Reading: Postcolonial Studies and Climate Change

A reading by Dipesh Chakrabarty, The University of Chicago titled ‘Postcolonial Studies and the Challenge of Climate Change’ that discusses the link between globalization and global warming. Chakrabarty discusses this link through the writings of Homi K. Bhabha, that aims to stretch post colonial thinking to include the reality of climate change and global warming. The reading also discusses the challenges that climate change issues pose in a “neoliberal” capitalist world. Chakrabarty highlights the three images of human that currently exist:

  1. The universalist-Enlightenment view of the human with the ability to exercise rights 
  2. The globalized view of the human
  3. The human as a geological force that changes the climate 

Chakrabarty makes this distinction to understand the current debate between society, globalization and climate change. Through the writings of Homi K. Bhabha, the reading discusses ‘the postcolonial criticism of the human’ and ‘the human in the anthropocene’ that focuses on issues such as anthropogenic global warming, degradation of the natural environment and the development of humanity. 

Students will learn about postcolonial globalization and climate change. They will also learn about the criticism that postcolonial thinkers have about the current age of the anthropocene and the increasing changes in the climate. Students will further learn about the attempts that postcolonial thinkers have made to ensure that climate change and global warming are part of the human reality for future preservation of the environment. Additionally, students will learn about the failed recognition that society gives to the interdependence of humans on nature and its natural beings.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the link between globalization and climate change?
  2. How do postcolonial thinkers criticise the age of the anthropocene?
  3. Discuss the three images that postcolonial thinkers have created for the human 
  4. How can postcolonial studies about the anthropocene inform the future?

About the Tool 

Tool NamePostcolonial Studies and the Challenge of Climate Change 
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePostcolonial Studies, Cultural Studies, Neoliberalism, Anthropocene, Globalization, Capitalism
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDipesh Chakrabarty New Literary History (Vol 43, 1)
Hosted atThe Johns Hopkins University Press
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Introduction to the Carbon Cycle

An infographic that describes the Carbon Cycle and how anthropogenic activities affect the Carbon Cycle. This infographic by NASA explains how higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities are affecting the natural carbon cycle.

Students will learn about the carbon cycle and the absorption of carbon dioxide by the land and oceans. They will further be introduced to facts and figures regarding the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the ‘Carbon Cycle’ in the classroom. 
  2. How do anthropogenic activities affect carbon dioxide concentrations? 

About the tool

Tool NameEarth’s carbon cycle is off balance
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences; Chemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Cycle, Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate Topic Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNASA
Hosted atClimate NASA Website
Linkhttps://climate.nasa.gov/climate_resources/136/infographic-earths-carbon-cycle-is-off-balance/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change

A reading that describes natural carbon sources and sinks. This reading by Noelle Eckley Selin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes how anthropogenic activities alter the concentration of carbon in various sources and sinks, thus, contributing to global warming.

Students will learn about the various types of carbon sinks and sources. They will further understand the importance of the removal of this excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using technologies for carbon capture and storage, and carbon sequestration.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the natural sources and sinks of carbon on Earth?
  2. Discuss the importance of carbon sequestration for climate mitigation.
  3. Discuss carbon sequestration through carbon capture and storage technologies.

About the tool

Tool NameCarbon Sequestration
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Sequestration, Carbon Capture and Storage, Carbon Sources and Sinks
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Climate and the Biosphere; Climate and the Lithosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byNoelle Eckley Selin
Hosted atBritannica
Linkhttps://www.britannica.com/technology/carbon-sequestration
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Long-term Cost of Climate Change

A reading by Louise Lerner, The University of Chicago, that summarises the economic cost of carbon as viewed from the perspective of geologists. This research challenges the traditional cost of carbon, which has been priced at $100 per ton of carbon emission, by stating the cost of carbon to be between $10,000 to $750,000 depending on the geophysical and economic scenarios.

Students will learn about the cost of carbon, discount rate, climate models, and socioeconomic costs amongst others. They will learn the difference between short term and long term carbon cost modelling and why a carbon cost of $100 does not give a holistic scenario of the impacts of carbon emissions.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘cost of carbon’ imply?
  2. What is the difference between the traditional cost of carbon and the new cost of carbon calculated in this reading?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate change will ultimately cost humanity $100,000 per ton of carbon, scientists estimate
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Economic Cost, Social Cost of Carbon, Cost of Carbon, Discount Rate
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byLouise Lerner,  University of Chicago
Hosted atPhys.org by Science X Network
Linkhttps://phys.org/news/2020-09-climate-ultimately-humanity-ton-carbon.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Post-pandemic Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Economic Recovery post COVID-19

A policy brief by The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds on the  significance of carbon pricing for reducing carbon emissions in the context of post COVID-19 pandemic economic recovery.

Students will learn about carbon pricing, citizen dividend, and green recovery policies. They will be introduced to green economic policies such as zero-carbon investments, removal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and using carbon pricing revenues for economic recovery. Additionally, they will also understand why carbon pricing is an effective strategy to reduce carbon emissions worldwide while simultaneously providing better government revenue than traditional taxation policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How does carbon pricing help to reduce carbon emissions? 
  3. What is the significance of carbon pricing in the economic recovery plans from the COVID-19 pandemic?

About the tool

Tool NamePricing carbon during the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Emissions, Economic Policies, Citizen Dividend, Economic Recovery, COVID-19
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) Website
Linkhttps://www.cccep.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Pricing-carbon-during-the-recovery-from-the-COVID-19-pandemic.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Gender Dimensions of Human Health and Climate Change

A reading by the World Health Organization titled ‘Gender, Climate Change and Health’ that discusses the gender dimensions of human health and climate change. Using specific climatic events such as heatwaves and flooding, the reading discusses some direct and indirect health issues that impact men and women differently. It further discusses issues such as domestic violence and nutrition deficiency and links with climate change. The reading also discusses the increased vulnerability of women to climate risks and hence the need for gender analysis in policy making. The reading also includes discussions on gender-sensitive approaches and gender-responsive interventions to increase health equity and ensure effective climate mitigation and adaptation. The reading is divided into five subtopics: 

  1. A background of gender, health and climate change 
  2. Impacts: Health 
  3. Impacts: social and human consequences of climate change 
  4. Responses to climate change 
  5. Conclusion, gaps in understanding and issues for urgent action 

Students will learn about gender and health inequity to climate change impacts. They will also learn about health risks of climate change to women, the social and human consequences of climate change, and the need to formulate gender-sensitive climate change policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does climate change impact women’s health? 
  2. What are some social consequences of climate change? 
  3. Discuss the need for gender sensitive and inclusive climate policies.

About the tool

Tool NameGender, Climate Change and Health 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Women Studies, Human Health, Domestic Violence
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byWorld Health Organization
Hosted atWorld Health Organization Website
Linkhttps://www.who.int/globalchange/GenderClimateChangeHealthfinal.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The COVID-19 Pandemic, Recession and Economic Policies

A reading by Carbon Brief explaining how countries around the world design economic policies for a ‘green recovery’ from the recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic, by reducing carbon emissions while boosting their economies.

Students will be introduced to terms such as green recovery, green stimulus, and quantitative easing, among others. Through use of the in-built interactive grid, they will also learn about the measures aimed at reducing carbon emissions – referred to as ‘green’ measures – for several major economies such as the United Kingdom, European Union, China, and India. Additionally, they will understand the application of monetary policy such as stimulus packages, unconditional bailouts, grants, loans, and tax reliefs for a post-pandemic green economic recovery.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What does ‘green recovery’ mean in the context of post-pandemic economic policies?
  2. What are some of the economic stimulus packages designed by governments for a ‘green recovery’ from the COVID-19 pandemic?
  3. What could be the impact of ‘green recovery’ economic policies for climate mitigation?

About the tool

Tool NameCoronavirus: Tracking how the world’s ‘green recovery’ plans aim to cut emissions 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Green Recovery, Carbon Emissions, Stimulus Packages, Carbon Taxes, Quantitative Easing
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA, Poland, Canada, Sweden, Norway, Chile, Colombia, Ireland, Spain, Italy, New Zealand, France, Nigeria, Finland, United Kingdom, China, India, Denmark, European Union, South Korea, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySimon Evans and Josh Gabbatiss, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/coronavirus-tracking-how-the-worlds-green-recovery-plans-aim-to-cut-emissions
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The COVID-19 Pandemic, Carbon Pricing, and Economic Recovery

A policy brief by The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds on the  significance of carbon pricing for reducing carbon emissions in the context of post COVID-19 pandemic economic recovery.

Students will learn about carbon pricing, citizen dividend, and green recovery policies. They will be introduced to green economic policies such as zero-carbon investments, removal of fossil-fuel subsidies, and using carbon pricing revenues for economic recovery. Additionally, they will also understand why carbon pricing is an effective strategy to reduce carbon emissions worldwide while simultaneously providing better government revenue than traditional taxation policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How does carbon pricing help to reduce carbon emissions? 
  3. What is the significance of carbon pricing in the economic recovery plans from the COVID-19 pandemic?

About the tool

Tool NamePricing carbon during the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Emissions, Economic Policies, Citizen Dividend, Economic Recovery
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy and the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Concrete Problem

A reading that describes how the cement industry contributes to global warming. This reading by Carbon Brief discusses the production of traditional cement and how this contributes to 8% of carbon dioxide emissions globally. It further highlights the projected increase in demand for concrete, particularly in developing countries, and how this could potentially raise emissions further. 

Students will learn about global large-scale cement production and the resulting carbon emissions. They will also learn about alternate and ‘novel’ methods of production that are being researched and the complexities of switching to these modes of production. They will further understand the practical, political and economic complexities with respect to cutting emissions as per global standards. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is cement and how is it produced?
  2. List some of the reasons ‘emissions per tonne of output’ has reduced in cement production? In contrast, why are sector emissions still on the rise? 
  3. Discuss the current ‘roadmap’ of cement production with respect to the 2C scenario.

About the tool

Tool Name‘Q&A: Why cement emissions matter for climate change’
DisciplineChemistry, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Chemistry, Cement, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Pollution
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJocelyn Timperley, Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/qa-why-cement-emissions-matter-for-climate-change
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Water Cycle

A reading that describes the impacts of climate change on the water cycle of Earth. This reading titled, ‘The Water Cycle and Climate Change’ by UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) Center for Science Education details the effects of climate change on the natural water cycle on Earth.

Students will learn how various processes of the water cycle, such as evaporation, precipitation, and cloud formation, are potentially affected by climate change. They will further understand how these changes in turn could exacerbate the impacts of global warming.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Describe the water cycle.
  2. List some of the ways how climate change can affect the weather.
  3. Discuss the water cycle and how it affects Earth’s climate. 

About the tool

Tool NameThe Water Cycle and Climate Change
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Chemistry, Water Cycle, Biogeochemical Cycles, Hydrologic Cycle, Condensation, Evaporation, Evapotranspiration, Groundwater, Precipitation, Sublimation
Climate Topic Climate and the Hydrosphere; Climate and the Atmosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byUCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) Center for Science Education
Hosted atUCAR Center for Science Education Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: The Greenhouse Effect

A teaching module for teachers that explains what greenhouse gases are and describes their role in causing global warming. This resource developed by the Office for Climate Education (OCE) introduces students to the concept of the greenhouse effect and the importance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.  The module is based on the IPCC Special Report -Global Warming of 1.5°C and has been developed especially for teachers.

Students will be introduced to the topic of greenhouse gases and the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere. They will further learn about the relationship between this effect and global warming. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the ‘greenhouse effect’?
  2. Discuss how the industrial revolution has resulted in an increase in the concentration of some GHGs in the atmosphere and how this contributes to global warming.

About the tool

Tool Name‘A. Understanding global warming’, pages 7-9 of the document,
‘IPCC Special Report “Global Warming of 1.5 0 C”- Summary for Teachers’
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineGreenhouse Effect, Greenhouse Gases (GHGs), Greenhouse Gas Emissions,
Global Warming, Global Warming Potential (GWP)
Climate Topic Greenhouse Effect; Introduction to Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byOffice for Climate Education (OCE)
Hosted atOffice for Climate Education (OCE) Website
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Beer-Lambert Law

A reading that uses the Beer-Lambert Law to highlight the link between greenhouse gases and global warming. This reading by Tom Kuntzleman, Chemical Education Xchange (ChemEd X), uses the Beer-Lambert Law to explain the increasing global warming potential of Earth’s atmosphere due to the higher concentrations of greenhouse gases in recent times.

Students will learn about the composition of the atmosphere and the greenhouse effect. They will also be introduced to the Beer-Lambert Law which is used to study the transmittance of sunlight through the atmosphere. They will further learn how this law can be used to evaluate the absorbance values of individual gases in the atmosphere, particularly greenhouse gases.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the Beer-Lambert Law? How is it expressed in an equation?
  2. Discuss the composition of the atmosphere. 
  3. How do increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases affect the absorbance of sunlight?

About the tool

Tool NameChemical Connections to Climate Change
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineBeer-Lambert Law, Molar Absorptivity, Solar Absorption, Greenhouse Gases
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Greenhouse Effect
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byTom Kuntzleman, Spring Arbor University
Hosted atChemical Education Xchange (ChemEd X) Website
Linkhttps://www.chemedx.org/blog/chemical-connections-climate-change
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Black Carbon – An Introduction

An infographic that contains information on black carbon in the atmosphere and its contribution to global warming. This infographic titled, ‘Black Carbon’, by Climate & Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), explains what black carbon is, its sources, emission rates, impacts on health and climate, and solutions to reduce its emission.

Students will get a brief overview of how black carbon is formed, how long it remains in the atmosphere and its impacts on climate and health. They will also learn about some of the solutions that have been suggested to curb this pollutant. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Describe some of the impacts of black carbon on climate and health.
  2. Discuss the feasibility of the solutions proposed in the infographic in the context of a developing country. 

About the tool

Tool NameBlack carbon
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Chemistry, Allotropy, Allotropes of carbon, Black Carbon, Greenhouse Gas
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere, Greenhouse Effect
Type of tool Reading (Infographic)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byClimate & Clean Air Coalition (CCAC)
Hosted atClimate & Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) Website
Linkhttps://www.ccacoalition.org/en/slcps/black-carbon
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Black Carbon in the Atmosphere

A reading that describes the effects of black carbon on the atmosphere and the climate system. This reading by Carl Zimmer for the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies details the albedo effect of black carbon, how it affects cloud formation, and its warming and cooling effects of the Earth’s surface.

Students will learn that black carbon is potentially second only to carbon dioxide in its heat trapping power. They will also learn about how it affects the Earth’s climate system. Students will further understand the complexities of black carbon emissions and why only certain emissions cause an increase in Earth’s temperature.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is black carbon? 
  2. What are some of the effects of black carbon on clouds? 
  3. Discuss how the deposition of black carbon on ice caps affects the melting of ice?
  4. Explain how black carbon can have a cooling or warming effect on the planet?

About the tool

Tool NameBlack Carbon and Warming: It’s Worse than We Thought
DisciplineChemistry
Topic(s) in DisciplineCarbon Chemistry, Allotropy, Allotropes of carbon, Black Carbon, Greenhouse Gas
Climate Topic Climate and the Atmosphere; Greenhouse Effect
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCarl Zimmer, The New York Times
Hosted atYale Environment 360 (E360), Yale School of  Environment, Website
Linkhttps://e360.yale.edu/features/carl_zimmer_black_carbon_and_global_warming_worse_than_thought
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Pandemics in a Changing World

A reading that describes the relationship between climate change and the occurrence of newly emerging infectious diseases like COVID-19. This reading by Daisy Dunne for Climate Brief discusses the rise in zoonotic diseases due to changes in habitats and closer interactions of humans and wild animals. It further highlights how these interactions are exacerbated by land-use changes such as deforestation and habitat loss.

Students will learn how climate change induced changes to biodiversity and habitat could lead to transmission of viruses from animals to humans. They will further understand how and why pandemics could develop when climate change affects the biogeographical distribution of species. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why is there a possibility of increased incidence of newly emerging viruses in recent times?
  2. How could climate change increase the risk of inter-species virus spillover in the future?
  3. Discuss some of the factors necessary for the transmission of diseases from animals to humans. 

About the tool

Tool NameQ & A: Could climate change and biodiversity loss raise the risk of pandemics?
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineInfectious Diseases, Disease Transmission, Virus, Zoonosis, Virus Spillover, Biodiversity, Habitat Loss
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDaisy Dunne , Carbon Brief
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/q-and-a-could-climate-change-and-biodiversity-loss-raise-the-risk-of-pandemics
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Infectious Diseases In A Warming World

A reading that explains the role of climate change in the spread of infectious diseases. This reading by the World Health Organization describes the various modes of transmission of viral diseases in humans, in animals, and between animals and humans. It further contains examples of how environmental changes have affected the occurrence of various infectious diseases in humans in the past. 

Students will learn about the different ways infectious diseases are transmitted and the association of infectious diseases with climatic conditions. They will also briefly understand how predictive modelling has shown that climate change could potentially result in changes in transmission patterns.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the zoonotic transmission of a disease? Give examples.
  2. Discuss what zoonotic transmission is, in the context of the SARS-CoV-2. 
  3. Discuss process-based (mathematical) models and their use in tracking the spread of malaria.

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change and Infectious Diseases
DisciplineBiological Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineInfectious Diseases, Disease Transmission, Zoonosis, Anthroponosis, Virus, Virus spillover, Malaria
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byWorld Health Organization
Hosted atWorld Health Organization Website
Linkhttps://www.who.int/globalchange/climate/en/chapter6.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change and Crop Pollination

A report that describes the effect of climate change on animal pollinators and crop pollination. This report from 2011 by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) details the different climate variables, such as temperature, precipitation and extreme climate events that affect crop pollination. It further highlights the potential economic implications of climate change on crop pollination and, thereby, on global food security.

Students will understand the effects of climate change on pollinators, and the temperature sensitivity of crop pollinators and entomophilous crops. They will further learn about how climate change has affected quality and quantity of nectar and pollen, phenological events, pollinator behavior, visitation rates, and distribution. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are the impacts of climate change on insect pollination?
  2. Discuss the importance of insect pollination for global food security.

About the tool

Tool NamePotential Effects of Climate Change on Crop Pollination
DisciplineBiological Sciences; Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplinePollination, Fertilization, Insect Pollination, Pollinators, Plant-Pollinator Systems, Adaptations, Nectar Guides, Types of Pollinators
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byFood and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Hosted atFood and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Website
Linkhttp://www.fao.org/3/i2242e/i2242e.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Population Demographics In A Warming World

A short reading by the Population Reference Bureau on climate change impacts and population demographics. This reading discusses potential climate change impacts on human communities with respect to changes in size and distribution of the global population. It also includes discussions on urbanization and population growth in developing countries and population trends like aging. 

Students will learn about projected population trends and impacts of climate change on human communities globally. They will also understand the link between urbanization, demographic changes and global warming. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the impacts of climate change on human communities.
  2. “Urbanization, aging, and growth in less developed countries.. are likely to increase humanity’s vulnerability to climate change” Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change Impacts and Emerging Population Trends: A Recipe for Disaster 
DisciplineSocial Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDemography, Population Demographics, Population Growth, Urbanization, Aging 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byBingham Kennedy Jr., Population Reference Bureau 
Hosted atPopulation Reference Bureau Website
Linkhttps://www.prb.org/resources/climate-change-impacts-emerging-population-trends-disaster/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Marxism and Carbon Markets

A reading titled ‘Greening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets’ by Steffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog that discusses a Marxist assessment of carbon markets and their role in the evolution of global capitalism and climate change. The reading discusses four major marxist concepts: metabolic rift, capitalism and world ecology, uneven development and accumulation through dispossession, sub-imperialism, to establish a structure for an analysis of carbon markets. The reading further discusses the importance of understanding historical global capitalism development and its link to nature, especially within the Global South. 

Students will learn about Marx’s theories and carbon markets and their role in mitigating climate change. They will also learn about the concept of ‘greening capitalism’ and its role in the future of economic growth and development. Students will further learn about the importance of mapping and acknowledging historical global capitalism development to understand the current state of climate change in the Global South. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Greening Capitalism? 
  2. Explain the link between history, capitalism and nature in the Global South
  3. Carbon markets could affect capitalist dynamics to achieve a global sustainable economy. Discuss 

About the tool

Tool NameGreening Capitalism? A Marxist Critique of Carbon Markets
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Greening Capitalism, Historical Materialism
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed bySteffan Bohm, Maria Misoczky and Sandra Moog
Hosted atResearch Gate
Linkhttps://www.researchgate.net/publication/239735675_Greening_Capitalism_A_Marxist_Critique_of_Carbon_Markets
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic