Video/micro lecture: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

E-Learning Courses on Climate Change

Series of two E-Learning Courses on Introduction to Climate Change and Climate Science

Following are two online courses in Climate Change and Climate Science by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

Reading: Safeguarding Human Rights in the Context of Climate Change

A reading to learn about the effects of climate change on human rights, governmental responsibility in addressing these human rights issues, assessment of actions implemented, and recommendations on integrating human rights considerations with climate adaptation and mitigation actions.

Differential Calculus using Methane Data

A classroom/laboratory activity for Mathematics teachers to teach about Differential Calculus, specifically, about polynomial differentiation focusing on  Tangent Line Problem and Curve Fitting. This activity contains yearly data of the globally averaged marine surface methane from 1984 to 2019. Methane is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions – a potential cause of global warming.

Students will learn the use of scatter plot and curve fitting to derive the polynomial differentiation function. Further this activity will allow students to predict future methane concentrations.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are polynomial differentiation functions?
  2. Derive a polynomial function using the given methane concentration date.
  3. Calculate future methane concentration using polynomial differentiation.

About the Tool

Tool Name Global Marine Surface CH4
Discipline Mathematics and Statistics
Topic(s) in Discipline Differential Calculus, Polynomial Differentiation, Tangent Line Problem, Scatter Plot, Curve Fitting
Climate Topic Classroom/Laboratory Activity
Type of Tool Video (64 mins)
Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Thomas J. Pfaff (Ithaca College)
Hosted at Sustainability Math
Link Link
Access Offline
Computer Skills Basic

E-learning Course: Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in African Cities

An e-learning course to understand the drivers and impacts of climate change in cities, and to learn about various planning and decision-making approaches for climate change adaptation in African cities.

Reading: Gender and Climate Change Policy

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Visualization, Classroom/Laboratory Activity: A Story Map on Climate Change and Human Migration

A visualization and classroom/laboratory activity to learn about regions and communities that are affected by the problem of climate refugees and environmental migration because of the effects of climate change.

Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Climate Change and Trade Policies

A classroom/ laboratory activity by Alan Green, Stetson University, that uses a team debate approach for a two-step discussion on trade policies. The first step is a discussion on the long term trend of declining employment in manufacturing in the U.S. The second step is a discussion on the challenge of climate change and international trade agreements.

Students will learn to apply economic models and analysis to support their arguments on relevant policy issues. They will also learn about protectionist measures, demand-supply analysis, direct and indirect compensation, manufacturing trends, and international trade. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What are some protectionist policies to counter decline in manufacturing?
  2. How is international trade impacted by climate change?
  3. How can trade agreements be more inclusive of climate change threats?

About the Tool

Tool NameTrade Applications: Addressing the Decline of Manufacturing and the Challenge of Climate Change Through Trade Policy
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Trade, Trade Policy, Trade Agreements, Demand and Supply, International Trade
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolClassroom/ Laboratory Activity (50-75 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byAlan Green, Stetson University
Hosted atStarting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The COVID-19 Pandemic, Recession and Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy, Economic Recovery, Economic Policy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro lecture: Karl Marx and Climate Change

A short video titled ‘Marxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?’ by Graham Murdock, Loughborough University, that discusses the impact of capitalism on climate change. Murdock discusses Marx’s commentary on the breakdown of the relationship of humans with nature due the industrialization of agricultural practices.

Students will learn the foundations of Marx’s theory of Capitalism and its historical development and  capitalism’s influence on climate change. They will also learn about how rapid industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming. They will further learn how Marx’s analysis on ecology could also provide the solutions to problems in the context of climate change

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are Marx’s main tenets about Capitalism?
  2. What are Marx’s fundamental problems with Capitalism?
  3. Discuss how industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming.

About the tool

Tool NameMarxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxism, Marxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Political Science
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (11 mins) 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCGTN
Hosted atYouTube 
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-i242fEKyY
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Classroom/ Laboratory activity: Climate Mitigation and Willingness to Pay

A classroom/laboratory activity based on data on citizens’ willingness to pay to reduce carbon emissions as a method of mitigating climate change. This data is collected through an online survey by the German government and is available for download in Excel, R, and Google Sheet formats.

Students will be able to analyse the data to construct indices for measuring attitudes or opinions. They will also learn to use Cronbach’s alpha and Likert scale. Additionally, they will use mean, standard deviation, correlation/correlation coefficient, and confidence interval to analyze the results. Through this activity, they will be able to compare the measures of willingness to pay with climate policymaking. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘willingness to pay’?
  2. How to measure willingness to pay for non-market goods like abatement to pollution?
  3. What is Cronbach’s alpha? How is it used to assess indices for internal consistency?

About the tool

Tool NameMeasuring Willingness to Pay for Climate Change Mitigation
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Likert Scale, Cronbach’s Alpha, Value of Abatement, Contingent Valuation, Climate Change Economics
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Classroom/ Laboratory Activity  
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCORE Project
Hosted atCORE Project Website
Linkhttps://www.core-econ.org/doing-economics/book/text/11-01.html
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsIntermediate

Reading: Economic Recovery post COVID-19

A policy brief by The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds on the  significance of carbon pricing for reducing carbon emissions in the context of post COVID-19 pandemic economic recovery.

Students will learn about carbon pricing, citizen dividend, and green recovery policies. They will be introduced to green economic policies such as zero-carbon investments, removal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and using carbon pricing revenues for economic recovery. Additionally, they will also understand why carbon pricing is an effective strategy to reduce carbon emissions worldwide while simultaneously providing better government revenue than traditional taxation policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How does carbon pricing help to reduce carbon emissions? 
  3. What is the significance of carbon pricing in the economic recovery plans from the COVID-19 pandemic?

About the tool

Tool NamePricing carbon during the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Emissions, Economic Policies, Citizen Dividend, Economic Recovery, COVID-19, COVID-19 Pandemic and the Economy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) Website
Linkhttps://www.cccep.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Pricing-carbon-during-the-recovery-from-the-COVID-19-pandemic.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Introduction to Carbon Pricing

A reading by the World Bank Group that introduces what is carbon pricing and discusses the link between carbon pricing and climate change policies. The reading  includes sections on 

  1. Main types of carbon pricing
  2. International carbon pricing
  3. Regional, national and subnational carbon pricing
  4. Internal carbon pricing
  5. How to do carbon pricing right

Students will learn about carbon pricing and economic policy, decarbonisation, clean technology and market innovation. They will also learn about how carbon pricing can influence economic development and growth and inform climate change policies. Students will further learn about the types of carbon pricing that governments and businesses refer to in order to make well informed economic decisions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How is carbon pricing used as an instrument for climate change policies?

About the tool

Tool NameWhat is Carbon Pricing?
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Economic Growth, Climate Change Policies, Decarbonisation 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe World Bank  
Hosted atThe World Bank
Linkhttps://carbonpricingdashboard.worldbank.org/what-carbon-pricing
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic