Reading: Climate Risk and Megacities

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on the impacts of climate change on large urban cities.The reading describes risks and direct and indirect impacts of climate change on the security of urban cities specifically coastal megacities.

Students will understand the impacts of climate change on urban megacities including large coastal agglomerates. They will also learn about the fragility and resilience of cities vulnerable to security risks caused by climate change.They will further understand related security, environmental, human rights and governance issues and policies.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact urban coastal cities? 
  2. How does climate change cause human migration and displacement? Give examples.
  3. Does migration to megacities create instability and conflict? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameCoastal Megacities vs. The Sea: Climate and Security in Urban Spaces
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineUrban Environment, Development Studies, Urbanization, Human Migration, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJanani Vivekananda and Neil Bhatiya in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/7_coastal-megacities.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Introduction to Carbon Pricing

A reading by the World Bank Group that introduces what is carbon pricing and discusses the link between carbon pricing and climate change policies. The reading  includes sections on 

  1. Main types of carbon pricing
  2. International carbon pricing
  3. Regional, national and subnational carbon pricing
  4. Internal carbon pricing
  5. How to do carbon pricing right

Students will learn about carbon pricing and economic policy, decarbonisation, clean technology and market innovation. They will also learn about how carbon pricing can influence economic development and growth and inform climate change policies. Students will further learn about the types of carbon pricing that governments and businesses refer to in order to make well informed economic decisions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How is carbon pricing used as an instrument for climate change policies?

About the tool

Tool NameWhat is Carbon Pricing?
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Economic Growth, Climate Change Policies, Decarbonisation 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe World Bank  
Hosted atThe World Bank
Linkhttps://carbonpricingdashboard.worldbank.org/what-carbon-pricing
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 2

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains predictions on mortality, ecosystems and income levels. This reading includes results of their modelling that states that climate change will cause an average of 5% reduction in the global per capita consumption over the next 2 centuries, with an addition of 145 – 220 million people falling below poverty line in South Asian and sub-Saharan Africa by 2100, and an expected increase in child mortality to 165,000 – 250,000 children per year.  The reading is subdivided into four chapters, as follows:

  1. How climate change will affect people around the world: This chapter draws correlations between climate change and potential implications for access to food, water stress, health and well-being, land and the environment. It gives a detailed analysis of global warming implications from 1ºC rise up to temperature change of 5ºC and above. [pp 55 – 91 (as per table of contents) or pp 100 – 136 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Implications of climate change for development: This chapter looks at developing countries and their vulnerability to climate change due to their dependence on climate sensitive sectors such as agriculture. Apart from food insecurity and damage to the healthcare systems, there will be mass migrations and conflict which will hamper growth and development. [pp 92 – 121 (as per table of contents) or pp 137 – 166 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Costs of climate change in developed countries: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate change on the developed countries and explains how for moderate amounts of warming some higher latitude countries will face short-term benefits due to rise in agriculture yields, lower winter mortality, lower heating requirements and possible boosts in tourism. However, they will face disastrous impacts due to climate shocks at higher temperatures. [pp 122 – 142 (as per table of contents) or pp 167 – 187 (as per scrolling)]
  4. Economic modelling of climate change impacts: This chapter details the modelling work conducted for estimating the monetary impact of climate change by using an Integrated Assessment Model with a temperature rise of 2-3ºC as the starting point. [pp 143 – 167 (as per table of contents) or pp 188 – 212 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how melting glaciers, crop yield decline, ocean acidification, displacement, malnutrition, rising sea levels and species extinction will impact the global economy through empirical analysis. They will also learn what makes developing countries most vulnerable to climate change. They will understand how certain adverse effects of climate change are already underway and early mitigation may be the only way to control the impacts. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How will a 2ºC temperature rise scenario differ from a 4ºC temperature rise scenario?
  2. Discuss climate vulnerabilities of:
    1. Developed Countries
    2. Developing Countries
  3. Define and explain the ‘Mendelsohn’ model, the ‘Tol’ model, and the ‘Nordhaus’ model.

About the Tool

Tool NamePart II: The Impacts of climate change on growth and development from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Econometrics, Integrated Assessment Model, Per Capita Consumption, GDP, Economic Growth
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 55 to 167 ) –  as per table of content; (pp 100 – 212) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
Linkhttp://mudancasclimaticas.cptec.inpe.br/~rmclima/pdfs/destaques/sternreview_report_complete.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 3

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains discussions on the need to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the subsequents cost of doing the same. The reading is subdivided into seven chapters, as follows:

  1. Projecting the growth of greenhouse gas emissions: This chapter discusses the past drivers of global emissions growth and a future prediction with ‘business-as-usual’ scenario in case of climate policy inaction.  [pp 169 – 192 (as per table of contents) or pp 214- 237 (as per scrolling)]
  2. The challenge of stabilisation: This chapter details steps that can be taken to stabilise GHG emissions and the cost of delay. [pp 193 – 210 (as per table of contents) or pp 238 – 255 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Identifying the costs of mitigation: This chapter looks at how mitigation costs are identified for various methods to reduce GHG emissions, who will pay for them, and what will be the long-term impacts of GHG cost-cutting. [pp 211 – 238 (as per table of contents) or pp 256 – 283(as per scrolling)]
  4. Macroeconomic models of costs: This chapter goes into the modelling approaches to calculate costs, the factors that may impact these costs, and how GHG emission cost-cutting might affect GDP. [pp 239 – 252 (as per table of contents) or pp 284 – 297 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Structural change and competitiveness: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate-change policies about market structure, trade, location and industrial emissions on market competitiveness.  [pp 253 – 268 (as per table of contents) or pp 298 – 313(as per scrolling)]
  6. Opportunities and wider benefits from climate policies: This chapter looks at the benefits and opportunities of climate change action for various industries and services and how it will impact the overall financial market.  [pp 269 -283 (as per table of contents) or pp 314 – 328 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Towards a goal for climate change policy: This chapter looks at cost-benefit analysis and climate change policy in the long run with a focus on fast changes to avoid adverse risks.  [pp 284 – 307 (as per table of contents) or pp 329 – 352(as per scrolling)]

Students will learn the cause of the rise in greenhouse gas emissions and how, due to advancement in energy technology, income growth is no longer solely dependent on emission growth. They will also learn that the benefits of climate change policies for markets and industries outweigh its costs in the long-run. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What will happen if we continue with the ‘business-as-usual’ scenario of greenhouse gas emissions?
  2. State cost-effective methods and techniques to reduce greenhouse gas emission.
  3. How does The Review calculate marginal costs and marginal benefits of climate change policy?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart III: The economics of stabilisation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Integrated Assessment Model, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 168 to 307) –  as per table of content; (pp 213 – 352) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory activity: Climate Mitigation and Willingness to Pay

A classroom/laboratory activity based on data on citizens’ willingness to pay to reduce carbon emissions as a method of mitigating climate change. This data is collected through an online survey by the German government and is available for download in Excel, R, and Google Sheet formats.

Students will be able to analyse the data to construct indices for measuring attitudes or opinions. They will also learn to use Cronbach’s alpha and Likert scale. Additionally, they will use mean, standard deviation, correlation/correlation coefficient, and confidence interval to analyze the results. Through this activity, they will be able to compare the measures of willingness to pay with climate policymaking. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘willingness to pay’?
  2. How to measure willingness to pay for non-market goods like abatement to pollution?
  3. What is Cronbach’s alpha? How is it used to assess indices for internal consistency?

About the tool

Tool NameMeasuring Willingness to Pay for Climate Change Mitigation
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Likert Scale, Cronbach’s Alpha, Value of Abatement, Contingent Valuation
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Classroom/ Laboratory Activity  
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCORE Project
Hosted atCORE Project Website
Linkhttps://www.core-econ.org/doing-economics/book/text/11-01.html
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsIntermediate

Reading: Willingness to Cooperate and Climate Policy

A reading titled ‘Cooperation in the Climate Commons’ by the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. This working paper describes the willingness to cooperate as a climate solution and how it is impacted by different mitigation efforts.

Students will learn how mitigation efforts depend either on an individual’s willingness to voluntarily adapt ‘green’ consumer behaviour or through enforcement of costly public policy or a combination of the two. They will further study how various factors, such as peer pressure, social interventions, individual beliefs, trust in economic development, and local punishment policies, impact mitigation efforts. They will also learn how international and domestic climate policy affects individuals’ willingness to cooperate. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are ‘climate commons’?
  2. How does willingness to cooperate through voluntary adaptation of green consumer behaviour differ from forceful implementation of costly public policy?
  3. What is the ‘zero-contribution’ proposition and why did the study reject it?

About the tool

Tool NameCooperation in the Climate Commons
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Theory, Willingness to Cooperate, Public Policy, Climate Commons, Global Commons, Tragedy of the Commons, Mitigation
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. Authored by Stefano Carattini, Simon Levin and Alessandro Tavoni
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, UK
Linkhttps://www.cccep.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/working-paper-259-Carattini-et-al.pdf?from_serp=1
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Willingness to Pay for Climate Stability

A review article by Evan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on willingness to pay (WTP) for climate policy. This working paper is divided into five sections as follows:

  1. Section 1 describes the characteristics of WTP as an empirical tool for climate stability.
  2. Section 2 discusses literature review on WTP for climate policy, through to social and behavioural aspects.
  3. Section 3 explains calculations used and the results of comparison of various studies.
  4. Section 4 discusses a new research agenda to improve factors for identifying WTP.
  5. Section 5 concludes the study.

Students will learn about WTP in context to climate stability and the need to study it. They will also learn about which factors are commonly used to identify WTP and how they are calculated through empirical assessment. Additionally they will also learn about the challenges of using the current factors in determining the WTP and what can be done to improve its measurement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is willingness to pay (WTP)?
  2. How is WTP calculated with regards to climate policy?
  3. What factors are commonly used to define willingness to change and how can they be improved?

About the tool

Tool NameWillingness to Pay for Climate Policy: A Review of Estimates
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Economic Theory, Public Policy, Integrated Assessment Model, Consumer Psychology
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEvan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hosted atSocial Science Research Network Website
Linkhttps://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1626931
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Water, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gendered roles of water provision and management. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the access, consumption and use of water resources by women. It also focuses on  challenges that women face due to climate change induced water scarcity.

Students will learn about gender inequalities with regards to water accessibility, consumption and utilization. They will also learn how climate change may increase the burden and responsibilities on women due to water scarcity and other impacts.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of water management and climate change. 
  2. What challenges do women face due to climate change induced water scarcity?
  3. How does women’s knowledge of household water issues contribute to effective water management and planning?

About the tool 

Tool NameWater, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Water, Water Management, Water Scarcity
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/water.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Waste, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes waste management, gender and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses gender inequalities, labour, and consumption in the formal and informal waste management sectors of high-income, middle-income and low-income countries. 

Students will learn about waste management and climate change and gender inequalities in the sector. They will also learn about marginalization of women in the formal and informal waste industry.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of the waste management sector and climate change.
  2. Why is it necessary to consider women’s needs in effective waste management systems?

About the tool 

Tool NameWaste, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Waste Management
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/waste.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Transport, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the effects of transport on climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the gender differences in the use, patterns and means of transportation as related to urban planning and climate change. 

Students will learn about the gender differences in the transport sector in developing and industrialized countries. They will also learn about how transport systems need to be gender sensitive. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of the transport sector and climate change.
  2. Why is it necessary to consider women’s interests and needs in transport system planning?

About the tool 

Tool NameTransport, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Transport, Urban Planning, Mobility
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/transport.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Tourism, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes gender dimensions of tourism and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the differences in contributions of men and women in the travel and tourism industry- a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. 

Students will learn about the link between the tourism industry, gender and climate change. They will also learn about gender differences in transport use and access to mobility.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of the tourism industry and climate change. 
  2. Why is there a need to have a gender sensitive perspective for climate change and tourism policies?

About the tool 

Tool NameTourism, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Tourism, Travel
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/tourism.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Population, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes gender dimensions of population growth and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses gender, demographics and population dynamics in climate change policies. 

Students will learn about the importance of population growth in climate change mitigation and adaptation. They will understand the risks from climate impacts to women. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of population growth and climate change.
  2. How can women play an important role in mitigating climate change?
  3. Why is there a need to have a gender sensitive perspective for climate change and population policies?

About the tool

Tool NamePopulation, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Population, Population Dynamics, Demography 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/population.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Migration, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes challenges that men and women face due to climate change induced human migration. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses impacts of climate change induced migration on women. 

Students will learn about the direct and indirect impacts of climate change influenced migration on women. They will also learn about how the responsibilities of women tend to increase due to migration of male members of the household. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of human migration due to climate change. 
  2. Why is there a need to have a gender sensitive perspective in climate change and migration policies?

About the tool

Tool NameMigration, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/migration.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Health, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gendered impacts of climate change on human health.This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses how climate change impacts the health of men and women differently and gender differences in terms of access to health information, resources and programmes.

Students will learn about the gender specific impacts of climate change on health. They will also learn about how women may be differently vulnerable to climate change and their specific needs. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss how climate change can affect the health of men and women differently. 
  2. Why is there a need to have a gender sensitive perspective in climate change and health policies?

About the tool 

Tool NameHealth, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Health
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/health.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Forests, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions in forestry and climate change.This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the importance of women’s knowledge of local forest resources for providing livelihoods and how climate change may impact the same. 

Students will learn about gendered aspects of forestry and agroforestry in several communities worldwide. They will also learn about the importance of women’s participation in forest related policy making, mitigating deforestation and climate change. 

Use this to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss gender dimensions of forestry and climate change. 
  2. How can women’s local knowledge of forestry be used to mitigate climate change and influence climate change policies?

About the tool

Tool NameForests, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Forestry, Agroforestry, Deforestation
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/forests.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Energy, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions of energy consumption and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading discusses gender differences in energy production, consumption and access in developing and developed countries.  

Students will learn about the gender differences in the energy sector. They will also learn about the low levels of female participation in energy planning and decision-making.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gendered differences in the energy sector.
  2. How does energy consumption differ for men and women in developed and developing countries?
  3. Discuss the importance of women’s participation in energy and climate change policies. 

About the tool

Tool NameEnergy, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Energy Consumption, Energy Production, Energy Access, Energy Poverty
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/energy.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Disaster, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gendered impacts of natural disasters potentially caused due to climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading discusses the biological, economic, social and cultural differences that cause men and women to react differently to disasters.  

Students will learn about the gendered impacts of natural disasters and disaster management. They will also learn about the importance of women’s knowledge in disaster management and climate change mitigation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the gendered impacts of natural disasters.
  2. How do women play an important role in disaster management?
  3. “Specific attention should be paid to the inclusion of non-indigenous and indigenous women.” Discuss with regards to climate related disasters. 

About the tool

Tool NameDisaster, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Disasters, Disaster Management
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/disaster.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Consumption, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions of consumerism and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses consumption by men and women and lifestyle choices with regards to climate change.  

Students will be introduced to differences in consumption patterns of men and women. They will learn about gender in labour, rights and resource access. They will further learn about the need for sustainable consumption to mitigate climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change and consumerism. 
  2. What are the two main factors that contribute to differences in consumption by men and women?

About the tool

Tool NameConsumption, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Consumerism Consumption, Lifestyle
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/consumption.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Biodiversity, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions of climate change with relation to biodiversity and ecosystems. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the traditional role of women as household managers, how they tend to use natural resources in the house, traditional knowledge systems and current gender gaps in the sector. 

Students will be introduced to the role of women in household related natural resource use and decision making. They will learn the importance of women’s knowledge of local biodiversity and their efforts in conservation and natural resource management. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change in biodiversity and natural resource management.
  2. Discuss gender inequality in terms of needs, knowledge and behaviour in biodiversity conservation.
  3. Discuss the term “biopiracy”.
  4. Discuss the current state of women representation in biodiversity, conservation and natural resource management.

About the tool 

Tool NameBiodiversity, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Gender and Biodiversity, Biodiversity, Conservation, Natural Resource Management
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/biodiversity.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Agriculture, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gender dimensions of climate change in the agricultural sector. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. This reading specifically discusses the role of women in the agricultural sector, gender inequality in terms of access to agricultural  resources and the current gender gaps in the sector.  

Students will be introduced to division of labour in the agricultural sector according to gender. They will learn that even though more women work in this sector, they often benefit less than men in many parts of the world.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change in the agricultural sector.
  2. Discuss gender inequality in terms of access to agricultural resources and opportunities. 
  3. “Market-based solutions to climate change can have negative impacts on women in agriculture”. Discuss in the classroom.
  4. Discuss the current state of women representation in decision making processes and policies in the agricultural sector.

About the tool

Tool NameAgriculture, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Gender and Agriculture, Agriculture
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic