Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: The Wiring of Our Brain

A video titled ‘Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall, author and founder of Climate Outreach and Information Network, that focuses on how the human brain is wired to ignore climate change even though it is such a critical problem. Marshall discusses how the human brain tends to respond to threats that are direct, visible, immediate and have a defined ‘enemy’ and how climate change impacts are none of those things. He further discusses how this creates psychological barriers that prevent future climate change action. 

Students will learn about the various psychological factors and mechanisms that cause humans to ignore climate change and its impacts. They will also learn that only when we understand what motivates, excites and threatens us, will we be able to make sense of the reality of the current climate crisis. Students will further learn why behavioural psychology is important in better understanding climate change and for climate change actions and solutions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is behavioural psychology?
  2. What are some of the psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  3. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameDon’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (55 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGeorge Marshall at Talks at Google
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Behavioural Psychology and Climate Change

As a teacher of Psychology in the Social Sciences you can use this video to teach your students aspects of behavioral science, explain the limitations of our brains in perceiving climate change, and discuss potential behavioral science solutions to the climate crisis.

Through this video students will understand the concept of psychological distance and how that impacts individual behavior towards climate change. Students will learn about the limitations of the human mind and how effective personal, visual images can be in choosing sustainable lifestyles. Furthermore, students will learn the stages of behavioral psychology from cognitive perception to emotional relation to behavior change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is behavioral psychology?
  2. How do cognitive and psychological factors like ‘psychological distance’ influence responses to climate change?
  3. What effective measures can be taken to instigate behavioral changes at an individual level when responding to the climate crisis?

About the Tool

Tool Name The Psychology of Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in Discipline Behavioral Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Psychological Bias, Psychological Distance
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of Tool Video (30 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Sabine Pahl, University of Plymouth
Hosted at PICSCanada
Link Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video/Microlecture: Climate Psychiatry

A microlecture titled ‘Climate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health’ by Robin Cooper and Alex Trope, University of California, that discusses the impact of climate change on mental and emotional health. The microlecture includes discussions on six different aspects of climate psychiatry:

  1. Slow moving disasters, 
  2. Acute climate disasters, 
  3. Vulnerable populations, 
  4. Extreme heat effects, 
  5. Eco-distress syndromes and 
  6. Engagement and action. 

Students will learn about the health emergency of climate change. They will be introduced to the field of Climate Psychiatry and how Mental health can be impacted by disruptions associated with climate change. Students will further learn about why it is necessary to understand these disruptions in order to tackle and mitigate climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Climate Psychiatry?
  2. Discuss some impacts of climate change on mental health?
  3. How do heatwaves and other disasters affect individual and community health?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Climate Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Mental Health, Emotional Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byUniversity of California
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zpKgje9JHk
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Mental Health, Physical Health, and Climate Change

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Lise Van Susteren, George Mason University, that discusses the link between climate change and mental health. The video discusses impacts of climate change on physical health such as inflamed brain tissue and mental health such as depression. The video also discusses the need to address individual and societal mental health impacts of climate change. 

Students will learn about the direct and indirect impacts of climate change on individuals and communities around the world. They will also learn about how global warming has potentially caused food and water ‘wars’, violence and distrust amongst individuals and communities. Students will further learn of how human activity has potentially contributed to global warming and the current climate crisis.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss some impacts of climate change on physical and mental health.
  2. What are some direct and indirect impacts of global warming and natural disasters on mental health?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Health, Mental Health, Violence, Conflict, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (12 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn9TlyhZBAw&list=PLE8B1470B8A846BB1&index=16
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: Mental Health Risks of Climate Change

An audio lecture from the ‘Climate Change and Health’ audio series by Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, that discusses how climate change and environmental change will impact physical and mental health and well-being. The audio also discusses the connections between mental, physical and community health. 

Students will learn about cognitive, psychological and behavioural disorders caused by climate change. They will also learn about the current and future impacts of climate change on mental well being and the urgent need to address it. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change affects aspects of mental health. 
  2. How is community health impacted by climate change? Discuss in the classroom 
  3. What are some direct and indirect mental health impacts of natural disasters caused by climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change and Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Community Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health, Climate and Society
Type of tool Audio (10 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHarvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: The Art of Storytelling

An audio conversation between storyteller and performing artist, Jo Blake and storyteller and art therapist, Sarah Deco on the relationship between mythologies and climate change narratives. This podcast focuses on how climate narratives can affect individual action and behaviour.

Students will be introduced to how ancient myths psychologically affect us as individuals and connect us to others through nature and culture. They will also learn how to use the nature of myth and storytelling to emotionally impact people to be hopeful and action-driven with reference to the current climate crisis. Additionally, they will also learn how to overcome trauma and grief caused by climate change through the use of myths, storytelling and collective experiences. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the art of storytelling and how is it used to narrate myths?
  2. Give an example of how a myth can be used as a symbolism to overcome climate change related grief and trauma?

About the Tool

Tool NameCan ancient myths help transform the narratives that led to the climate change crisis?
DisciplineHumanities, Social Science, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnglish, Storytelling, Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Myths and Mythology
Climate TopicClimate and Society; Climate Literacy
Type of toolAudio (28 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byClimate Psychology Alliance
Hosted atClimate Psychology Alliance
LinkAudio Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic