E-Learning Course: Climate Change- A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines

Two E-learning courses (MOOCs) developed by Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune on Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and Policy and Teaching Climate Change. These courses were developed through the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India. 

The courses include lectures on the current understanding of climate science and climate change, societal impacts of climate change, climate change policies and governance, and impacts of climate change. Additionally, the course includes lectures on how teachers of all disciplines can incorporate climate change in their everyday teaching.

The online course video playlist includes:

  1. Introduction to Climate Science (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  2. Climate Archives, Climate Data, and Climate Models (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  3. Climate Change: Past Records: Climate Change on Tectonic Timescales, Orbital Timescales, Glacial/Deglacial Timescales, Millennial Timescales, Historical Timescales (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  4. Modern Climate Change: Global Warming since the Industrial Revolution (Raghu Murtugudde)
  5. Future Projections of Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  6. Mitigation and Adaptation (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland and Malti Goel, Climate Change Research Institute)
  7. Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics (D. Parthasarathy, IIT Bombay)
  8. Climate Change Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making (Navroz Dubash, Centre for Policy Research)
  9. Climate Change: Impacts in India (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  10. Climate Change and Impacts on
    1. The Indian Monsoon (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
    2. Water Resources (Pradeep Mujumdar, IISc Bengaluru)
    3. Biodiversity and Ecology (Deepak Barua, IISER Pune)
    4. The Himalayan Glaciers (Argha Banerjee, IISER Pune)
  11. Teaching Resources and Pedagogical Tools (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  12. Teaching Climate Change in the Chemistry Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  13. Teaching Climate Change in the Biology Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  14. Teaching Climate Change in the Physics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  15. Teaching Climate Change in the Math and Statistics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  16. Teaching Climate Change in the Economics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  17. Teaching Climate Change in the Environmental Sciences Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  18. Teaching Climate Change in the Geography Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  19. Teaching Climate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  20. Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines 
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool E-learning Course
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byRahul Chopra (TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) for the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India
Hosted atIISER Pune Science Media Center YouTube Channel
LinkCourse 1: Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and Policy:- Link
Course 2: Climate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines:- Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: Teach Climate Science with the Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change™

A teaching module of resources and activities that accompanies ‘The Teacher-Friendly Guide™ to Climate Change’

edited by Ingrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross,the Paleontological Research Institution. This teaching module includes videos and classroom/laboratory activities on the following topics

  1. Climate Science
    1. Energy and Atmosphere
      1. Infrared energy
      2. Infrared absorption by carbon dioxide
      3. Carbon dioxide and temperature
      4. Box Model: steady state vs. non-steady state behavior
      5. Heat capacity
      6. Thermal expansion of water
    2. Carbon Cycle
      1. Diurnal variations in carbon dioxide
      2. How many molecules make a trace gas?
      3. NOAA Mauna Loa data and rate of CO2 increase
      4. Respiration
    3. Hydrologic Cycle
      1. Rainfall and river response
  1. Climate Change Mitigation
    1. Renewable Energy
      1. Solar energy
      2. Near-surface geothermal energy
      3. Wind energy
    2. Carbon Sequestration
      1. Afforestation and Reforestation: tree biomass & carbon dioxide storage
  1. Communication and Advocacy
    1. Citizen science

About the Tool 

Tool NameTeach Climate Science The Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool Teaching Module
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byIngrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross
Hosted atPaleontological Research Institution
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change- The Teacher Friendly Guide™

A reading titled ‘The Teacher Friendly Guide to Climate Change’ edited by Ingrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross,the Paleontological Research Institution. This book includes the following chapters

  1. Why Teach About Climate Change? by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Why Teaching About Climate Change Matters
    2. Science Learning, Its Application, and Politics
    3. We All Have Biases
    4. Systems and Scales
    5. Love and Beauty Will Persist
    6. Resources
  2. What Should Everyone Understand About Climate Change and Energy? by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. What Do You Think?
    2. Collecting Expert Opinions
    3. Consensus Documents
    4. Striving for a Coherent Conceptual Framework
    5. Resources
  3. What is Climate? by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Others
    1. Climate is a System
    2. Measuring Climate
    3. Greenhouse Gases and Global Temperature
    4. Natural Causes of Climate Change
    5. Summary
    6. Resources
  4. Climate Change Through Earth History by Robert M. Ross and Others
    1. Why Past Climate Change Matters
    2. Observing Climate Through Time in the Rock Record
    3. History of the Earth’s Climate
    4. Climate Analogs and Models
    5. Resources
  5. Evidence For and Causes of Recent Climate Change by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Others
    1. Changing Temperatures and Carbon Dioxide
    2. Shrinking Ice Sheets and Glaciers
    3. Changing Sea Ice Extent
    4. Thawing Permafrost
    5. Rising Sea Level
    6. Causes of Recent Climate Change
    7. What are the Likely Effects of Climate Change Going to Be?
    8. Resources
  6. 6. US Regional Climates, Current and Future by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Benjamin Brown-Steiner
    1. Describing Climates
    2. Northeast
    3. Southeast
    4. Midwest
    5. South Central
    6. Northwest Central
    7. Southwest
    8. West
    9. Hawaii
    10. Alaska
    11. Resources
  7. Climate Change Mitigation by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. What is Mitigation?
    2. Mitigation Strategies
    3. Summary
    4. Resources
  8. Geoengineering by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. Counteracting Climate Change
    2. Examples of Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) Techniques
    3. Examples of Solar Radiation Management (SRM) Techniques
    4. Geoengineering Choices
    5. Resources
  9. Climate Change Adaptation by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. How Much Does Adaptation Cost?
    2. Types of Adaptation Strategies
    3. Adatation to Different Climate Hazards
    4. Equity and Social Justice Considerations
    5. Resources
  10. Obstacles to Addressing Climate Change by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Controversial Issues and Complex Systems
    2. Creating Meaningful Dialog
    3. Factors That Influence How We think
    4. How Do People Change Their Minds?
    5. How Can We Envision New Systems?
    6. Resources
  11. Perspective by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Apocalyptic Tales of Climate Change
    2. Use of Language and Perspective in Teaching Climate Change
    3. Hope and Optimism
    4. Apocalyptic Prophesies Versus Predictions of Climate Change 
    5. Reality Check: A Personal Perspective 
    6. Science Teaching Toward a Sustainable World 
    7. Resources

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byIngrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross
Hosted atPaleontological Research Institution
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/micro lecture: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Video/Microlecture: Historical Climatology- The Roman Empire

A video by Michael McCormick, Harvard University that discusses the link between science, history and climate change. The lecture discusses the history of Rome and Medieval Europe through the use of archaeological tools, genetics and computer science. It highlights some drastic climatic events that led to changes within the Roman Empire. Additionally, the lecture discusses the challenges that medieval societies faced in understanding, responding to, adapting to and mitigating environmental events. 

Students will learn the role of Historical Studies in understanding impacts of climate change on the Roman Empire and Medieval Europe. They will also learn about the techniques developed and used by historians and climate scientists to study historical climate from a thousand years ago. Additionally, students will learn about the major historical climate crises.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is historical climatology?
  2. Discuss the 4 phases of the climate during the Roman Empire
  3. How does history inform current climate  action?

About the tool

Tool NameConnecting Roman and Medieval Climate and Historical Change
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHistory, Historical Climatology, Archaeology, Anthropology, Roman Empire, Medieval Europe
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Lecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0PWjxs-wXI
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/ Microlecture: Climate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom

A video lecture by Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune on climate change educational resources that Social Sciences teachers can use in their classrooms. These educational resources integrate climate change understanding with the core curriculum in Social Sciences. This video lecture is part of an online e-learning course (MOOC) titled ‘Climate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines’ developed  by the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.

This video lecture presents several lesson plans and teaching tools that Social Sciences teachers can use to teach topics in their discipline using climate related activities, case studies and examples. It also includes discussions on the use of digital pedagogy for effective classroom instruction. This lecture presents how Social Sciences teachers can teach topics such as Climate Refugees, Environmental Migration, Climate Justice, Climate Change and Behavior, Climate Change and Children, Food Security, Human Health and Disease among others.

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (40 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byRahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune
Hosted at​YouTube Channel of IISER Pune
LinkClimate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom :- Link
Climate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines :- Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: The Role of the Social Sciences

A video microlecture titled ‘Social Sciences Perspectives of the Earth System’ by Raghu Murtugudde of the Murtugudde Climate Academy. This microlecture is a part of a larger series of climate change videos by Murtugudde and discusses the role of Social Sciences in understanding the Earth System. It includes discussions on societal forces, pressures, changes in the environment, impacts on society, environmental degradation and human well-being through the DPSIR framework. The video also discusses concepts like ‘The Resilience Cycle’ and ‘The Panarchy Model’ to explain the relation between society and the environment. 

Students will understand the role of the Social Sciences in understanding the Earth System. They will also learn about the link between socio-ecological systems when addressing climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the link between society and the environment?
  2. Discuss the DPSIR framework.
  3. How does the Panarchy Model explain the link between society, the environment and climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool Name6 Social Science Perspective of the Earth System
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (8 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byMurtugudde Climate Academy
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Climate Change, The Humanities and Planetary Citizenship

A video microlecture by Stephanie LeMenager, Radcliffe Institute fellow (2016–2017), Harvard University titled ‘Climate Citizenship and the Humanities’. This short video discusses the role of the Humanities in understanding climate change and dealing with its impacts. It introduces the term ‘planetary citizens’ in an era of unpredictable climate futures. It further discusses issues such as climate justice, ecological scarcity, resource scarcity, globalization, and inequities.

Students will understand the importance of the Humanities in understanding climate change and its impacts. They will further understand the need to address what it means to be a planetary citizen to be able to deal with unprecedented future climate issues.

 Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Describe the term ‘planetary citizenship’.
  2. How can humanities help in dealing with climate change impacts?     

About the Tool 

Tool NameStephanie LeMenager Climate Citizenship and the Humanities Radcliffe Institute
DisciplineHumanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Planetary Citizenship 
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (2 min 20 sec)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHarvard University
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom

An article titled ‘Climate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A “Why” and “How to” Guide Using the C3 Framework’ by Lori M Kumler and Bethany Vosburg-Bluem published in the journal Social Education of the National Council for the Social Studies. This reading uses the C3 framework to discuss how climate change can be taught in Social Studies classrooms. It includes discussions on the following four dimensions of pedagogy applied to the disciplines of Civics, Economics, Geography, and History:

Dimension 1: Developing Questions and Planning Inquiries

Dimension 2: Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts

Dimension 3: Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence

Dimension 4: Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action

Students will understand the importance of the social dimensions of climate change and the importance of the social studies in understanding climate change and its impacts. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the role of the social sciences in understanding climate change?
  2. What are some social, economic, and political consequences of climate change?
  3. Discuss how climate change responsibility can be addressed.

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A “Why” and “How to” Guide Using the C3 Framework 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byLori M Kumler and Bethany Vosburg-Bluem
Hosted atSocial Education, National Council for the Social Studies
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Societal Impacts of Climate Change

A video/microlecture by The Knowledge Exchange that discusses the impacts of climate change on society. This video was excerpted from an edX course, “Making Sense of Climate Change Denial” available at https://www.edx.org/course/making-sense-of-climate-science-denial. It includes discussions by various experts on direct and immediate societal impacts of climate change and on development, production, consumption and biodiversity. The video also talks about the difference in climate change impacts for developed and developing nations. 

Students will understand the effect of climate change on present day society. They will also learn how climate change affects developing communities and nations. They will further discuss how climate change is no longer a problem for the future but one that must be dealt with immediately. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact society?
  2. How does climate change impact developing and developed nations differently?
  3. What are some of the current climate change issues?

About the Tool 

Tool NameSocietal Impacts of Climate Change 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (9 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Knowledge Exchange
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: Climate Change for Introduction to Social Sciences

A teaching module by Andrew Szasz, University of California, Santa Cruz titled ‘A Climate Change Module for Introductory Sociology Classes’ for instructors and teachers that discusses how climate change can be taught in the Sociology classroom. It provides educators with teaching resources such as videos, sample lesson plans, discussion points and sample powerpoint that educators can use in their classrooms. These resources are :-

  1. Videos
    1. The Physics of Climate Change (Jeff Kiehl, 31:59), Click Here
    2. A Sociology of Climate Change, Introduction (Andrew Szasz,  3:14), Click Here
    3. A Sociology of Climate Change, Causes (Andrew Szasz, 17:58), Click Here
    4. A Sociology of Climate Change, Impacts (Andrew Szasz, 27:45), Click Here
    5. A Sociology of Climate Change, Responses (Andrew Szasz, 26:53), Click Here
  2. Sample Lesson Plans
    1. One session option
    2. Two session option
  3. Suggestions For Classroom Instruction on
    1. Making climate change feel real
    2. When difficult feelings arise
    3. Climate denier(s) in the class
  4. Sample PowerPoints On
    1. Introduction
    2. Causes
    3. Impacts
    4. Responses

Students will understand the importance of the Social Sciences and the discipline of Sociology in understanding climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does society contribute to climate change?
  2. What are some of the impacts climate change has and may have on society?
  3. How has society responded to the threat of climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Climate Change Module for Introduction to Sociology Classes
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Teaching Module
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAndrew Szasz & Jeffrey Kiehl, University of California, Santa Cruz
Hosted atLink
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Teaching Climate Change in the Sociology Classroom

A video lecture by Andrew Szasz, University of California, Santa Cruz titled ‘A Sociology of Climate Change’ that discusses how climate change can be taught in the Sociology classroom.  This video lecture includes discussions on the following:

  1. Societal causes of climate change
    1. Causes identified in the “green” updating of Classical Theory 
    2. Causes identified in the contemporary Environmental Sociology
  2. Climate impact on society 
    1. Extreme weather events
    2. Food
    3. Water
    4. Health and Illness
    5. Economic impacts, at the level of the nation (U.S)
    6. Political impacts
    7. Unequal impacts, globally, among nations
    8. Unequal impacts, in the U.S., by State and by region
    9. Unequal impacts, in the U.S., by race and class
    10.  The potential for catastrophic impacts
  3. Societal responses to climate change
    1. The science; discovery; communicating; activism
    2. Climate activism, the social movements
    3. Climate denial, the counter-movement
    4. Private sector actors, pro and con
    5. Non-environmental “civil society” actors, pro and con
    6. Traditional media-print (newspapers), network television
    7. Online media- websites, blogs, social media
    8. Public opinion
    9. Policy- international; other nations
    10. Policy- federal (US)
    11. Policy- State, local (US)
    12. Technological innovation (clean, renewable energy); green cities
    13. “Plan B”: geoengineering

Students will understand the importance of the Social Sciences and the discipline of Sociology in understanding climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does society contribute to climate change?
  2. What are some of the impacts climate change has and may have on society?
  3. How has society responded to the threat of climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Sociology of Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (51 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAndrew Szasz
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: What is the Anthroposphere?

A short reading by the Aspen Global Change Institute that summarizes what the anthroposphere is. This resource can be used as an introduction to the topic by teachers interested in teaching about the anthroposphere and climate change.

This reading provides a definition of the Anthroposphere and overview discussions on the following topics:

  1. What is the anthroposphere?
  2. Why a separate sphere for humans?
  3. How does the anthroposphere change?

The reading also includes a short journal activity. 

Students will understand what the anthroposphere is. They will also understand about climate change and the role of the anthroposphere.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the anthroposphere?
  2. Discuss climate change and the role of the anthroposphere.

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Anthroposphere
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Humanities, Earth Sciences, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Introduction to Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAspen Global Change Institute
Hosted atAspen Global Change Institute website
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/Laboratory Activity: Climate Change and Food Security in Africa

A classroom/laboratory activity to learn about suitable climatic conditions for a crop and to determine how climate change may affect food production (specifically, cocoa production).

Audio: The Art of Storytelling

An audio conversation between storyteller and performing artist, Jo Blake and storyteller and art therapist, Sarah Deco on the relationship between mythologies and climate change narratives. This podcast focuses on how climate narratives can affect individual action and behaviour.

Students will be introduced to how ancient myths psychologically affect us as individuals and connect us to others through nature and culture. They will also learn how to use the nature of myth and storytelling to emotionally impact people to be hopeful and action-driven with reference to the current climate crisis. Additionally, they will also learn how to overcome trauma and grief caused by climate change through the use of myths, storytelling and collective experiences. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the art of storytelling and how is it used to narrate myths?
  2. Give an example of how a myth can be used as a symbolism to overcome climate change related grief and trauma?

About the Tool

Tool NameCan ancient myths help transform the narratives that led to the climate change crisis?
DisciplineHumanities, Social Science, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnglish, Storytelling, Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Myths and Mythology
Climate TopicClimate and Society; Climate Literacy
Type of toolAudio (28 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byClimate Psychology Alliance
Hosted atClimate Psychology Alliance
LinkAudio Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The climate in our hands – Ocean and Cryosphere

The Office for Climate Education (OCE) presents a Teachers Guidebook that aims to support teachers in carrying out various activities on climate change and the ocean and cryosphere in their classrooms, and targets students of ages 9 to 15.