Video/Microlecture: Culture, Heritage and Climate Change

A panel discussion organised by the Getty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council on the impact of climate change on the built environment. The lecture consists of a panel discussion that focuses on the links between climate change, preservation and future sustainability of historical buildings and modern infrastructure. The lecture also discusses how rise in temperatures, increased weather events, pollution, and frequent catastrophes can impact historical and contemporary infrastructure. The panel discusses two major themes: 

  1. What is the impact of climate change on our existing heritage and what can we do to preserve it?
  2. What is the role of cultural heritage in preserving or delaying the impact of climate change?

Through these themes, the lecture discusses the importance of finding a solution to climate change issues to ensure continued preservation of cultural heritage, history and society. 

Students will learn about the impact of climate change and global warming on the historic and modern built environment. Through examples such as termites destroying monumental buildings and homes, they will also learn about the various ways in which climate change directly impacts the natural environment and has indirect consequences on the built environment. Students will further learn the need for development to include sustainability and reuse of materials to preserve existing and future infrastructure.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact heritage structures? 
  2. How does cultural heritage help preserve or slow the impact of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change & Preserving Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Humanities,  Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCultural Studies, History, Heritage, Architecture, Built Environment, Urban Environment, Culture,, Sustainability 
Climate Topic Climate and Society 
Type of tool Video/Lecture (1 hr 36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGetty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video: India’s Climate Change Policies

A video lecture on India’s climate change policies and governance by Navroz Dubash, Center for Policy Research.  This video lecture is part 2 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.  The video discusses the history of India’s climate change policy. It also includes discussions on public narrative and policy frameworks through two main themes:

  1. India’s changing climate narrative: This section focuses on the history of India’s climate change policy and the change in public climate change narrative. The section discusses climate equity, 
  2. Emerging climate policy framework: This section discusses the current policy framework and stakeholders in mitigating climate change 

The lecture discusses specific climate change impacts such as decreased agricultural yields, increased rainfall, melting of glaciers and water scarcity that directly affect the economic development of India. Dubash explains India’s growing energy needs and the potential threat that climate change may have on the development of the energy sector. Additionally, the lecture discusses India’s current carbon emitting position with regards to other countries such as the U.S.A and China, creating an upper limit of emissions. The lecture also discusses the potential synergy of development and climate mitigation through the concept of “ urban co-benefits” where sectors like transport can develop to include mitigation techniques. Dubash also discusses the current institutional landscape for climate governance that starts with governing bodies such as the Ministry of Environment and Forest in 2007 and continues with the National Action Plan in 2009. Lastly, the lecture discusses the three pledges that India, as part of the Paris Agreement, has undertaken to carry out: 

  1. Decrease emission intensity by 33-35% by 2030
  2. To convert from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources by 2030
  3. Sequester 2.5-3.0 billion tons of carbon dioxide in the forest sector by 2030

Students will learn about the history of India’s climate change policies. They will also learn about the climate change narratives in India and how it has been influenced by inequity, social  impacts such as poverty and water scarcity and geopolitical drivers such as foreign policy, country alliances and global economic development. Students will further learn about the institutions and local governing bodies that influence climate change policy making. They will further learn about India’s current position within global climate mitigation initiatives and the competition of development within countries.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the history of India’s climate change policies.
  2. Discuss the change of climate change narratives in India over the last 20 years.
  3. How does the debate between development and climate change mitigation influence climate change policy making?

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO8 LO2 Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Public Policy
Topic(s) in DisciplinePublic Policy, Climate Change Policy, Governance, India Climate Change Policy
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video (36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationAsia, India 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video: COVID-19 and CO2 emissions

A webinar by Carbon Brief on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The webinar includes discussions by the following climate scientist and analysts:

  1. Corinne Le Quéré, University of East Anglia, presented that CO2 released due to human activities fell by seventeen percent by April, 2020. This temporarily brought down the emissions to the levels observed in the year 2006.
  2. Richard Betts, University of Exeter, said that while the CO2 concentrations were only eleven percent of the expected emissions for 2020, they have continued to rise and accumulate in the atmosphere.
  3. Lauri Myllyvirta, Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA), discussed his research related to emissions in China and India during the pandemic.
  4. Zeke Hausfather, director of Breakthrough Institute, discusses how 2019 might be the peak year for CO2 emissions.

Students will learn about the perspectives of various researchers and their interpretation of the CO2 concentrations recorded during the pandemic. They will also be introduced to various future predictions of emissions in different sectors, countries and under different policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the overall global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the CO2 concentrations?
  2. How does the change in CO2 concentrations impact climate change?

About the Tool

Tool NameWebinar: What impact is Covid-19 having on global CO2 emissions?
DisciplineEnvironmental Science; Economics
Topic(s) in DisciplineGreenhouse Gas Emissions, CO2 emissions, COVID-19, Environmental Economics, Atmospheric CO2, Economic Policies
Climate TopicGreenhouse Effect; Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolVideo (66 mins)
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byCarbon Brief 
Hosted atCarbon Brief Website
Linkhttps://www.carbonbrief.org/webinar-what-impact-is-covid-19-having-on-global-co2-emissions?utm_source=Web&utm_medium=contentbox&utm_campaign=Covid-box
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Historical Climatology- The Roman Empire

A video by Michael McCormick, Harvard University that discusses the link between science, history and climate change. The lecture discusses the history of Rome and Medieval Europe through the use of archaeological tools, genetics and computer science. It highlights some drastic climatic events that led to changes within the Roman Empire. Additionally, the lecture discusses the challenges that medieval societies faced in understanding, responding to, adapting to and mitigating environmental events. 

Students will learn the role of Historical Studies in understanding impacts of climate change on the Roman Empire and Medieval Europe. They will also learn about the techniques developed and used by historians and climate scientists to study historical climate from a thousand years ago. Additionally, students will learn about the major historical climate crises.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is historical climatology?
  2. Discuss the 4 phases of the climate during the Roman Empire
  3. How does history inform current climate  action?

About the tool

Tool NameConnecting Roman and Medieval Climate and Historical Change
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Historical Climatology, Archaeology, Anthropology, Roman Empire, Medieval Europe
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Lecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0PWjxs-wXI
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video: Noam Chomsky on Climate Education Policy

A video lecture by Dr. Noam Chomsky on Public Policy and Climate Change Education. This video discusses legislative processes of public education related to climate change, renewable energy, and fossil fuels. It specifically discusses how, in certain cases, the notion that there is a lack of scientific consensus on climate change can be used to fuel climate denial propaganda through public education. 

Students will learn about the Public Education system in the US and the possible role of corporations in influencing curriculum. They will further learn how public perception can be influenced through climate change education policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of corporations and their influence in public education policy  in the US?
  2. How does the notion that there is a ‘lack of scientific consensus in climate science’ used in climate change denial rhetoric in the US?
  3. What is the role of public education policy in promoting the continued use of fossil fuels over renewable energy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky “Global Warming and The Common Good”
Discipline Social Sciences, Public Policy, Education
Topic(s) in Discipline Education Policy, Public Education, Education Legislation, Climate Change Education, Climate Denial
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (22 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Leigha Cohen Video Production
Hosted at Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/Micro Lecture: A Commentary on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s The Climate of History: Four Theses

A short video commentary  by Dr Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India  on ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’ by Dipesh Chakrabarty. This video commentary summarizes Dipesh Chakrabarty’s essay on the link between history, literature and climate change. Dodd summarizes the four theses posed by Chakrabarty in his essay.   

Students will learn about the link between climate change and history of the human species and the planet. They will specifically learn about the ‘Anthropocene’ and the four theses that Dipesh Chakraborty poses to better understand the evolution of human history and the environment.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between human history and environmental history.
  2. What are the four theses posed by Dipesh Chakrabarty in his essay? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Commentary By Maya Dodd on Dipesh Chakrabarty’s ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineAnthropocene, History, Literature, Fiction, Non-fiction, Environmental Humanities 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (5 min 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, Pune, India for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU
Linkhttps://videos.files.wordpress.com/G0y5ng1D/m-dodd_video-micro-lecture_dcfourtheses_hd.mp4
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: What is Cli-Fi?

A video micro lecture by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, that discusses the genre of climate fiction (Cli-Fi). The video introduces this new genre of writing and includes definitions by contemporary artists, authors and filmmakers. This video further highlights new sub-genres such as ‘anthropocene fiction’ and ‘solar punk’ that have their origins in Cli-Fi.

Students will learn about the new genre of climate fiction in literature. They will also learn how authors, artists, and filmmakers portray the current global crisis and their challenges. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is climate fiction (Cli-Fi)? 
  2. How can Cli-Fi inform and provide solutions to help mitigate climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameWhat is Cli-Fi?
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Literature, Anthropocene Fiction, Solar Punk
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (2 mins 30 secs)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9XuxHtfOxQ
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: ‘The Great Derangement’: A conversation

A short discussion led by Dr. Maya Dodd, FLAME University, India on Amitav Ghosh’s book, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’, that summarizes key points of Ghosh’s work.This video includes discussions on topics such as

  1. Why is climate change ‘unimaginable’ or ‘unthinkable’?
  2. Why does the missing narrative of climate change require the unmasking of ‘unbelievable choices’ we have made in the past?
  3. How did the rift in narrative between the human and the non-human come about? 
  4. How has the association of nature and culture evolved historically?
  5. How does Western individualism as opposed to non-Western collective values affect climate action?
  6. Why is there a need for a more philosophical approach with the contextualization of history to deal with global climate change?

Students will learn about the complex narrative of climate change and the challenges it poses to fiction. They will also learn about how non-fiction caters to a specific demographic and, therefore, the need to include climate change in fictional works to reach a wider audience. Students will also learn about the importance of using ‘realism’ as opposed to ‘surrealism’ as a way of communicating this global crisis. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Why have climate change topics been underrepresented in fiction writing?
  2. What does Amitav Ghosh mean by ‘The Great Derangement’?
  3. How does the evolution of historical narratives influence contemporary narratives on climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Conversation on Amitav Ghosh’s ‘The Great Derangement’
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, History, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (19 min 30 sec)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byDr Maya Dodd with Paloma Chandrachud, FLAME University, India. Produced for TROP ICSU by Science Media Centre, IISER Pune
Hosted atTROP ICSU platform
Linkhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1zF2VIWoF5_yJs_zzw5XLc42TskGhImu8/view
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on Literary Fiction

Video lectures by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this set of two video lectures, Ghosh discusses the impact of global warming and climate change on fiction. He discusses climate narratives in literary fiction and the lack of climate change narratives in contemporary literature. 

Students will understand the importance of climate change narratives in literary fiction. They will also understand the influence of climate change on everyday narratives. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss climate narratives in literary fiction.
  2. Why has the climate crisis been underrepresented in literary fiction?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineLiterature, Fiction, Climate Fiction, Cli-Fi, Contemporary Literature, Literary Analysis, 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Two Video Lectures (1 hr 15 min & 1 hr 17 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago
Hosted atYouTube
LinkVideo Lecture 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW8n6RAAxTg&t=2408s
Video Lecture 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvvilBabbog 
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on the Politics of Climate Change

A video lecture by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this video lecture, Ghosh discusses the politics of climate change. 

Students will understand the importance of political narratives in climate change writing. They will also learn about the parallel evolution of political narratives and rise in carbon emissions. Students will further understand why novelists often find it difficult to integrate politics and climate change in their writing. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the politics of climate change.
  2. Why is it important to discuss the evolution of political narratives and climate change?
  3. How do political movements influence literature?

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplinePolitics, Climate Politics, Literature, Fiction
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (1 hr 15 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNoSxNTPFHU&t=8s
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Micro Lecture: Amitav Ghosh on History and Climate Change

A video lecture by Amitav Ghosh, author of ‘The Great Derangement: Fiction, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming’ as part of a 4 part lecture series delivered at the University of Chicago’s Randy L. & Melvin R. Berlin Family Lectures. In this video lecture, Ghosh discusses the link between history and climate change. The video also discusses impacts of climate change on historical narratives of capitalism and imperialism in Asia. 

Students will understand the role of climate change in shaping history. They will further understand how global warming has contributed to shaping societies in the Asian continent.   

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between climate change and history. 
  2. Discuss how climate change influenced the history of South Asia.

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Great Derangement: Literature, History, and Politics in the Age of Global Warming
DisciplineHumanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Political History, Imperialism, Colonialism,  Non-fiction, Literature, Climate Fiction
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Micro Lecture (1 hr 13 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAmitav Ghosh at the Berlin Family Lectures, The University of Chicago 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlKJ0r_2__Y&list=PLWEhymgNyZb8tuULW2lwe9AD5F8fOPKIV&index=20 
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: The Wiring of Our Brain

A video titled ‘Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall, author and founder of Climate Outreach and Information Network, that focuses on how the human brain is wired to ignore climate change even though it is such a critical problem. Marshall discusses how the human brain tends to respond to threats that are direct, visible, immediate and have a defined ‘enemy’ and how climate change impacts are none of those things. He further discusses how this creates psychological barriers that prevent future climate change action. 

Students will learn about the various psychological factors and mechanisms that cause humans to ignore climate change and its impacts. They will also learn that only when we understand what motivates, excites and threatens us, will we be able to make sense of the reality of the current climate crisis. Students will further learn why behavioural psychology is important in better understanding climate change and for climate change actions and solutions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is behavioural psychology?
  2. What are some of the psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  3. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameDon’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (55 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGeorge Marshall at Talks at Google
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Did Drought cause the Syrian Civil War?

A short video from the Yale Climate Communications series titled ‘Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change’ on climate change as a catalyst for crises. The video discusses how climate change potentially contributed to the drought in Syria causing large scale human migration, poverty, political instability and, possibly, the civil war.  

Students will learn about how global warming and rising temperatures has an effect on the natural resources of a state. They will also learn about various factors that could have caused the civil war in Syria such as large-scale migration from farmland to urban areas and the subsequent collapse of the state. Students will further learn about the implications of the civil war on global geopolitical alliances and global security. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change may have caused the drought in Syria from 2007-2010.
  2. Discuss how climate change and the drought could have contributed to the civil war in Syria.

About the tool: 

Tool NameDrought, Water, War, and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations 
Topic(s) in DisciplineInternational Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, War, Civil War, Security, Human Migration
Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards; Climate and Society; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance; Climate Change and Food Security 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (5 min 45 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale Climate Connections
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Evolutionary Adaptation in Response to Climate Change

A video microlecture that briefly describes evolutionary adaptations in animals due to climate change. This video by educator, Erin Eastwood, for TED-Ed introduces the topic of evolutionary adaptation and how animals are forced to evolve to changed environments caused by climate change. 

Students will learn how climate change has led to ecosystem disruptions and changes in the environment of many animal species. They will also be introduced to the difference between evolutionary adaptation and phenotypic plasticity and will understand the importance of heritable traits to the survival of a species. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is evolutionary adaptation? Give suitable examples.
  2. How is adaptation different from phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental change? 

About the tool

Tool NameCan wildlife adapt to climate change? – Erin Eastwood
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineEvolution, Adaptation, Evolutionary Adaptations, Natural Selection, Phenotypic Plasticity, Phenotypic Variations, Genetic Variations, Morphological Traits
Climate Topic Climate and the Biosphere
Type of tool Video/Micro lecture (5 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byErin Eastwood for TED-Ed
Hosted atYouTube, Ted-Ed
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCKRjP_DMII
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Global Warming and Sleep Deprivation

A video microlecture that discusses the potential impact of global warming on human health and sleep cycles. This video by Ryan Cross, hosted on the website of the journal Science,  describes the effects of warmer  temperatures on sleep quality in individuals in the United States. 

Students will learn how sleep is negatively affected by higher nighttime temperatures that lead to adverse impacts on human health. They will further learn how certain vulnerable groups such as the elderly and those from lower socio-economic backgrounds tend to be more severely affected.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change induced warming impact sleep cycles? 
  2. Discuss some negative impacts on individual health due to sleep deprivation. 

About the tool

Tool NameScientists warn of sleepless nights in a warming world
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Health, Sleep, Sleep Cycles, Sleep Deprivation
Climate Topic Climate and Health
Type of tool Video (3 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School
LocationGlobal, USA
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRyan Cross
Hosted atScience
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Oceans, Ocean Circulation and Sea Surface Temperatures

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland that introduces basic concepts in oceanography. This video lecture is part of a MOOC titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn basic concepts of oceanography such as trade winds, atmospheric pressure, Thermohaline circulation (THC), Walker circulation, upwelling and downwelling, Coriolis effect, and gyres amongst others. Through the use of ocean cycles and models, students will be able to chart the changes in surface temperature patterns and relate that to carbon dioxide and methane concentrations over time.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of the oceans and ocean circulation with respect to the climate of the Earth.
  2. Why is the rate of change in sea surface temperature different for the Antarctic ocean when compared to other oceans?

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L03 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 03
DisciplineEarth Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineOceanography, Ocean Circulation, Currents, Sea Surface Temperature, Thermohaline Circulation, Coriolis, Trade Winds
Climate TopicClimate and the Hydrosphere; Climate and Atmosphere,  Climate Variability Record; Long-term Cycles and Feedback Mechanisms
Type of toolVideo (44 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NCR) at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER)
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Climate Change and Human Evolution

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the impacts of climate change on human evolution and early civilizations. This video lecture is part 1 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn how climate change possibly impacted speciation, bipedalism, evolution of brain size, cultural evolution and the appearance and disappearance of certain ancient civilizations. They will also learn about the impact of various glacial and interglacial periods, East-African aridification, and changes in sea surface temperature and rainfall on human evolution and history during the Pleistocene. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How has climate change potentially impacted our evolution from apes to Homo sapiens?
  2. Explain the relationship between plate tectonics, El Nino patterns and human evolution.
  3. Discuss examples of species extinction by early human in Africa and Australia. 

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L01 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 01
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Evolution, Anthropology, Human History, Early Civilizations, Bipedalism,  East-African Aridification
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere, Climate and Biosphere, Climate Variability Record
Type of toolVideo (42 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic