supply. 

Students will learn about how climate change triggered the mass migration of the desert locusts over East Africa. They will also learn about the unseasonal cyclones and storms that led to unusual locust breeding that resulted in the widespread destruction of crops and disrupted the food chain in East Africa. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are desert locusts?
  2. Is climate change responsible for the current locust outbreak in East Africa? Discuss.
  3. How is the locust plague causing food insecurity in some countries?

About the tool: 

Tool NameA plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Species Migration, Agriculture 
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture 
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byMadeleine Stone
Hosted atNational Geographic
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Did Drought cause the Syrian Civil War?

A short video from the Yale Climate Communications series titled ‘Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change’ on climate change as a catalyst for crises. The video discusses how climate change potentially contributed to the drought in Syria causing large scale human migration, poverty, political instability and, possibly, the civil war.  

Students will learn about how global warming and rising temperatures has an effect on the natural resources of a state. They will also learn about various factors that could have caused the civil war in Syria such as large-scale migration from farmland to urban areas and the subsequent collapse of the state. Students will further learn about the implications of the civil war on global geopolitical alliances and global security. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change may have caused the drought in Syria from 2007-2010.
  2. Discuss how climate change and the drought could have contributed to the civil war in Syria.

About the tool: 

Tool NameDrought, Water, War, and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations 
Topic(s) in DisciplineInternational Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, War, Civil War, Security, Human Migration
Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards; Climate and Society; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance; Climate Change and Food Security 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (5 min 45 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale Climate Connections
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic