Classroom/ Laboratory Activity: Carbon Pricing Dashboard of the World Bank

An interactive visualization tool with map, data and downloadable graphs to understand the carbon pricing initiatives of various nations over a thirty-year period from 1991 to 2021. The tool ‘Carbon Pricing Dashboard- Map & Data’ of the World Bank includes greenhouse gas emissions, carbon prices implemented across different countries and the value of the carbon pricing initiatives  (ETS or Carbon Tax).

Students will be able to  explore data from different regions or countries, download the data/graphs on their carbon pricing data and draw comparisons to improve understanding of the real-world scenario of carbon pricing across various geographies. They will also be able to determine which carbon pricing initiative is most suitable for that region. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Discuss the share of the global greenhouse gas emissions by regions from 1991 to 2021 
  2. Carbon pricing is used as an instrument for making climate change policies. Discuss. 

About the tool

Tool NameCarbon Pricing Dashboard 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Emissions Trading Systems (ETS) Cost-Benefit Analysis, Greenhouse Gas Emissions 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change 
Type of tool Classroom/ Laboratory Activity  
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe World Bank
Hosted atThe World Bank
Linkhttps://carbonpricingdashboard.worldbank.org/map_data
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The Social Cost of Carbon

A reading titled ‘The Social Cost of Carbon and the Shadow Price of Carbon’ by Richard Price, Simeon Thornton and Stephen Nelson  Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), London, that discusses the topics of social cost of carbon (SCC) and shadow pricing of carbon (SPC) when formulating appraisals and climate change policies. This resource uses the United Kingdom (UK) as the area of study but can also be used for other regions. The reading introduces the concepts of shadow prices and market prices and explains the link between them. It includes discussions  on the benefits of calculating both the SCC and the SPC to reflect the overall cost of greenhouse gas emissions to determine a well-informed stabilisation goal. It further includes discussions to understand the importance of climate informed policies in the economic assessment of a country.

Students will learn about the social cost of carbon and the shadow price of carbon. They will learn how to  compare the marginal abatement costs and social costs of carbon for different stabilization goals as determined by the Stern Review. Students will further learn the application of the SCC and the SPC when determining cost-effectiveness of resources, the concepts of discounting and discount rates for calculating carbon prices

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Carbon pricing is used as an instrument for making climate policies. Explain.
  2. What is the difference between market prices and shadow prices?
  3. What is the importance of shadow pricing in evaluating the costs of greenhouse gases?

About the tool

Tool NameThe Social Cost of Carbon and the Shadow Price of Carbon: what they are, and how to use them in economic appraisal in the UK 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Social Cost of Carbon, Shadow Price of Carbon, Carbon Pricing, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Market Price, Stabilization Goals, Marginal Abatement Cost, Emissions 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationUnited Kingdom 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byRichard Price, Simeon Thornton and Stephen Nelson
Hosted atMunich Personal RePEc Archive (MPRA)
Linkhttps://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/74976/1/MPRA_paper_74976.pdf
AccessOnline/Offline 
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: Introduction to Carbon Pricing

A reading by the World Bank Group that introduces what is carbon pricing and discusses the link between carbon pricing and climate change policies. The reading  includes sections on 

  1. Main types of carbon pricing
  2. International carbon pricing
  3. Regional, national and subnational carbon pricing
  4. Internal carbon pricing
  5. How to do carbon pricing right

Students will learn about carbon pricing and economic policy, decarbonisation, clean technology and market innovation. They will also learn about how carbon pricing can influence economic development and growth and inform climate change policies. Students will further learn about the types of carbon pricing that governments and businesses refer to in order to make well informed economic decisions. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is carbon pricing?
  2. How is carbon pricing used as an instrument for climate change policies?

About the tool

Tool NameWhat is Carbon Pricing?
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEnvironmental Economics, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Economic Growth, Climate Change Policies, Decarbonisation 
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance 
Type of tool Reading 
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe World Bank  
Hosted atThe World Bank
Linkhttps://carbonpricingdashboard.worldbank.org/what-carbon-pricing
AccessOnline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 3

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains discussions on the need to stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and the subsequents cost of doing the same. The reading is subdivided into seven chapters, as follows:

  1. Projecting the growth of greenhouse gas emissions: This chapter discusses the past drivers of global emissions growth and a future prediction with ‘business-as-usual’ scenario in case of climate policy inaction.  [pp 169 – 192 (as per table of contents) or pp 214- 237 (as per scrolling)]
  2. The challenge of stabilisation: This chapter details steps that can be taken to stabilise GHG emissions and the cost of delay. [pp 193 – 210 (as per table of contents) or pp 238 – 255 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Identifying the costs of mitigation: This chapter looks at how mitigation costs are identified for various methods to reduce GHG emissions, who will pay for them, and what will be the long-term impacts of GHG cost-cutting. [pp 211 – 238 (as per table of contents) or pp 256 – 283(as per scrolling)]
  4. Macroeconomic models of costs: This chapter goes into the modelling approaches to calculate costs, the factors that may impact these costs, and how GHG emission cost-cutting might affect GDP. [pp 239 – 252 (as per table of contents) or pp 284 – 297 (as per scrolling)]
  5. Structural change and competitiveness: This chapter looks at the impacts of climate-change policies about market structure, trade, location and industrial emissions on market competitiveness.  [pp 253 – 268 (as per table of contents) or pp 298 – 313(as per scrolling)]
  6. Opportunities and wider benefits from climate policies: This chapter looks at the benefits and opportunities of climate change action for various industries and services and how it will impact the overall financial market.  [pp 269 -283 (as per table of contents) or pp 314 – 328 (as per scrolling)]
  7. Towards a goal for climate change policy: This chapter looks at cost-benefit analysis and climate change policy in the long run with a focus on fast changes to avoid adverse risks.  [pp 284 – 307 (as per table of contents) or pp 329 – 352(as per scrolling)]

Students will learn the cause of the rise in greenhouse gas emissions and how, due to advancement in energy technology, income growth is no longer solely dependent on emission growth. They will also learn that the benefits of climate change policies for markets and industries outweigh its costs in the long-run. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What will happen if we continue with the ‘business-as-usual’ scenario of greenhouse gas emissions?
  2. State cost-effective methods and techniques to reduce greenhouse gas emission.
  3. How does The Review calculate marginal costs and marginal benefits of climate change policy?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart III: The economics of stabilisation from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, International Economics, Integrated Assessment Model, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Economic Policy, Competitive Market Policies
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of toolReading (pp 168 to 307) –  as per table of content; (pp 213 – 352) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelUndergraduate, Graduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Classroom/ Laboratory activity: Climate Mitigation and Willingness to Pay

A classroom/laboratory activity based on data on citizens’ willingness to pay to reduce carbon emissions as a method of mitigating climate change. This data is collected through an online survey by the German government and is available for download in Excel, R, and Google Sheet formats.

Students will be able to analyse the data to construct indices for measuring attitudes or opinions. They will also learn to use Cronbach’s alpha and Likert scale. Additionally, they will use mean, standard deviation, correlation/correlation coefficient, and confidence interval to analyze the results. Through this activity, they will be able to compare the measures of willingness to pay with climate policymaking. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is ‘willingness to pay’?
  2. How to measure willingness to pay for non-market goods like abatement to pollution?
  3. What is Cronbach’s alpha? How is it used to assess indices for internal consistency?

About the tool

Tool NameMeasuring Willingness to Pay for Climate Change Mitigation
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Likert Scale, Cronbach’s Alpha, Value of Abatement, Contingent Valuation
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Classroom/ Laboratory Activity  
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, Germany
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCORE Project
Hosted atCORE Project Website
Linkhttps://www.core-econ.org/doing-economics/book/text/11-01.html
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsIntermediate

Reading: Willingness to Cooperate and Climate Policy

A reading titled ‘Cooperation in the Climate Commons’ by the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. This working paper describes the willingness to cooperate as a climate solution and how it is impacted by different mitigation efforts.

Students will learn how mitigation efforts depend either on an individual’s willingness to voluntarily adapt ‘green’ consumer behaviour or through enforcement of costly public policy or a combination of the two. They will further study how various factors, such as peer pressure, social interventions, individual beliefs, trust in economic development, and local punishment policies, impact mitigation efforts. They will also learn how international and domestic climate policy affects individuals’ willingness to cooperate. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are ‘climate commons’?
  2. How does willingness to cooperate through voluntary adaptation of green consumer behaviour differ from forceful implementation of costly public policy?
  3. What is the ‘zero-contribution’ proposition and why did the study reject it?

About the tool

Tool NameCooperation in the Climate Commons
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Theory, Willingness to Cooperate, Public Policy, Climate Commons, Global Commons, Tragedy of the Commons, Mitigation
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal, 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byThe Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP), University of Leeds and The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Policy. Authored by Stefano Carattini, Simon Levin and Alessandro Tavoni
Hosted atCentre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, UK
Linkhttps://www.cccep.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/working-paper-259-Carattini-et-al.pdf?from_serp=1
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Willingness to Pay for Climate Stability

A review article by Evan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, on willingness to pay (WTP) for climate policy. This working paper is divided into five sections as follows:

  1. Section 1 describes the characteristics of WTP as an empirical tool for climate stability.
  2. Section 2 discusses literature review on WTP for climate policy, through to social and behavioural aspects.
  3. Section 3 explains calculations used and the results of comparison of various studies.
  4. Section 4 discusses a new research agenda to improve factors for identifying WTP.
  5. Section 5 concludes the study.

Students will learn about WTP in context to climate stability and the need to study it. They will also learn about which factors are commonly used to identify WTP and how they are calculated through empirical assessment. Additionally they will also learn about the challenges of using the current factors in determining the WTP and what can be done to improve its measurement.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What is willingness to pay (WTP)?
  2. How is WTP calculated with regards to climate policy?
  3. What factors are commonly used to define willingness to change and how can they be improved?

About the tool

Tool NameWillingness to Pay for Climate Policy: A Review of Estimates
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineWillingness to Pay (WTP), Economic Theory, Public Policy, Integrated Assessment Model, Consumer Psychology
Climate Topic Climate Mitigation and Adaptation; Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of tool Reading (pp 1 – 32)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byEvan Johnson and Gregory Nemet, Robert M. La Follete School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hosted atSocial Science Research Network Website
Linkhttps://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1626931
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Pollution Permits and Opportunity Costs

A reading by Holt et al. in the International Review of Economics Education, provided by The Economics Network, UK, that can be used for a classroom/laboratory activity to teach your students to identify and account for opportunity costs in production decisions.

Students will learn about opportunity costs and tradable emission permits as a part of the cap and trade scheme. They will also learn of challenges in decision-making through a role-playing activity in which the students get to set production quantities within the limits of their emissions permits. 

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. Define the following:
    1. Opportunity Cost
    2. Production Cost
    3. Cap and Trade
    4. Pollution/Emissions Permit
  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of using tradable emissions permits in the context of climate change?

About the tool

Tool NameTeaching Opportunity Cost in an Emissions Permit Experiment
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineOpportunity Costs, Consumer Choices, Fixed Market price, Tradable Pollution/ Emission Permits, Emission Permit Allocation, Cap and Trade Schemes
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading (pp 34 – 42)
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byCharles Holt, Erica Myers, Markus Wråke, Svante Mandell and Dallas Burtraw
Hosted atInternational Review of Economics Education, provided by The Economics Network, UK
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Economic Externalities

A reading titled ‘Global Warming and Economic Externalities’ by Armon Rezai, Duncan K. Foley and Lance Taylor, that discusses greenhouse gases (GHG) as a negative externality in global markets. The reading discusses the effect of mitigation investments on the economic well being of current and future generations. It also demonstrates how equilibrium theory can correct negative externalities through the use of  the Keynes-Ramsey growth model.

Students will learn about global warming, equity, and externalities. They will understand concepts such as ‘business-as-usual’ that influence market optimisation and impact climate change. Students will further learn about  the market failure of climate change and the required mitigation investment to correct it.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are negative externalities in economics?
  2. What are the negative externalities associated with climate change?
  3. How can mitigation investments correct negative externalities? 

About the tool

Tool NameGlobal Warming and Economic Externalities
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomic Externalities, Negative Externalities, Market Failure, Keynes-Ramsey Growth Model
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of tool Reading
Grade LevelUndergraduate
LocationGlobal 
LanguageEnglish 
Translation
Developed byArmon Rezai, Duncan K. Foley and Lance Taylor
Hosted atResearch Gate
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic 

Reading: The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change Part 1

A reading from the ‘Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change’ by economist Nicholas Stern for the Government of the United Kingdom which contains a compilation of the scientific evidence of human caused climate change, its analysis through economic theory, and discussion on possible alternatives for development. The reading is subdivided into three chapters, as follows:

  1. The Science of Climate Change: This chapter provides scientific evidence to link the increase in greenhouse gases to climate change along with its impact at the regional and global level. [pp 1 – 22 (as per table of contents) or pp 46 – 67 (as per scrolling)]
  2. Economics, Ethics and Climate Change: This chapter discusses the externalities and the cost-benefit analysis of climate change. It focuses on the risks and uncertainty it may pose to free markets, economic policies, welfare, equity, justice, freedoms and rights. [pp 23 – 40 (as per table of contents) or pp 68 – 85 (as per scrolling)]
  3. Ethical Frameworks and Intertemporal Equity:​​ This chapter looks at the relevance of some technical frameworks such as – intertemporal appraisal, cost-benefit analysis, and discounting, in tackling various challenges posed by climate change. [pp 41 – 54 (as per table of contents) or pp 86 – 99 (as per scrolling)]

Students will learn how to analyse climate change through the lens of economics. They will also learn about the economic activities that have contributed most to greenhouse gas emissions and the possible policy challenges that may arise from it.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How does an increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases cause global warming?
  2. State some of the economic risks and uncertainties caused due to a rise in greenhouse gas emissions?
  3. What is discounting? How is this method used to calculate the economic risks in the Stern Review?

About the Tool

Tool NamePart I: Climate Change: Our Approach from Stern Review: The Economics of Climate Change 
DisciplineEconomics
Topic(s) in DisciplineEconomics of Climate Change, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Economic Risk, Economic Policy, Cost-Benefit analysis, Discounting, Uncertainty
Climate TopicEnergy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of toolReading (pp 1 to 54 ) –  as per table of contents; (pp 46 – 99) – as per scrolling
Grade LevelHighschool, Undergraduate
LocationGlobal
LanguageEnglish
Translation
Developed byNicholas Stern
Hosted atGrupo de Pesquisa em Mudancas Climaticas (GPMC), Brazil
LinkLink
AccessOnline/Offline
Computer SkillsBasic

Reading: Social Cost of Carbon 

A journal article by William Nordhaus on the critical role of the social cost of carbon (SCC) in determining climate change economics and policies. This paper estimates the SCC using the Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy (DICE model). 

Students will understand the application of the DICE model to calculate the SCC in the development of climate change policies. They will also learn how the SCC is central in climate change regulatory policies.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. “The most important single economic concept in the economics of climate change is the social cost of carbon (SCC).” Discuss.  
  2. Describe the DICE model and its application in determining the SCC.
  3. How does the SCC affect the economic growth of a country? Explain through examples

About the Tool 

Tool Name Revisiting the social cost of carbon
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Social Cost of Carbon, DICE model, Climate Change Policy, Climate Economics, Economic Policy, Econometrics
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by William D. Nordhaus (Yale University)
Hosted at Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Economic Inequality and Global Warming

A guidebook of gender-sensitive approaches to climate change policy for city planning. It discusses the different ways in which women and men are affected by climate change. This guidebook includes discussions on gender inequalities such as gender division of labour, gender differentials in income, gender biases in decision making, and other factors contributing to climate vulnerability.

Students will understand how climate change impacts genders differently. They will also learn the importance of gender sensitivity in formulating climate change policies. Students will be introduced to gender sensitive climate adaptation, mitigation and resilience in cities.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. How does climate change affect genders differently?
  2. Give a few reasons why climate change policies should use a gender-sensitive approach
  3. What are the priorities for gender-sensitive climate policies at urban levels?

About the Tool 

Tool Name Gender and Urban Climate Policy: Gender-Sensitive Policies Make a Difference
Discipline Humanities, Social Sciences
Topic(s) in Discipline Gender, Gender and Climate Change, Gender Inequality, Urban Planning, Public Policy, Climate Change Policy, Climate Vulnerability
Climate Topic Climate and Society, Policies, Politics, and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development 
Hosted at Giz, UN Habitat, Gender CC 
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

 

Reading: Capitalism and Global Warming

A reading by Jonathan T. Park, University of Utah, that discusses the link between climate change and capitalism. This reading discusses how consumer ideology in a capitalist society results in the overproduction and overconsumption of goods. It includes discussions on exploitation of natural resources, high energy expenditure, excess waste production and extensive environmental degradation due to pollution.

Students will learn how capitalist modes of production require large scale burning of fossil fuels to meet energy requirements that contribute towards global warming. They will also learn how the capitalist model can be modified for a sustainable future.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to: 

  1. What are capitalist modes of production?
  2. Discuss the relationship between capitalist modes of production, fossil fuel burning and global warming.

About the Tool 

Tool Name Climate Change and Capitalism
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Capitalist Modes of Production, Rise of Capitalism, Consumerism, Materials Economy, Commodification, Fossil Fuels, Natural Resources
Climate Topic Climate and the Anthroposphere
Type of Tool Reading
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Jonathan T. Park
Hosted at University of Utah
Link Reading Link
Access Online, Offline
Computer Skills Basic

Economics of Climate Change with William Nordhaus, Nobel Laureate (2018)

This video lecture by William Nordhaus on the economics of climate change. This is a comprehensive video on the impacts of climate change and its effect on the economy, along with a focus on economic policy for climate mitigation and adaptation.

Students will be introduced to the economics of climate change. They will learn about carbon pricing and its alternatives, use of subsidies, cap & trade, and taxation as potential climate solutions. Students will also be able to establish a link between economics and public policies and learn to integrate human economy and climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is the economics of climate change?
  2. What is carbon pricing?
  3. How can economic policies help mitigate climate change?
  4. What is the cost of policy uncertainty on climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name William Nordhaus: The Economics of Climate Change
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Economics of Climate Change, Climate Economics, Demand and Supply, Carbon Pricing, Carbon Tax, Cap and Trade, Cost Benefit Analysis
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change; Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Video (64 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Becker Friedman Institute, University of Chicago
Hosted at YouTube
Link Video
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Reading: Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

This reading is a comprehensive overview of how capitalism has shaped our response and reaction to climate change. This book is divided into three parts – Bad Timing, Magical thinking and Starting Anyway. Bad timing deals with how Free Market Fundamentalism, Invisible Hand and similar economic ideologies are used to fuel and promote climate denial culture and ecological amnesia. Magical Thinking tackles the issues of the ‘carbon credit’ scam led by a merger between Big Business and Big Green and how it allows consumers to buy into the philosophy of pollution being the solution to pollution. Starting Anyway points to the achievements by climate warriors, incidents where democracy has won, and the power of Indigenous Rights movements. This book also includes how economies and policies can move away from ‘extractivism’ and towards renewals.

Each of these sections will introduce students to a school of thought within capitalism and how that is being used to manipulate the consumer perspective towards Climate Change. It will help them understand the psychological implications of Free Market, Invisible Hands, Green Billionaire, and Extractivist Policies. Students will also be introduced to Atmospheric Commons, Ecological Amnesia, and Climate Denial Science. It will provide them with a good balance of which economics practices have worked and which haven’t to help get a full picture of how capitalism affects climate change.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. What is Capitalism? Name some Capitalist ideologies and Theories.
  2. How has capitalism shaped our perception of and response to climate change?
  3. What can we learn from success stories to help make economic practices and policies sustainable?

About the Tool

Tool Name Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything – Capitalism vs. The Climate
Discipline Economics, Social Sciences, Humanities
Topic(s) in Discipline Capitalism, Free Market Economy, Invisible Hand, Green Economy, Atmospheric Commons, Social Theory, Culture and Cultural Studies
Climate Topic Energy, Economics and Climate Change, Climate and Society, Climate and Food Security, Policies, Politics and Environmental Governance
Type of Tool Reading (505 pages)
Grade Level Undergraduate, Graduate
Location Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by Naomi Klein (author)
Hosted at Internet Archive Python library 0.6.3
Link Link
Access Online and Offline (downloadable)
Computer Skills Basic

Audio: Economic solutions for Climate Change

As a teacher of Economics, this podcast can teach your students about Environmental Resources and Energy Economics, and use of carbon tax policy as a possible economic solution to climate change.

This audio will help students understand the relationship between economics and climate change. Additionally they will learn about carbon pricing theory and its effectiveness. They will be exposed to initiatives such as the Portfolio Decarbonization Coalition and will learn about the dynamics between technology, economics and politics.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

What is Environmental Economics?

  1. How has economics played a role in creating the current climate change crisis?
  2. What is carbon pricing and how does it work?
  3. What is ‘dirty’ infrastructure and how does it impact climate change?
Tool Name Can Economics save Climate Change?
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Economics, Economics of Climate Change, Carbon Pricing, Economics of Fossil Fuels
Climate Topic Energy, Economics, and Climate Change; Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
Type of Tool Audio (51 mins)
Grade Level Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by The Elephant (Cameron Hepburn, Oxford University)
Hosted at Player FM
Link Audio Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Climate Change and Real Estate Pricing.

An audio interview that introduces the effects of climate change on real estate pricing. This interview is by Climate Cast, MPR News, with Ed Walter, Urban Land Institute Global CEO.

Students will learn how real estate firms view climate change and how rising sea levels, storm surges, and unprecedented flooding affects land prices. Through a case study, students will understand how climate change affects individual house locations and real estate pricing.

Use this tool to help your students find answers to:

  1. How are climate change and real estate related?
  2. What is the impact of climate change on land prices?
  3. How are large real estate firms addressing climate change?

About the Tool

Tool Name Climate change risk showing up in real estate
Discipline Economics
Topic(s) in Discipline Environmental Economics, Economics of Climate Change, Carbon Pricing, Economics of Fossil Fuels
Climate Topic Land Pricing, Real Estate Pricing, Disaster Management
Type of Tool Audio (5 mins)
Grade Level High-school, Undergraduate
Location  Global
Language English
Translation
Developed by BBC World Service (Paul Huttner)
Hosted at MPRNews
Link Audio Link
Access Online
Computer Skills Basic

Video: Who Is Responsible For Climate Change? Who Needs To Fix It?

This video gives an overview of global climate change, historical and annual carbon emissions, and biggest and smallest contributors to the emissions. This video is part of a series about climate change supported by Breakthrough Energy

Classroom/Laboratory Activity, Teaching Module: Cost-Benefit Analysis for Carbon Emissions Abatement

A classroom/laboratory activity or teaching module to perform cost-benefit analysis for carbon emissions abatement, considered to be an action that will mitigate climate change.