Reading: Coffee Production and Food Security

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security that discusses the impact of climate change on crop security. The reading specifically discusses the impacts of climate change on coffee production in different parts of the world. It further lists countries that primarily rely on coffee export for economic sustainability and related security issues. 

Students will understand the impacts of climate change on food security. They will also learn how climate-sensitive crops such as coffee relate to economic and political stability in some parts of the world.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact food security?
  2. What is the impact of climate change on coffee production?
  3. Discuss the impact of climate change on coffee production and security in Honduras and Uganda.

About the Tool 

Tool NameClimate, Coffee and Security
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineFood Security, Security, Coffee, Peace and Conflict Studies 
Climate Topic Climate and Agriculture; Climate Change and Food Security
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, South America, Africa, Central America, Honduras, Uganda 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byShiloh Fetzek in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/11_the-coffee-belt.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Risk and Megacities

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on the impacts of climate change on large urban cities.The reading describes risks and direct and indirect impacts of climate change on the security of urban cities specifically coastal megacities.

Students will understand the impacts of climate change on urban megacities including large coastal agglomerates. They will also learn about the fragility and resilience of cities vulnerable to security risks caused by climate change.They will further understand related security, environmental, human rights and governance issues and policies.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change impact urban coastal cities? 
  2. How does climate change cause human migration and displacement? Give examples.
  3. Does migration to megacities create instability and conflict? 

About the Tool 

Tool NameCoastal Megacities vs. The Sea: Climate and Security in Urban Spaces
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineUrban Environment, Development Studies, Urbanization, Human Migration, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byJanani Vivekananda and Neil Bhatiya in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/7_coastal-megacities.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Human Migration and Displacement

A reading from ‘The Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene’ by The Center for Climate and Security on human migration and displacement caused by climate change. It describes the impacts of climate change on voluntary and forced human migration and displacement through examples from South Asia, the Middle East and western China.

Students will learn about the key drivers and impacts of climate change that influence migration and displacement. They will also understand the role of climate change in increasing the likelihood of regional conflict. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect migration and displacement?
  2. What are the reasons behind involuntary and voluntary migration and displacement?
  3. What are the four drivers of migration that result from climate change?
  4. What role does climate change play in the likelihood of regional conflict?

About the Tool 

Tool NameMigration and Displacement in a Changing Climate
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Migration, Displacement, Conflict, Security, Peace and Conflict Studies
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh school, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal, South Asia, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, China 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRobert McLeman in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
Linkhttps://climateandsecurity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/12_migration-and-displacement.pdf 
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Food Insecurity in Somalia

A video titled ‘Locust swarm threatens Somalia food crisis’ by AP Archive that discusses the threat of the recent desert locust outbreak to Somalia’s food and crop production. The video also discusses how the rapid maturing of the desert locust may lead to mass breeding and result in further migration to other regions of Africa. The video highlights the fact that since Somalia may already be vulnerable, the locust outbreak could cause additional stress  and cause food insecurity. 

Students will learn about the link between climate change, changing weather patterns, desert locusts breeding and migration, and food insecurity in Somalia. They will also learn about potential strategies to prevent future outbreaks. Students will further understand the need for international cooperation to tackle the situation. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the impact of the desert locusts outbreak on agriculture and food security in Somalia.
  2. How has climate change caused changes  in weather patterns in Somalia? 

About the tool: 

Tool NameLocust swarm threatens Somalia food crisis
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Agricultural Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Agriculture
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture
Type of tool Video (5 mins 15 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Somalia
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byAP Archive 
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aoclw68b0mM
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Mental Health, Physical Health, and Climate Change

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Lise Van Susteren, George Mason University, that discusses the link between climate change and mental health. The video discusses impacts of climate change on physical health such as inflamed brain tissue and mental health such as depression. The video also discusses the need to address individual and societal mental health impacts of climate change. 

Students will learn about the direct and indirect impacts of climate change on individuals and communities around the world. They will also learn about how global warming has potentially caused food and water ‘wars’, violence and distrust amongst individuals and communities. Students will further learn of how human activity has potentially contributed to global warming and the current climate crisis.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss some impacts of climate change on physical and mental health.
  2. What are some direct and indirect impacts of global warming and natural disasters on mental health?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Health, Mental Health, Violence, Conflict, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (12 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn9TlyhZBAw&list=PLE8B1470B8A846BB1&index=16
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Climate Psychiatry

A microlecture titled ‘Climate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health’ by Robin Cooper and Alex Trope, University of California, that discusses the impact of climate change on mental and emotional health. The microlecture includes discussions on six different aspects of climate psychiatry:

  1. Slow moving disasters, 
  2. Acute climate disasters, 
  3. Vulnerable populations, 
  4. Extreme heat effects, 
  5. Eco-distress syndromes and 
  6. Engagement and action. 

Students will learn about the health emergency of climate change. They will be introduced to the field of Climate Psychiatry and how Mental health can be impacted by disruptions associated with climate change. Students will further learn about why it is necessary to understand these disruptions in order to tackle and mitigate climate change. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is Climate Psychiatry?
  2. Discuss some impacts of climate change on mental health?
  3. How do heatwaves and other disasters affect individual and community health?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Psychiatry: The Diverse Challenges of Climate Change to Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Climate Psychiatry, Psychiatry, Mental Health, Emotional Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (1 hr)
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byUniversity of California
Hosted atYouTube
Linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zpKgje9JHk
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video: Noam Chomsky on Climate Education Policy

A video lecture by Dr. Noam Chomsky on Public Policy and Climate Change Education. This video discusses legislative processes of public education related to climate change, renewable energy, and fossil fuels. It specifically discusses how, in certain cases, the notion that there is a lack of scientific consensus on climate change can be used to fuel climate denial propaganda through public education. 

Students will learn about the Public Education system in the US and the possible role of corporations in influencing curriculum. They will further learn how public perception can be influenced through climate change education policies. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the role of corporations and their influence in public education policy  in the US?
  2. How does the notion that there is a ‘lack of scientific consensus in climate science’ used in climate change denial rhetoric in the US?
  3. What is the role of public education policy in promoting the continued use of fossil fuels over renewable energy?

About the Tool

Tool Name Noam Chomsky “Global Warming and The Common Good”
Discipline Social Sciences, Public Policy, Education
Topic(s) in Discipline Education Policy, Public Education, Education Legislation, Climate Change Education, Climate Denial
Climate Topic Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (22 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location US
Language English
Translation
Developed by Leigha Cohen Video Production
Hosted at Youtube
Link Video Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Audio: Mental Health Risks of Climate Change

An audio lecture from the ‘Climate Change and Health’ audio series by Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, that discusses how climate change and environmental change will impact physical and mental health and well-being. The audio also discusses the connections between mental, physical and community health. 

Students will learn about cognitive, psychological and behavioural disorders caused by climate change. They will also learn about the current and future impacts of climate change on mental well being and the urgent need to address it. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change affects aspects of mental health. 
  2. How is community health impacted by climate change? Discuss in the classroom 
  3. What are some direct and indirect mental health impacts of natural disasters caused by climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change and Mental Health
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Community Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health, Climate and Society
Type of tool Audio (10 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byHarvard T.H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Multi-level Impacts of Climate Change on Mental Health

A video titled ‘Mental Health Issues and Climate Change’ by Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, that discusses the impacts of climate change on mental health. The video focuses on why it is necessary to understand and identify the impacts on mental well being  in order to better plan, adapt to and mitigate climate change. The video discusses different mental disorders such as stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief, chronic psychological dysfunction and depression.  

Students will learn about how climate change impacts can affect mental well-being. They will also learn about multi-level impacts, such as direct, indirect, acute, and gradual, on mental health and why it is essential to identify these to tackle this global issue. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are some consequences of climate change on mental health and well-being?
  2. What are some direct and indirect mental health consequences of the impacts of global warming and natural disasters?
  3. How do people adapt to and cope with the threats of climate change?

About the tool: 

Tool NameMental Health Issues and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Mental Health, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stress, Anxiety
Climate Topic Climate and Health; Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (27 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCenter for Climate Change Communication (George Mason University)
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: The Locust Plague of East Africa

An article titled ‘A plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame’ by Madeleine Stone in the National Geographic that discusses the relationship between the 2019-20 desert locust swarms in East Africa and climate change. The article focuses on how rising sea surface temperatures, storms and cyclones, changing ocean circulation patterns caused by human activity may have triggered this trans-oceanic disaster and destruction of food supply. 

Students will learn about how climate change triggered the mass migration of the desert locusts over East Africa. They will also learn about the unseasonal cyclones and storms that led to unusual locust breeding that resulted in the widespread destruction of crops and disrupted the food chain in East Africa. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are desert locusts?
  2. Is climate change responsible for the current locust outbreak in East Africa? Discuss.
  3. How is the locust plague causing food insecurity in some countries?

About the tool: 

Tool NameA plague of locusts has descended on East Africa. Climate change may be to blame
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineLocust Plague, Desert Locust, Food Security, Species Migration, Agriculture 
Climate Topic Climate Change and Food Security; Climate and Agriculture 
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationAfrica, East Africa, Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byMadeleine Stone
Hosted atNational Geographic
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: The Wiring of Our Brain

A video titled ‘Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change’ by George Marshall, author and founder of Climate Outreach and Information Network, that focuses on how the human brain is wired to ignore climate change even though it is such a critical problem. Marshall discusses how the human brain tends to respond to threats that are direct, visible, immediate and have a defined ‘enemy’ and how climate change impacts are none of those things. He further discusses how this creates psychological barriers that prevent future climate change action. 

Students will learn about the various psychological factors and mechanisms that cause humans to ignore climate change and its impacts. They will also learn that only when we understand what motivates, excites and threatens us, will we be able to make sense of the reality of the current climate crisis. Students will further learn why behavioural psychology is important in better understanding climate change and for climate change actions and solutions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is behavioural psychology?
  2. What are some of the psychological barriers that prevent sustained climate action?
  3. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameDon’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Discipline Social Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (55 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGeorge Marshall at Talks at Google
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlecture: Human Cognition and Climate Denial

A video titled ‘Cognition of Climate Change Denial’ by Stephen Lewandowsky, University of Western Australia, that explains how human cognition processes and responds to climate change. The video discusses different psychological and cognitive factors, perceptions, attitudes, and individual political beliefs that influence the way people address the issue of climate change.

Students will learn about different psychological factors that influence society to either accept or deny climate change. Using climate science data, they will also learn about how capitalism and politics can influence mass opinions on who could be responsible for contributing to global warming. Students will further learn how opinions, attitudes and perceptions can change the way society addresses, reacts, mitigates and adapts to climate change.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What cognitive and psychological factors influence climate change responses?
  2. How can behavioural science provide solutions to the climate crisis?

About the tool: 

Tool NameCognition of Climate Change Denial 
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineClimate Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Behavioral Psychology, Climate Change Denial, Capitalism 
Climate Topic Climate and Society
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (22 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate  
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byStephen Lewandowsky at the University of Sydney
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/ Microlectures: Droughts, Deforestation, Religion, and War

A video titled ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously’ – a documentary television series on global warming and impacts on the state, society and natural resources. This video includes segments on droughts in the Southwest United States (reported by Don Cheadle), religion and climate change (reported by Katharine Hayhoe), deforestation in Indonesia (reported by Harrison Ford), and how drought may have contributed to the civil war in Syria (reported by Thomas Friedman of the New York Times). 

Students will learn about the impacts of global warming in different parts of the world. They will also learn about how climate change could have been a contributing factor in conflict and wars. Students will further learn of the impacts of rising temperatures, increased carbon emissions and destruction of the environment on the security of a region.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change  could have potentially contributed to 
  1. Droughts in the USA 
  2. The Syrian Civil war
  3. Can religion play a significant role in climate mitigation? Discuss in the classroom.

About the tool: 

Tool NameYears of Living Dangerously
DisciplineEnvironmental Sciences, Social Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDroughts, Deforestation, Conflict, War, Religion, Geopolitics, Human Migration
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (59 min)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEpisode ‘Dry Season’ from  the Showtime series ‘Years of Living Dangerously by The YEARS Project 
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video/Microlecture: Did Drought cause the Syrian Civil War?

A short video from the Yale Climate Communications series titled ‘Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change’ on climate change as a catalyst for crises. The video discusses how climate change potentially contributed to the drought in Syria causing large scale human migration, poverty, political instability and, possibly, the civil war.  

Students will learn about how global warming and rising temperatures has an effect on the natural resources of a state. They will also learn about various factors that could have caused the civil war in Syria such as large-scale migration from farmland to urban areas and the subsequent collapse of the state. Students will further learn about the implications of the civil war on global geopolitical alliances and global security. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change may have caused the drought in Syria from 2007-2010.
  2. Discuss how climate change and the drought could have contributed to the civil war in Syria.

About the tool: 

Tool NameDrought, Water, War, and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations 
Topic(s) in DisciplineInternational Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, War, Civil War, Security, Human Migration
Climate Topic Disasters and Hazards; Climate and Society; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance; Climate Change and Food Security 
Type of tool Video/ Microlecture (5 min 45 secs)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byYale Climate Connections
Hosted atYouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Erosion of State Sovereignty

A reading titled ‘Climate Change, the Erosion of State Sovereignty, and World Order’ by Francesco Femia and Caitlin E. Werell that discusses how climate change can potentially stress natural resources and its effect on state stability and sovereignty. The reading discusses different threats to state sovereignty and potential causes of political instability, conflict and state collapse with respect to climate change induced natural resource stress. 

Students will learn about how climate change causes stress on a state’s natural resources and how it impacts its functioning and development. They will also learn about different types of state structures and their vulnerability to climate change induced human migration, political instability and conflict. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect the internal security of a country?
  2. Discuss the six types of erosion of sovereignty from the reading.

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate Change, the Erosion of State Sovereignty, and World Order
DisciplineSocial Sciences, International Relations
Topic(s) in DisciplineInternational Studies, Geopolitics, Peace and Conflict Studies, Security, State Sovereignty, Human Migration, War
Climate Topic Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance; Climate and Society
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byFrancesco Femia and Caitlin E. Werrell in Epicenters of Climate and Security: The New Geostrategic Landscape of the Anthropocene eds Caitlin E. Werrell and Francesco Femia
Hosted atThe Center for Climate and Security
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Climate Change and the Syrian Civil War

A reading titled ‘Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought’ by Kelley et al (2015), in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that discusses how climate change could have caused the 2007-2010 drought that may have led to the civil war in Syria. This article from 2015 first drew linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria. In this article, the authors separate the natural variability of Syrian climate from anthropogenically induced climate change and conclude that the warming and drying weather trend was caused due to human influence.

Students will understand how climate change can alter the weather of a region and can cause droughts. Using the example of the 2007-10 drought in Syria, students will learn how global warming can affect food security and even lead to mass human migration. Students will further learn how poor governance, state fragility, unsustainable environmental policies coupled with global warming impacts can lead to the collapse of the state, poverty, and war.  

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss how climate change could have led to the 2007-2010 drought in Syria 
  2. Discuss the linkages between climate change, the drought, mass migration, political instability, and civil war in Syria.

About the tool: 

Tool NameClimate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought
DisciplineSocial Sciences, Environmental Sciences 
Topic(s) in DisciplineDrought, Peace and Conflict Studies, Security, Human Migration, War, Civil War, Syria
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance, Disasters and Hazards
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate 
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byColin P. Kelly Shahrzad Mohtadi, Mark A. Cane, Richard Seager, Yochanan Kushnir
Hosted atProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Video Micro-lecture: Climate Change and Human Evolution

A video lecture by Raghu Murtugudde​, University of Maryland, on the impacts of climate change on human evolution and early civilizations. This video lecture is part 1 of a 3-part lecture series titled ‘Climate Change on Historic Timescales’ of a MOOC. This  MOOC is titled ‘Climate Change’ and has been developed by the National Resource Centre on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India.

Students will learn how climate change possibly impacted speciation, bipedalism, evolution of brain size, cultural evolution and the appearance and disappearance of certain ancient civilizations. They will also learn about the impact of various glacial and interglacial periods, East-African aridification, and changes in sea surface temperature and rainfall on human evolution and history during the Pleistocene. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How has climate change potentially impacted our evolution from apes to Homo sapiens?
  2. Explain the relationship between plate tectonics, El Nino patterns and human evolution.
  3. Discuss examples of species extinction by early human in Africa and Australia. 

About the Tool

Tool NameW04 C03 P05 L01 Climate Change on Historical Timescales Lecture 01
DisciplineBiological Sciences, Earth Sciences, Environmental Studies, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineHuman Evolution, Anthropology, Human History, Early Civilizations, Bipedalism,  East-African Aridification
Climate TopicClimate and the Anthroposphere, Climate and Biosphere, Climate Variability Record
Type of toolVideo (42 mins)
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNational Resource Centre (NRC) on Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, India
Hosted atIISER Pune Channel on YouTube
LinkLink
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Audio: The Art of Storytelling

An audio conversation between storyteller and performing artist, Jo Blake and storyteller and art therapist, Sarah Deco on the relationship between mythologies and climate change narratives. This podcast focuses on how climate narratives can affect individual action and behaviour.

Students will be introduced to how ancient myths psychologically affect us as individuals and connect us to others through nature and culture. They will also learn how to use the nature of myth and storytelling to emotionally impact people to be hopeful and action-driven with reference to the current climate crisis. Additionally, they will also learn how to overcome trauma and grief caused by climate change through the use of myths, storytelling and collective experiences. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the art of storytelling and how is it used to narrate myths?
  2. Give an example of how a myth can be used as a symbolism to overcome climate change related grief and trauma?

About the Tool

Tool NameCan ancient myths help transform the narratives that led to the climate change crisis?
DisciplineHumanities, Social Science, Psychology
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnglish, Storytelling, Climate Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Myths and Mythology
Climate TopicClimate and Society; Climate Literacy
Type of toolAudio (28 mins)
Grade LevelHigh School, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byClimate Psychology Alliance
Hosted atClimate Psychology Alliance
LinkAudio Link
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Water, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes the gendered roles of water provision and management. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses the access, consumption and use of water resources by women. It also focuses on  challenges that women face due to climate change induced water scarcity.

Students will learn about gender inequalities with regards to water accessibility, consumption and utilization. They will also learn how climate change may increase the burden and responsibilities on women due to water scarcity and other impacts.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of water management and climate change. 
  2. What challenges do women face due to climate change induced water scarcity?
  3. How does women’s knowledge of household water issues contribute to effective water management and planning?

About the tool 

Tool NameWater, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Water, Water Management, Water Scarcity
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/water.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Waste, Gender and Climate Change

A short introductory reading from the GenderCC Women for Climate Justice website that summarizes waste management, gender and climate change. This reading is part of a larger study on the gender dimensions of climate change in several sectors such as agriculture, biodiversity, consumption, disaster, energy, forests, health, migration, population, tourism, transport, waste and water. The reading specifically discusses gender inequalities, labour, and consumption in the formal and informal waste management sectors of high-income, middle-income and low-income countries. 

Students will learn about waste management and climate change and gender inequalities in the sector. They will also learn about marginalization of women in the formal and informal waste industry.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. Discuss the gender dimensions of the waste management sector and climate change.
  2. Why is it necessary to consider women’s needs in effective waste management systems?

About the tool 

Tool NameWaste, Gender and Climate Change
DisciplineSocial Sciences
Topic(s) in DisciplineGender, Gender Studies, Waste Management
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byGenderCC Women for Climate Justice
Hosted atGenderCC Women for Climate Justice website
Linkhttps://www.gendercc.net/gender-climate/waste.html
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic