E-Learning Course: Climate Change- A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines

Two E-learning courses (MOOCs) developed by Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune on Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and Policy and Teaching Climate Change. These courses were developed through the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India. 

The courses include lectures on the current understanding of climate science and climate change, societal impacts of climate change, climate change policies and governance, and impacts of climate change. Additionally, the course includes lectures on how teachers of all disciplines can incorporate climate change in their everyday teaching.

The online course video playlist includes:

  1. Introduction to Climate Science (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  2. Climate Archives, Climate Data, and Climate Models (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  3. Climate Change: Past Records: Climate Change on Tectonic Timescales, Orbital Timescales, Glacial/Deglacial Timescales, Millennial Timescales, Historical Timescales (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  4. Modern Climate Change: Global Warming since the Industrial Revolution (Raghu Murtugudde)
  5. Future Projections of Climate Change (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  6. Mitigation and Adaptation (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland and Malti Goel, Climate Change Research Institute)
  7. Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics (D. Parthasarathy, IIT Bombay)
  8. Climate Change Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making (Navroz Dubash, Centre for Policy Research)
  9. Climate Change: Impacts in India (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
  10. Climate Change and Impacts on
    1. The Indian Monsoon (Raghu Murtugudde, University of Maryland)
    2. Water Resources (Pradeep Mujumdar, IISc Bengaluru)
    3. Biodiversity and Ecology (Deepak Barua, IISER Pune)
    4. The Himalayan Glaciers (Argha Banerjee, IISER Pune)
  11. Teaching Resources and Pedagogical Tools (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  12. Teaching Climate Change in the Chemistry Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  13. Teaching Climate Change in the Biology Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  14. Teaching Climate Change in the Physics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  15. Teaching Climate Change in the Math and Statistics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  16. Teaching Climate Change in the Economics Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  17. Teaching Climate Change in the Environmental Sciences Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  18. Teaching Climate Change in the Geography Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  19. Teaching Climate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 
  20. Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities Classroom (Rahul Chopra, TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) 

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines 
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool E-learning Course
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byRahul Chopra (TROP ICSU and IISER Pune) for the National Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune as part of the Annual Refresher Programme in Teaching (ARPIT), Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India
Hosted atIISER Pune Science Media Center YouTube Channel
LinkCourse 1: Climate Change: Science, Impacts, and Policy:- Link
Course 2: Climate Change: A Guide For Teachers Of All Disciplines:- Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Teaching Module: Teach Climate Science with the Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change™

A teaching module of resources and activities that accompanies ‘The Teacher-Friendly Guide™ to Climate Change’

edited by Ingrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross,the Paleontological Research Institution. This teaching module includes videos and classroom/laboratory activities on the following topics

  1. Climate Science
    1. Energy and Atmosphere
      1. Infrared energy
      2. Infrared absorption by carbon dioxide
      3. Carbon dioxide and temperature
      4. Box Model: steady state vs. non-steady state behavior
      5. Heat capacity
      6. Thermal expansion of water
    2. Carbon Cycle
      1. Diurnal variations in carbon dioxide
      2. How many molecules make a trace gas?
      3. NOAA Mauna Loa data and rate of CO2 increase
      4. Respiration
    3. Hydrologic Cycle
      1. Rainfall and river response
  1. Climate Change Mitigation
    1. Renewable Energy
      1. Solar energy
      2. Near-surface geothermal energy
      3. Wind energy
    2. Carbon Sequestration
      1. Afforestation and Reforestation: tree biomass & carbon dioxide storage
  1. Communication and Advocacy
    1. Citizen science

About the Tool 

Tool NameTeach Climate Science The Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool Teaching Module
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byIngrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross
Hosted atPaleontological Research Institution
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change- The Teacher Friendly Guide™

A reading titled ‘The Teacher Friendly Guide to Climate Change’ edited by Ingrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross,the Paleontological Research Institution. This book includes the following chapters

  1. Why Teach About Climate Change? by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Why Teaching About Climate Change Matters
    2. Science Learning, Its Application, and Politics
    3. We All Have Biases
    4. Systems and Scales
    5. Love and Beauty Will Persist
    6. Resources
  2. What Should Everyone Understand About Climate Change and Energy? by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. What Do You Think?
    2. Collecting Expert Opinions
    3. Consensus Documents
    4. Striving for a Coherent Conceptual Framework
    5. Resources
  3. What is Climate? by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Others
    1. Climate is a System
    2. Measuring Climate
    3. Greenhouse Gases and Global Temperature
    4. Natural Causes of Climate Change
    5. Summary
    6. Resources
  4. Climate Change Through Earth History by Robert M. Ross and Others
    1. Why Past Climate Change Matters
    2. Observing Climate Through Time in the Rock Record
    3. History of the Earth’s Climate
    4. Climate Analogs and Models
    5. Resources
  5. Evidence For and Causes of Recent Climate Change by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Others
    1. Changing Temperatures and Carbon Dioxide
    2. Shrinking Ice Sheets and Glaciers
    3. Changing Sea Ice Extent
    4. Thawing Permafrost
    5. Rising Sea Level
    6. Causes of Recent Climate Change
    7. What are the Likely Effects of Climate Change Going to Be?
    8. Resources
  6. 6. US Regional Climates, Current and Future by Ingrid H. H. Zabel and Benjamin Brown-Steiner
    1. Describing Climates
    2. Northeast
    3. Southeast
    4. Midwest
    5. South Central
    6. Northwest Central
    7. Southwest
    8. West
    9. Hawaii
    10. Alaska
    11. Resources
  7. Climate Change Mitigation by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. What is Mitigation?
    2. Mitigation Strategies
    3. Summary
    4. Resources
  8. Geoengineering by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. Counteracting Climate Change
    2. Examples of Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) Techniques
    3. Examples of Solar Radiation Management (SRM) Techniques
    4. Geoengineering Choices
    5. Resources
  9. Climate Change Adaptation by Ingrid H. H. Zabel
    1. How Much Does Adaptation Cost?
    2. Types of Adaptation Strategies
    3. Adatation to Different Climate Hazards
    4. Equity and Social Justice Considerations
    5. Resources
  10. Obstacles to Addressing Climate Change by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Controversial Issues and Complex Systems
    2. Creating Meaningful Dialog
    3. Factors That Influence How We think
    4. How Do People Change Their Minds?
    5. How Can We Envision New Systems?
    6. Resources
  11. Perspective by Don Duggan-Haas
    1. Apocalyptic Tales of Climate Change
    2. Use of Language and Perspective in Teaching Climate Change
    3. Hope and Optimism
    4. Apocalyptic Prophesies Versus Predictions of Climate Change 
    5. Reality Check: A Personal Perspective 
    6. Science Teaching Toward a Sustainable World 
    7. Resources

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Teacher Friendly Guide To Climate Change
DisciplineEarth Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geography, Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics, Mathematics and Statistics, Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Introduction to Climate Change; Climate Literacy
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byIngrid H. H. Zabel, Don Duggan-Haas, & Robert M. Ross
Hosted atPaleontological Research Institution
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: The Role of the Social Sciences

A video microlecture titled ‘Social Sciences Perspectives of the Earth System’ by Raghu Murtugudde of the Murtugudde Climate Academy. This microlecture is a part of a larger series of climate change videos by Murtugudde and discusses the role of Social Sciences in understanding the Earth System. It includes discussions on societal forces, pressures, changes in the environment, impacts on society, environmental degradation and human well-being through the DPSIR framework. The video also discusses concepts like ‘The Resilience Cycle’ and ‘The Panarchy Model’ to explain the relation between society and the environment. 

Students will understand the role of the Social Sciences in understanding the Earth System. They will also learn about the link between socio-ecological systems when addressing climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the link between society and the environment?
  2. Discuss the DPSIR framework.
  3. How does the Panarchy Model explain the link between society, the environment and climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool Name6 Social Science Perspective of the Earth System
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (8 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byMurtugudde Climate Academy
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change in the Social Sciences Classroom

An article titled ‘Climate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A “Why” and “How to” Guide Using the C3 Framework’ by Lori M Kumler and Bethany Vosburg-Bluem published in the journal Social Education of the National Council for the Social Studies. This reading uses the C3 framework to discuss how climate change can be taught in Social Studies classrooms. It includes discussions on the following four dimensions of pedagogy applied to the disciplines of Civics, Economics, Geography, and History:

Dimension 1: Developing Questions and Planning Inquiries

Dimension 2: Applying Disciplinary Tools and Concepts

Dimension 3: Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence

Dimension 4: Communicating Conclusions and Taking Informed Action

Students will understand the importance of the social dimensions of climate change and the importance of the social studies in understanding climate change and its impacts. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is the role of the social sciences in understanding climate change?
  2. What are some social, economic, and political consequences of climate change?
  3. Discuss how climate change responsibility can be addressed.

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate Change in the Social Studies Classroom: A “Why” and “How to” Guide Using the C3 Framework 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byLori M Kumler and Bethany Vosburg-Bluem
Hosted atSocial Education, National Council for the Social Studies
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Video/Microlecture: Societal Impacts of Climate Change

A video/microlecture by The Knowledge Exchange that discusses the impacts of climate change on society. This video was excerpted from an edX course, “Making Sense of Climate Change Denial” available at https://www.edx.org/course/making-sense-of-climate-science-denial. It includes discussions by various experts on direct and immediate societal impacts of climate change and on development, production, consumption and biodiversity. The video also talks about the difference in climate change impacts for developed and developing nations. 

Students will understand the effect of climate change on present day society. They will also learn how climate change affects developing communities and nations. They will further discuss how climate change is no longer a problem for the future but one that must be dealt with immediately. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact society?
  2. How does climate change impact developing and developed nations differently?
  3. What are some of the current climate change issues?

About the Tool 

Tool NameSocietal Impacts of Climate Change 
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (9 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Knowledge Exchange
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: International Climate Change Policy

A video lecture that discusses international climate change policy and governance by Navroz Dubash, Center for Policy Research. This video lecture is part 1 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India. 

 The lecture includes four main discussion sections:

  1. Understanding climate change science: This section discusses the basics of climate science and focuses on two main questions- “why is climate change a problem?” and “how does climate science shape climate politics and policy?” 
  2. Challenges of tackling climate change: This section largely focuses on why climate change is a difficult issue for countries to tackle.
  3. History of climate change negotiations: This section discusses the various climate change negotiations that have taken place over the last 20 years and a structure for future international negotiations and policies.
  4. The Paris Agreement of 2015: This section discusses the 2015 international climate change agreement.

Through the use of global and regional data, the lecture discusses global warming and international agreements and treaties. The lecture discusses the concept of “zero-sum allocation” which highlights the finite nature of carbon dioxide that can be emitted into the atmosphere. Here, Dubash poses the question of “who gets to emit this carbon?”. Through the use of the example of air pollution, he also highlights the concept of “positive-sum approach” that discusses the possibility of increasing development as well as reducing carbon emissions. The lecture then discusses how countries believe that climate change is a  “zero-sum” problem that would negatively impact economic development and often leads to reduced responsibility for their climate actions. Dubash discusses how this may influence economic and foreign policy. The lecture also discusses the term “polycentric governance” that describes the climate problem as a net problem of actions and choices by individuals, communities,  corporations, cities, states and countries, where mitigation would involve understanding the root of those choices. The video describes the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992), The Kyoto Protocol ( 1997), the Copenhagen Climate Convention (2009) and the Paris Agreement (2015) and their implications on geopolitical alliances, competition between countries, global development and international negotiations. 

Students will be introduced to the history, frameworks and challenges of international climate change policy and governance. They will also learn about the implications and debates about concepts such as “zero-sum allocation” and “positive-sum approach” on a regional and national level. Students will further learn how the various international climate change agreements have shaped geopolitical alliances, global development, foreign policy and the overall global climate context. They will also learn about the negotiations that developed and developing countries have put forth to ensure maximisation of their economies without compromising on development. Additionally, students will learn about the need to understand the fundamentals of climate change science to ensure efficient policy and decision making.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the history of international climate change negotiations. 
  2. Discuss and debate the issue of development versus mitigation in the context of climate change

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO8 LO1 Climate Change: Policy and Governance: Global Negotiations and Domestic Policy Making
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Public Policy, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplinePublic Policy, Climate Policy, International Studies, Governance, Paris Agreement, Development, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992), The Kyoto Protocol ( 1997), Copenhagen Climate Convention (2009), Paris Agreement (2015)
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance, Energy, Economics and Climate Change  
Type of tool Video (48 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeHcsCCXUw0&list=PLZbgNdSTyWDbHe1onWK9SULbPxCuAMi1Z&index=47
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/Microlecture: Teaching Climate Change in the Sociology Classroom

A video lecture by Andrew Szasz, University of California, Santa Cruz titled ‘A Sociology of Climate Change’ that discusses how climate change can be taught in the Sociology classroom.  This video lecture includes discussions on the following:

  1. Societal causes of climate change
    1. Causes identified in the “green” updating of Classical Theory 
    2. Causes identified in the contemporary Environmental Sociology
  2. Climate impact on society 
    1. Extreme weather events
    2. Food
    3. Water
    4. Health and Illness
    5. Economic impacts, at the level of the nation (U.S)
    6. Political impacts
    7. Unequal impacts, globally, among nations
    8. Unequal impacts, in the U.S., by State and by region
    9. Unequal impacts, in the U.S., by race and class
    10.  The potential for catastrophic impacts
  3. Societal responses to climate change
    1. The science; discovery; communicating; activism
    2. Climate activism, the social movements
    3. Climate denial, the counter-movement
    4. Private sector actors, pro and con
    5. Non-environmental “civil society” actors, pro and con
    6. Traditional media-print (newspapers), network television
    7. Online media- websites, blogs, social media
    8. Public opinion
    9. Policy- international; other nations
    10. Policy- federal (US)
    11. Policy- State, local (US)
    12. Technological innovation (clean, renewable energy); green cities
    13. “Plan B”: geoengineering

Students will understand the importance of the Social Sciences and the discipline of Sociology in understanding climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does society contribute to climate change?
  2. What are some of the impacts climate change has and may have on society?
  3. How has society responded to the threat of climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Sociology of Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (51 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAndrew Szasz
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Climate Change and Society

A video lecture that discusses how the social sciences have evolved to address issues of climate change by D. Parthasarathy. This video lecture is part 1 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.  The lecture focuses on the threat and vulnerability of the human population to climate change viewed through the lenses of the social sciences and climate sciences. This lecture discusses how social vulnerability is understood in the social sciences as “vulnerability and adaptation as representing the set of socio-economic factors that determine people’s ability to cope with stress or change” and how it is understood in the climate sciences as “vulnerability is the likelihood of occurrence and impacts of weather and climate related events, and capacity of population groups to reduce vulnerability”. 

The video further discusses how the social sciences have contributed to the understanding of vulnerability by discussing concepts of social inequalities like caste, religion and social status. It also highlights the impact of climate change in developing countries.  Additionally, the lecture discusses the need for a transdisciplinary approach and how the social sciences can further contribute to the understanding of climate change and societal impacts. These include:  

  1. Ethnographic insights: Studies that could discuss cultural values and political relations that influence climate related knowledge and the perception of climate change. This could help formulate better adaptation policies
  2. Historical perspective: History can be used to understand traditional mechanisms of adapting and coping and understanding societal collapse, survival and sustainability. 
  3. Holistic view: Studies that discuss the changing forms of consumption and production and their consequences such as migration and refugee crises. 

Students will learn about understanding climate risk and vulnerability from the perspective of the social sciences. They will also learn about climate change threats and vulnerability and social inequalities such as  caste, religion and social status. Students will further learn about how culture influences societies to adapt, survive, and mitigate the risks of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the role of the social sciences in understanding climate change risks and vulnerability 
  2. Discuss the social inequalities can contribute to climate change induced vulnerability in developing countries

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO1 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 01
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Inequalities, Caste, Religion, Vulnerability, Culture
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance  
Type of tool Video (52 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research , Pune, India
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/ Microlecture: Culture, Politics and Climate Change

A video lecture that discusses the link between politics, culture and climate change by D. Parthasarthy. This video lecture is part 2 of a 2-part lecture  series titled ‘Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics’ of a MOOC. This MOOC has been developed by the National Resource Center on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India. The video discusses the politics of climate change, its origin and how it has evolved over time. It further discusses the unequal impacts of climate change on societies, the problem of accountability and responsibility by countries and the ongoing debate between economic development and mitigation of climate change. It discusses the concepts of power of stakeholders, their decision making, societal vulnerability and risk. The video also discusses the current lack of representation in policy making by communities that are directly affected by climate change and hence the need for “knowledge participation”. The lecture further highlights the “social limits to climate action” that includes values, ethics, knowledge and culture which determine climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. The lecture specifically discusses four propositions to understand climate change and culture:

  1. Values and ethics are central to politics where social units are based on ethical principles
  2. Uncertainty leads to failure to adapt and increases vulnerability for certain communities
  3. There is a gap between perception of risk and action 
  4. Cultural aspects are excluded when developing climate adaptation strategies

The lecture then highlights how culture defines the politics of climate change contributing to the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” which discusses the concept of “scientific illiteracy”. D Parthasarathy further discusses the Giddens paradox that highlights the four reasons for decreasing public concern about climate change:

  1. Political campaigns by corporate organizations against policy proposals to reduce carbon emissions
  2. The abstract and vague nature of climate science for a layman to understand
  3. The ‘free-rider’ issue where the impact of climate change affects other countries rather than the country of origin, enabling no action to be taken to control it. 
  4. The debate between economic development and climate change mitigation in developing countries like India.  

The lecture also provides four suggestions put forth by Giddens to tackle these issues: 

  1. Political leaders must be convinced to take action 
  2. Small regional climate change agreements must be made instead of international agreements where accountability and responsibility are hard to monitor. 
  3. Companies that use fossil fuels must be challenged by local companies 
  4. Promotion of local activism to influence global action

Students will learn about the politics of climate change. They will learn about the existing politics of climate change and how vulnerability, risk and uncertainty affects decision making by individuals and societies. Students will further learn about the inherent presence of societal values, ethics, vulnerability, power and risk that determine societal ignorance, knowledge and perception of climate change. Through the four propositions, they will learn about the need for a transdisciplinary approach to ensure effective adaptation and mitigation strategies. Additionally, students will learn about the “knowledge-ignorance paradox’, the Giddens paradox and media representation and how this influences the public perception and concern of climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the link between culture and climate politics 
  2. How do the concepts of power, risk, uncertainty and vulnerability affect climate change policies?
  3. Discuss the “knowledge-ignorance paradox” and its influence on public concern
  4. Discuss the Giddens paradox and its four hypotheses and their impact on climate mitigation policies. 

About the tool

Tool NameW10 CO7 LO2 Climate Change and Society: Culture, Politics, And Social Dynamics Lecture 02
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview, Culture, Politics, Social Dynamics, Social Inequalities, Knowledge-Ignorance Paradox, Giddens Paradox
Climate Topic Climate Literacy, Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Video (46 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byIndian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Video/micro lecture: Introduction to Gender and Climate Change

A video lecture by Vibhuti Patel, SNDT Women’s University, India, titled ‘Gender and Climate Change’ that discusses gender dimensions of climate change. This lecture discusses the role of women in households and how climate change induced events such as natural and manmade disasters, water and food shortages and deforestation differentially impact them. Additionally, the lecture discusses examples of indigenous tribes and local knowledge systems. The lecture further discusses the current role of women in the climate change discourse, women’s ecological movements, and the need to include women in decision and policy making.  

Students will learn about the impacts of climate change on women. They will also learn about how women are far more vulnerable to climatic events and hence the need to ensure that women are included in climate policy and decision making. Students will further learn a brief history of women’s ecological movements in India and the current role women play in reducing the impacts of climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of climate change.
  2. Discuss the symbiotic relationship of indigenous women and the natural environment. 
  3. Discuss the women’s ecological movement in India. 

About the tool

Tool NameGender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Women Studies, Women’s Ecological Movement 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Video/Microlecture (33 min)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byVidya-Mitra Channel by National Mission on Education through Information and Communication Technology, MHRD, India
Hosted atYouTube 
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Teaching Module: Climate Change for Introduction to Social Sciences

A teaching module by Andrew Szasz, University of California, Santa Cruz titled ‘A Climate Change Module for Introductory Sociology Classes’ for instructors and teachers that discusses how climate change can be taught in the Sociology classroom. It provides educators with teaching resources such as videos, sample lesson plans, discussion points and sample powerpoint that educators can use in their classrooms. These resources are :-

  1. Videos
    1. The Physics of Climate Change (Jeff Kiehl, 31:59), Click Here
    2. A Sociology of Climate Change, Introduction (Andrew Szasz,  3:14), Click Here
    3. A Sociology of Climate Change, Causes (Andrew Szasz, 17:58), Click Here
    4. A Sociology of Climate Change, Impacts (Andrew Szasz, 27:45), Click Here
    5. A Sociology of Climate Change, Responses (Andrew Szasz, 26:53), Click Here
  2. Sample Lesson Plans
    1. One session option
    2. Two session option
  3. Suggestions For Classroom Instruction on
    1. Making climate change feel real
    2. When difficult feelings arise
    3. Climate denier(s) in the class
  4. Sample PowerPoints On
    1. Introduction
    2. Causes
    3. Impacts
    4. Responses

Students will understand the importance of the Social Sciences and the discipline of Sociology in understanding climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does society contribute to climate change?
  2. What are some of the impacts climate change has and may have on society?
  3. How has society responded to the threat of climate change?

About the Tool 

Tool NameA Climate Change Module for Introduction to Sociology Classes
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Climate and Society
Type of tool Teaching Module
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAndrew Szasz & Jeffrey Kiehl, University of California, Santa Cruz
Hosted atLink
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Culture, Heritage and Climate Change

A panel discussion organised by the Getty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council on the impact of climate change on the built environment. The lecture consists of a panel discussion that focuses on the links between climate change, preservation and future sustainability of historical buildings and modern infrastructure. The lecture also discusses how rise in temperatures, increased weather events, pollution, and frequent catastrophes can impact historical and contemporary infrastructure. The panel discusses two major themes: 

  1. What is the impact of climate change on our existing heritage and what can we do to preserve it?
  2. What is the role of cultural heritage in preserving or delaying the impact of climate change?

Through these themes, the lecture discusses the importance of finding a solution to climate change issues to ensure continued preservation of cultural heritage, history and society. 

Students will learn about the impact of climate change and global warming on the historic and modern built environment. Through examples such as termites destroying monumental buildings and homes, they will also learn about the various ways in which climate change directly impacts the natural environment and has indirect consequences on the built environment. Students will further learn the need for development to include sustainability and reuse of materials to preserve existing and future infrastructure.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact heritage structures? 
  2. How does cultural heritage help preserve or slow the impact of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameClimate Change & Preserving Cultural Heritage in the 21st Century
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Humanities,  Environmental Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineCultural Studies, History, Heritage, Architecture, Built Environment, Urban Environment, Culture,, Sustainability 
Climate Topic Climate and Society 
Type of tool Video/Lecture (1 hr 36 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGetty Conservation Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: What is the Anthroposphere?

A short reading by the Aspen Global Change Institute that summarizes what the anthroposphere is. This resource can be used as an introduction to the topic by teachers interested in teaching about the anthroposphere and climate change.

This reading provides a definition of the Anthroposphere and overview discussions on the following topics:

  1. What is the anthroposphere?
  2. Why a separate sphere for humans?
  3. How does the anthroposphere change?

The reading also includes a short journal activity. 

Students will understand what the anthroposphere is. They will also understand about climate change and the role of the anthroposphere.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the anthroposphere?
  2. Discuss climate change and the role of the anthroposphere.

About the Tool 

Tool NameThe Anthroposphere
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Humanities, Earth Sciences, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Change Overview
Climate Topic Climate Literacy; Introduction to Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelMiddle School, High School
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAspen Global Change Institute
Hosted atAspen Global Change Institute website
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Noam Chomsky on Climate Education Policy

A video lecture by Dr. Noam Chomsky on Public Policy and Climate Change Education. This video discusses legislative processes of public education related to climate change, renewable energy, and fossil fuels. It specifically discusses how, in certain cases, the notion that there is a lack of scientific consensus on climate change can be used to fuel climate denial propaganda through public education. 

Students will learn about the Public Education system in the US and the possible role of corporations in influencing curriculum. They will further learn how public perception can be influenced through climate change education policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of corporations and their influence in public education policy  in the US?
  2. How does the notion that there is a ‘lack of scientific consensus in climate science’ used in climate change denial rhetoric in the US?
  3. What is the role of public education policy in promoting the continued use of fossil fuels over renewable energy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky “Global Warming and The Common Good”
Discipline Social Sciences, Public Policy, Education
Topic(s) in Discipline Education Policy, Public Education, Education Legislation, Climate Change Education, Climate Denial
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (22 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Leigha Cohen Video Production
Hosted at Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Population Demographics In A Warming World

A short reading by the Population Reference Bureau on climate change impacts and population demographics. This reading discusses potential climate change impacts on human communities with respect to changes in size and distribution of the global population. It also includes discussions on urbanization and population growth in developing countries and population trends like aging. 

Students will learn about projected population trends and impacts of climate change on human communities globally. They will also understand the link between urbanization, demographic changes and global warming. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the impacts of climate change on human communities.
  2. “Urbanization, aging, and growth in less developed countries.. are likely to increase humanity’s vulnerability to climate change” Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change Impacts and Emerging Population Trends: A Recipe for Disaster 
DisciplineSocial Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDemography, Population Demographics, Population Growth, Urbanization, Aging 
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byBingham Kennedy Jr., Population Reference Bureau 
Hosted atPopulation Reference Bureau Website
Linkhttps://www.prb.org/resources/climate-change-impacts-emerging-population-trends-disaster/
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic