Reading: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

E-Learning Courses on Climate Change

Series of two E-Learning Courses on Introduction to Climate Change and Climate Science

Following are two online courses in Climate Change and Climate Science by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

Video/Microlecture: Climate Change and Society

A video lecture that discusses how the social sciences have evolved to address issues of climate change by D. Parthasarathy. This video lecture is part 1 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.  The lecture focuses on the threat and vulnerability of the human population to climate change viewed through the lenses of the social sciences and climate sciences. This lecture discusses how social vulnerability is understood in the social sciences as “vulnerability and adaptation as representing the set of socio-economic factors that determine people’s ability to cope with stress or change” and how it is understood in the climate sciences as “vulnerability is the likelihood of occurrence and impacts of weather and climate related events, and capacity of population groups to reduce vulnerability”. 

The video further discusses how the social sciences have contributed to the understanding of vulnerability by discussing concepts of social inequalities like caste, religion and social status. It also highlights the impact of climate change in developing countries.  Additionally, the lecture discusses the need for a transdisciplinary approach and how the social sciences can further contribute to the understanding of climate change and societal impacts. These include:  

  1. Ethnographic insights: Studies that could discuss cultural values and political relations that influence climate related knowledge and the perception of climate change. This could help formulate better adaptation policies
  2. Historical perspective: History can be used to understand traditional mechanisms of adapting and coping and understanding societal collapse, survival and sustainability. 
  3. Holistic view: Studies that discuss the changing forms of consumption and production and their consequences such as migration and refugee crises. 

Students will learn about understanding climate risk and vulnerability from the perspective of the social sciences. They will also learn about climate change threats and vulnerability and social inequalities such as  caste, religion and social status. Students will further learn about how culture influences societies to adapt, survive, and mitigate the risks of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the role of the social sciences in understanding climate change risks and vulnerability 
  2. Discuss the social inequalities can contribute to climate change induced vulnerability in developing countries

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO1 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 01
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Inequalities, Caste, Religion, Vulnerability, Culture
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance  
Type of tool Video (52 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research , Pune, India
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/ Microlecture: Culture, Politics and Climate Change

A video lecture that discusses the link between politics, culture and climate change by D. Parthasarthy. This video lecture is part 2 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India. The video discusses the politics of climate change, its origin and how it has evolved over time. It further discusses the unequal impacts of climate change on societies, the problem of accountability and responsibility by countries and the ongoing debate between economic development and mitigation of climate change. It discusses the concepts of power of stakeholders, their decision making, societal vulnerability and risk. The video also discusses the current lack of representation in policy making by communities that are directly affected by climate change and hence the need for “knowledge participation”. The lecture further highlights the “social limits to climate action” that includes values, ethics, knowledge and culture which determine climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. The lecture specifically discusses four propositions to understand climate change and culture:

  1. Values and ethics are central to politics where social units are based on ethical principles
  2. Uncertainty leads to failure to adapt and increases vulnerability for certain communities
  3. There is a gap between perception of risk and action 
  4. Cultural aspects are excluded when developing climate adaptation strategies

The lecture then highlights how culture defines the politics of climate change contributing to the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” which discusses the concept of “scientific illiteracy”. D Parthasarathy further discusses the Giddens paradox that highlights the four reasons for decreasing public concern about climate change:

  1. Political campaigns by corporate organizations against policy proposals to reduce carbon emissions
  2. The abstract and vague nature of climate science for a layman to understand
  3. The ‘free-rider’ issue where the impact of climate change affects other countries rather than the country of origin, enabling no action to be taken to control it. 
  4. The debate between economic development and climate change mitigation in developing countries like India.  

The lecture also provides four suggestions put forth by Giddens to tackle these issues: 

  1. Political leaders must be convinced to take action 
  2. Small regional climate change agreements must be made instead of international agreements where accountability and responsibility are hard to monitor. 
  3. Companies that use fossil fuels must be challenged by local companies 
  4. Promotion of local activism to influence global action

Students will learn about the politics of climate change. They will learn about the existing politics of climate change and how vulnerability, risk and uncertainty affects decision making by individuals and societies. Students will further learn about the inherent presence of societal values, ethics, vulnerability, power and risk that determine societal ignorance, knowledge and perception of climate change. Through the four propositions, they will learn about the need for a transdisciplinary approach to ensure effective adaptation and mitigation strategies. Additionally, students will learn about the “knowledge-ignorance paradox’, the Giddens paradox and media representation and how this influences the public perception and concern of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between culture and climate politics 
  2. How do the concepts of power, risk, uncertainty and vulnerability affect climate change policies?
  3. Discuss the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” and its influence on public concern
  4. Discuss the Giddens paradox and its four hypotheses and their impact on climate mitigation policies. 

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO2 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 02
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics, Social Inequalities, Knowledge-Ignorance Paradox, Giddens Paradox
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video (46 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Safeguarding Human Rights in the Context of Climate Change

A reading to learn about the effects of climate change on human rights, governmental responsibility in addressing these human rights issues, assessment of actions implemented, and recommendations on integrating human rights considerations with climate adaptation and mitigation actions.

Video/micro lecture: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A video lecture by Vibhuti Patel, SNDT Women’s University, India, titled ‘Gender and Climate Change’ that discusses gender dimensions of climate change. This lecture discusses the role of women in households and how climate change induced events such as natural and manmade disasters, water and food shortages and deforestation differentially impact them. Additionally, the lecture discusses examples of indigenous tribes and local knowledge systems. The lecture further discusses the current role of women in the climate change discourse, women’s ecological movements, and the need to include women in decision and policy making.  

Students will learn about the impacts of climate change on women. They will also learn about how women are far more vulnerable to climatic events and hence the need to ensure that women are included in climate policy and decision making. Students will further learn a brief history of women’s ecological movements in India and the current role women play in reducing the impacts of climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change.
  2. Discuss the symbiotic relationship of indigenous women and the natural environment. 
  3. Discuss the women’s ecological movement in India. 

About the tool

Tool NameGender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Women Studies, Women’s Ecological Movement 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (33 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byVidya-Mitra Channel by National Mission on Education through Information and Communication Technology, MHRD, India
Hosted atYouTube 
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Differential Calculus using Methane Data

A classroom/laboratory activity for Mathematics teachers to teach about Differential Calculus, specifically, about polynomial differentiation focusing on  Tangent Line Problem and Curve Fitting. This activity contains yearly data of the globally averaged marine surface methane from 1984 to 2019. Methane is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions – a potential cause of global warming.

Students will learn the use of scatter plot and curve fitting to derive the polynomial differentiation function. Further this activity will allow students to predict future methane concentrations.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are polynomial differentiation functions?
  2. Derive a polynomial function using the given methane concentration date.
  3. Calculate future methane concentration using polynomial differentiation.

About the Tool

Tool Name Global Marine Surface CH4
Discipline Mathematics and Statistics
Topic(s) in Discipline Differential Calculus, Polynomial Differentiation, Tangent Line Problem, Scatter Plot, Curve Fitting
Climate Topic Classroom/Laboratory Activity
Type of Tool Video (64 mins)
Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Thomas J. Pfaff (Ithaca College)
Hosted at Sustainability Math
Link Link
Access Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Climate Change and the Decline of Insect Population

A short article that describes the decline of insect population due to climate change. This article by the Entomological Society of America focuses on the importance of insects in food webs and how climate change affects their distribution.

Students will learn how a changing climate generally reduces the population of insects and potentially alters the food web. Further, they will learn about the impacts on food security and the potential spread of vector-borne diseases. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why are insects important to an ecosystem? 
  2. How does climate change affect insect populations? 
  3. Discuss the impacts of climate change on insect population, food security and disease.

About the tool

Tool Name Climate-Change Impact on Insects ‘Simply Cannot be Ignored’
Discipline Biological Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Insects, Arthropods, Insect Biodiversity, Food Web, Food Security, Invasive Species, Vector-borne Diseases
Climate Topic  Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool  Reading
Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Location Global
Language English 
Translation
Developed by Entomological Society of America
Hosted at Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Link https://www.entsoc.org/climate-change-impact-insects-simply-cannot-be-ignored
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video: Noam Chomsky on Climate Education Policy

A video lecture by Dr. Noam Chomsky on Public Policy and Climate Change Education. This video discusses legislative processes of public education related to climate change, renewable energy, and fossil fuels. It specifically discusses how, in certain cases, the notion that there is a lack of scientific consensus on climate change can be used to fuel climate denial propaganda through public education. 

Students will learn about the Public Education system in the US and the possible role of corporations in influencing curriculum. They will further learn how public perception can be influenced through climate change education policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of corporations and their influence in public education policy  in the US?
  2. How does the notion that there is a ‘lack of scientific consensus in climate science’ used in climate change denial rhetoric in the US?
  3. What is the role of public education policy in promoting the continued use of fossil fuels over renewable energy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky “Global Warming and The Common Good”
Discipline Social Sciences, Public Policy, Education
Topic(s) in Discipline Education Policy, Public Education, Education Legislation, Climate Change Education, Climate Denial
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (22 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Leigha Cohen Video Production
Hosted at Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Game: Understanding Climate Vulnerabilities and Building Climate Resilience

A game that provides an immersive learning experience to visualize the possible effects of climate change on our cities and neighborhoods in the future, and to explore actions for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Video/Micro lecture: Karl Marx and Climate Change

A short video titled ‘Marxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?’ by Graham Murdock, Loughborough University, that discusses the impact of capitalism on climate change. Murdock discusses Marx’s commentary on the breakdown of the relationship of humans with nature due the industrialization of agricultural practices.

Students will learn the foundations of Marx’s theory of Capitalism and its historical development and  capitalism’s influence on climate change. They will also learn about how rapid industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming. They will further learn how Marx’s analysis on ecology could also provide the solutions to problems in the context of climate change

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are Marx’s main tenets about Capitalism?
  2. What are Marx’s fundamental problems with Capitalism?
  3. Discuss how industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming.

About the tool

Tool NameMarxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxism, Marxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Political Science
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (11 mins) 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCGTN
Hosted atYouTube 
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-i242fEKyY
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Climate Change and Trade Policies

A classroom/ laboratory activity by Alan Green, Stetson University, that uses a team debate approach for a two-step discussion on trade policies. The first step is a discussion on the long term trend of declining employment in manufacturing in the U.S. The second step is a discussion on the challenge of climate change and international trade agreements.

Students will learn to apply economic models and analysis to support their arguments on relevant policy issues. They will also learn about protectionist measures, demand-supply analysis, direct and indirect compensation, manufacturing trends, and international trade. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are some protectionist policies to counter decline in manufacturing?
  2. How is international trade impacted by climate change?
  3. How can trade agreements be more inclusive of climate change threats?

About the Tool

Tool NameTrade Applications: Addressing the Decline of Manufacturing and the Challenge of Climate Change Through Trade Policy
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Trade, Trade Policy, Trade Agreements, Demand and Supply, International Trade
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolClassroom/ Laboratory Activity (50-75 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byAlan Green, Stetson University
Hosted atStarting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The COVID-19 Pandemic, Recession and Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy, Economic Recovery, Economic Policy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Conflict and water wars

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic