Video/Microlecture: Climate Change and Society

A video lecture that discusses how the social sciences have evolved to address issues of climate change by D. Parthasarathy. This video lecture is part 1 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.  The lecture focuses on the threat and vulnerability of the human population to climate change viewed through the lenses of the social sciences and climate sciences. This lecture discusses how social vulnerability is understood in the social sciences as “vulnerability and adaptation as representing the set of socio-economic factors that determine people’s ability to cope with stress or change” and how it is understood in the climate sciences as “vulnerability is the likelihood of occurrence and impacts of weather and climate related events, and capacity of population groups to reduce vulnerability”. 

The video further discusses how the social sciences have contributed to the understanding of vulnerability by discussing concepts of social inequalities like caste, religion and social status. It also highlights the impact of climate change in developing countries.  Additionally, the lecture discusses the need for a transdisciplinary approach and how the social sciences can further contribute to the understanding of climate change and societal impacts. These include:  

  1. Ethnographic insights: Studies that could discuss cultural values and political relations that influence climate related knowledge and the perception of climate change. This could help formulate better adaptation policies
  2. Historical perspective: History can be used to understand traditional mechanisms of adapting and coping and understanding societal collapse, survival and sustainability. 
  3. Holistic view: Studies that discuss the changing forms of consumption and production and their consequences such as migration and refugee crises. 

Students will learn about understanding climate risk and vulnerability from the perspective of the social sciences. They will also learn about climate change threats and vulnerability and social inequalities such as  caste, religion and social status. Students will further learn about how culture influences societies to adapt, survive, and mitigate the risks of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the role of the social sciences in understanding climate change risks and vulnerability 
  2. Discuss the social inequalities can contribute to climate change induced vulnerability in developing countries

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO1 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 01
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Inequalities, Caste, Religion, Vulnerability, Culture
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance  
Type of tool Video (52 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research , Pune, India
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/ Microlecture: Culture, Politics and Climate Change

A video lecture that discusses the link between politics, culture and climate change by D. Parthasarthy. This video lecture is part 2 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India. The video discusses the politics of climate change, its origin and how it has evolved over time. It further discusses the unequal impacts of climate change on societies, the problem of accountability and responsibility by countries and the ongoing debate between economic development and mitigation of climate change. It discusses the concepts of power of stakeholders, their decision making, societal vulnerability and risk. The video also discusses the current lack of representation in policy making by communities that are directly affected by climate change and hence the need for “knowledge participation”. The lecture further highlights the “social limits to climate action” that includes values, ethics, knowledge and culture which determine climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. The lecture specifically discusses four propositions to understand climate change and culture:

  1. Values and ethics are central to politics where social units are based on ethical principles
  2. Uncertainty leads to failure to adapt and increases vulnerability for certain communities
  3. There is a gap between perception of risk and action 
  4. Cultural aspects are excluded when developing climate adaptation strategies

The lecture then highlights how culture defines the politics of climate change contributing to the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” which discusses the concept of “scientific illiteracy”. D Parthasarathy further discusses the Giddens paradox that highlights the four reasons for decreasing public concern about climate change:

  1. Political campaigns by corporate organizations against policy proposals to reduce carbon emissions
  2. The abstract and vague nature of climate science for a layman to understand
  3. The ‘free-rider’ issue where the impact of climate change affects other countries rather than the country of origin, enabling no action to be taken to control it. 
  4. The debate between economic development and climate change mitigation in developing countries like India.  

The lecture also provides four suggestions put forth by Giddens to tackle these issues: 

  1. Political leaders must be convinced to take action 
  2. Small regional climate change agreements must be made instead of international agreements where accountability and responsibility are hard to monitor. 
  3. Companies that use fossil fuels must be challenged by local companies 
  4. Promotion of local activism to influence global action

Students will learn about the politics of climate change. They will learn about the existing politics of climate change and how vulnerability, risk and uncertainty affects decision making by individuals and societies. Students will further learn about the inherent presence of societal values, ethics, vulnerability, power and risk that determine societal ignorance, knowledge and perception of climate change. Through the four propositions, they will learn about the need for a transdisciplinary approach to ensure effective adaptation and mitigation strategies. Additionally, students will learn about the “knowledge-ignorance paradox’, the Giddens paradox and media representation and how this influences the public perception and concern of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between culture and climate politics 
  2. How do the concepts of power, risk, uncertainty and vulnerability affect climate change policies?
  3. Discuss the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” and its influence on public concern
  4. Discuss the Giddens paradox and its four hypotheses and their impact on climate mitigation policies. 

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO2 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 02
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics, Social Inequalities, Knowledge-Ignorance Paradox, Giddens Paradox
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video (46 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/Microlecture: Culture, Heritage and Climate Change

A panel discussion organised by the Getty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council on the impact of climate change on the built environment. The lecture consists of a panel discussion that focuses on the links between climate change, preservation and future sustainability of historical buildings and modern infrastructure. The lecture also discusses how rise in temperatures, increased weather events, pollution, and frequent catastrophes can impact historical and contemporary infrastructure. The panel discusses two major themes: 

  1. What is the impact of climate change on our existing heritage and what can we do to preserve it?
  2. What is the role of cultural heritage in preserving or delaying the impact of climate change?

Through these themes, the lecture discusses the importance of finding a solution to climate change issues to ensure continued preservation of cultural heritage, history and society. 

Students will learn about the impact of climate change and global warming on the historic and modern built environment. Through examples such as termites destroying monumental buildings and homes, they will also learn about the various ways in which climate change directly impacts the natural environment and has indirect consequences on the built environment. Students will further learn the need for development to include sustainability and reuse of materials to preserve existing and future infrastructure.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact heritage structures? 
  2. How does cultural heritage help preserve or slow the impact of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change & Preserving Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Humanities,  Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCultural Studies, History, Heritage, Architecture, Built Environment, Urban Environment, Culture,, Sustainability 
Climate Topic Climate and Society 
Type of tool Video/Lecture (1 hr 36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGetty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video: Noam Chomsky on Climate Education Policy

A video lecture by Dr. Noam Chomsky on Public Policy and Climate Change Education. This video discusses legislative processes of public education related to climate change, renewable energy, and fossil fuels. It specifically discusses how, in certain cases, the notion that there is a lack of scientific consensus on climate change can be used to fuel climate denial propaganda through public education. 

Students will learn about the Public Education system in the US and the possible role of corporations in influencing curriculum. They will further learn how public perception can be influenced through climate change education policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of corporations and their influence in public education policy  in the US?
  2. How does the notion that there is a ‘lack of scientific consensus in climate science’ used in climate change denial rhetoric in the US?
  3. What is the role of public education policy in promoting the continued use of fossil fuels over renewable energy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky “Global Warming and The Common Good”
Discipline Social Sciences, Public Policy, Education
Topic(s) in Discipline Education Policy, Public Education, Education Legislation, Climate Change Education, Climate Denial
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (22 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Leigha Cohen Video Production
Hosted at Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Human Migration and Displacement

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on human migration and displacement caused by climate change. It describes the impacts of climate change on voluntary and forced human migration and displacement through examples from South Asia, the Middle East and western China.

Students will learn about the key drivers and impacts of climate change that influence migration and displacement. They will also understand the role of climate change in increasing the likelihood of regional conflict. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect migration and displacement?
  2. What are the reasons behind involuntary and voluntary migration and displacement?
  3. What are the four drivers of migration that result from climate change?
  4. What role does climate change play in the likelihood of regional conflict?

About the Tool 

Tool NameMigration and Displacement in a Changing Climate
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Migration, Displacement, Conflict, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal, South Asia, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, China 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRobert McLeman in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/12_migration-and-displacement.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Chomsky on Tackling Climate Change

An interview with Noam Chomsky on activism, organisational behaviour, power structures, privilege and propaganda related to the climate crisis. The interview includes his views on the struggles of the climate movement and strategies to tackle the issue. 

Students will learn about the climate change movement, its history and its current state. They will understand the importance of power structures in organisational behaviour for the movement. Students will further learn about political propaganda in the climate discourse. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the climate change movement.
  2. According to Chomsky, why does the climate change movement lack response?
  3. How does privilege, power and propaganda influence the climate change discourse?
  4. How does climate change affect inequality between groups?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky on Using Activism to Confront Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Sociology, Political Science, Climate Activism, Inequality, Political Propaganda
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video (23 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Kevin Caners, Interviewer- The Elephant Podcast
Hosted at The Elephant Podcast on Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/Micro lecture: Karl Marx and Climate Change

A short video titled ‘Marxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?’ by Graham Murdock, Loughborough University, that discusses the impact of capitalism on climate change. Murdock discusses Marx’s commentary on the breakdown of the relationship of humans with nature due the industrialization of agricultural practices.

Students will learn the foundations of Marx’s theory of Capitalism and its historical development and  capitalism’s influence on climate change. They will also learn about how rapid industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming. They will further learn how Marx’s analysis on ecology could also provide the solutions to problems in the context of climate change

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are Marx’s main tenets about Capitalism?
  2. What are Marx’s fundamental problems with Capitalism?
  3. Discuss how industrialization and capitalism have contributed to global warming.

About the tool

Tool NameMarxist theory: Relevant to climate change today?
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineMarxism, Marxist Theory of Capitalism, Marx, Capitalism, Political Science
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (11 mins) 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCGTN
Hosted atYouTube 
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-i242fEKyY
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Video: Naomi Klein discusses ‘This Changes Everything’

A video by award-winning journalist, author and filmmaker, Naomi Klein, at the Cambridge Forum about her book titled, ‘This Changes Everything’. In this video, Naomi Klein summarizes her book and explains why she thinks that capitalism is the real cause for climate change.

Students will learn how capitalism, specifically the ‘free-market’ ideology, has ultimately led to the current climate crisis. They will further learn, through examples and case studies, about the benefactors of the market-economy, current power structures and how they impact the political economy. They will also learn about the challenges faced to restructure the global economy and current political systems.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is capitalism?
  2. How have capitalistic policies caused climate change?
  3. What economic reforms can transform market practices?

About the Tool

Tool NameNaomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
DisciplineEconomics, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCapitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand Theory, Green Economy, Economic Policies, Economic Mergers, Atmospheric Commons
Climate TopicPolicy, Politics and Environmental Governance; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate and Society
Type of toolVideo (73 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal, USA
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNaomi Klein at the Cambridge Forum, recorded by GBH Forum Network
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8Yyd5dxTGE
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Conflict and water wars

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Climate Psychology and Psychotherapy

An audio interview by the Climate Psychology Alliance (CPA) of Paul Hoggett, Director of the Centre for Psycho- Social Studies at the University of the West of England and cofounder of CPA, and Caroline Hickman, climate psychology lecturer at University of Bath and psychotherapist, with host Verity Sharpon on climate psychology and psychotherapy. This interview discusses the importance of climate change conversations in psychotherapy and the practice of deep listening in therapy.

Students will be introduced to deep listening practices in psychotherapy such as non-judgemental listening, listening with respect and compassion, noticing the use of metaphors and imagery, noticing contradictions and silences, and asking open-ended questions. They will also be introduced to the two types of climate denials – soft denial and hard denial, and the role of ‘modelling’ in climate psychotherapy. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is climate psychology?
  2. What is ‘deep listening’ and how can it be used in psychotherapy?
  3. What are soft and hard climate denials? Discuss how to approach climate denial through psychotherapy.

About the Tool

Tool Name Podcast: What is Climate Psychology? A Way of Listening…
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Psychotherapy, Deep Listening, Climate Denial, Modelling
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of Tool Audio (45 mins)
Grade Level Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation None
Developed by Climate Psychology Alliance (hosted by Verity Sharp)
Hosted at Climate Psychology Alliance
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/ Microlecture: The Wiring of Our Brain

A video titled ‘Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall, author and founder of Climate Outreach and Information Network, that focuses on how the human brain is wired to ignore climate change even though it is such a critical problem. Marshall discusses how the human brain tends to respond to threats that are direct, visible, immediate and have a defined ‘enemy’ and how climate change impacts are none of those things. He further discusses how this creates psychological barriers that prevent future climate change action. 

Students will learn about the various psychological factors and mechanisms that cause humans to ignore climate change and its impacts. They will also learn that only when we understand what motivates, excites and threatens us, will we be able to make sense of the reality of the current climate crisis. Students will further learn why behavioural psychology is important in better understanding climate change and for climate change actions and solutions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is behavioural psychology?
  2. What are some of the psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  3. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameDon’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (55 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGeorge Marshall at Talks at Google
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video : Behavioral psychology and climate change

A video lecture that discusses behavioural psychological responses to climate change. It focuses on individual lifestyle decisions which are influenced by capitalism, technology advancement, politics, social perceptions and personal gain and benefit; and how this further affects their behavioural responses to climate change.     

Students will learn about behaviourism, consumerism and climate change. They will understand aspects of classical conditioning and behaviourism such as optimisation and rationalization and their importance in individual decision making. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss behavioural psychological responses to climate change
  2. Discuss the link between individual decision making and the seven barriers of sustainability
  3. How does classical conditioning affect individual decision making with regards to climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change: Action and Inaction
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Classical Conditioning, Optimisation, Rationalisation
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video lecture
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Dr Robert Gifford
Hosted at The Institute of International and European Affairs
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

 Cognitive Bias and Climate Change

As a teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences, you can use this teaching module to draw a link between psychological bias and climate change. 

Through this module students will learn about the ‘MPG Illusion’ and the influence cognitive biases have in altering human behaviour towards climate change. Through the quiz in this module, students will understand their own biases. Furthermore, students will learn that, as consumers, to make environmentally sustainable choices, they may have to reframe  a problem to avoid biases.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is cognitive bias?
  2. How do cognitive biases affect our perception of climate change?
  3. What is an ‘MPG Illusion’? How does it affect consumer behaviour? 
  4. When changing to a more fuel efficient vehicle, which will you choose and why? Changing from 10 MPG to 20 MPG or changing from 25 MPG to a 50 MPG?

About the Tool

Tool Name The MPG Illusion: How Cognitive Biases Increase Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Social Psychology, Climate Psychology, Cognitive Bias
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of Tool Teaching Module
Grade Level High School, Undergraduate
Location  US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Richard Larrick (Duke University)
Hosted at Action Teaching
Link Link
Access Online/Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Behavioural Psychology and Climate Change

As a teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences you can use this video to teach your students aspects of behavioral science, explain the limitations of our brains in perceiving climate change, and discuss potential behavioral science solutions to the climate crisis.

Through this video students will understand the concept of psychological distance and how that impacts individual behavior towards climate change. Students will learn about the limitations of the human mind and how effective personal, visual images can be in choosing sustainable lifestyles. Furthermore, students will learn the stages of behavioral psychology from cognitive perception to emotional relation to behavior change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is behavioral psychology?
  2. How do cognitive and psychological factors like ‘psychological distance’ influence responses to climate change?
  3. What effective measures can be taken to instigate behavioral changes at an individual level when responding to the climate crisis?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Behavioral Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Psychological Bias, Psychological Distance
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video (30 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Sabine Pahl, University of Plymouth
Hosted at PICSCanada
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Human behaviour and climate change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Video/Microlecture: Climate Psychiatry

A microlecture titled ‘Climate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health’ by Robin Cooper and Alex Trope, University of California, that discusses the impact of climate change on mental and emotional health. The microlecture includes discussions on six different aspects of climate psychiatry:

  1. Slow moving disasters, 
  2. Acute climate disasters, 
  3. Vulnerable populations, 
  4. Extreme heat effects, 
  5. Eco-distress syndromes and 
  6. Engagement and action. 

Students will learn about the health emergency of climate change. They will be introduced to the field of Climate Psychiatry and how Mental health can be impacted by disruptions associated with climate change. Students will further learn about why it is necessary to understand these disruptions in order to tackle and mitigate climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Climate Psychiatry?
  2. Discuss some impacts of climate change on mental health?
  3. How do heatwaves and other disasters affect individual and community health?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Climate Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Mental Health, Emotional Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byUniversity of California
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zpKgje9JHk
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic